The “Double Irish” is a creative accounting technique that legally allows companies to significantly reduce their overseas tax burden. David Dennis Google is moving even more money through a shell corporation in Bermuda—reaching a total of €8.8 billion ($11.91 billion) in 2012, 25 percent more than it did in 2011. By employing a legal yet ethically questionable practice, Google is saving itself billions in taxes worldwide.

The new figures were first reported by the Financial Times on Friday, citing “[recent] filings by one of Google’s Dutch subsidiaries.” This widespread strategy of moving money around involves two specific tactics known as the “Dutch Sandwich” and the “Double Irish.” (Ars obtained a copy of this filing, dated September 27, 2013, from an anonymous source.) As the Times concluded, these disclosures mean “that royalty payments made to Bermuda—where the company holds its non-US intellectual property—have doubled over the past three years.

This increase reflects the rapid growth of Google’s global business.”     

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