A class of coding vulnerabilities could allow attackers to fool Windows system administrators into running malicious code because of a simple omission: quotation marks.
The attack relies on scripts or batch files that use the command-line interface, or “shell,” on a Windows system but contain a simple coding error—allowing untrusted input to be run as a command. In the current incarnation of the exploit, an attacker appends a valid command onto the end of the name of a directory using the ampersand character. A script with the coding error then reads the input and executes the command with administrator rights.
“The scenario… requires a ‘standard’ user with access rights to create a directory to a fileserver and an administrator executing a vulnerable script,” Frank Lycops and Raf Cox, security researchers with The Security Factory, said in an e-mail interview. “This allows the attacker to gain the privileges of the user running the script, thus becoming an administrator.”
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