Chris Woods Twenty-five years after the Web’s inception, its creator has urged the public to reengage with its original design: a decentralized Internet that remains open to all. Speaking with Wired editor David Rowan at an event launching the magazine’s March issue, Tim Berners-Lee said that although part of this is about keeping an eye on for-profit Internet monopolies such as search engines and social networks, the greatest danger is the emergence of a balkanized Web. “I want a Web that’s open, works internationally, works as well as possible, and is not nation-based,” Berners-Lee told the audience, which included Martha Lane Fox, Jake Davis (aka Topiary) and Lily Cole.

He suggested one example to the contrary: “What I don’t want is a Web where the Brazilian government has every social network’s data stored on servers on Brazilian soil. That would make it so difficult to set one up.”     

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