Elvert Barnes

In a rare decision, the Florida Supreme Court ruled last Friday that law enforcement must get a warrant in order to track a suspect’s location via his or her mobile phone.
Many legal experts applauded the decision as a step in the right direction for privacy.
“[The] opinion is a resounding defense of our right to privacy in the digital age,” Nate Freed Wessler, staff attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, said in a statement. “Following people’s movements by secretly turning their cell phones into tracking devices can reveal extremely sensitive details of our lives, like where we go to the doctor or psychiatrist, where we spend the night, and who our friends are. Police are now on notice that they need to get a warrant from a judge before tracking cell phones, whether using information from the service provider or their own ‘stingray’ cell phone tracking equipment.”
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