Trying to control customer opinions online is nearly always a losing game for a business, and there’s now a long line of cases where it has backfired on the business. We uncovered a new example this month, when a reader contacted Ars Technica to show us the “Social Media Addendum” that his Florida apartment complex, called Windermere Cay, included in his lease.
The Social Media Addendum, published here, is a triple-whammy. First, it explicitly bans all “negative commentary and reviews on Yelp! [sic], Apartment Ratings, Facebook, or any other website or Internet-based publication or blog.” It also says any “breach” of the Social Media Addendum will result in a $10,000 fine, to be paid within ten business days. Finally, it goes ahead and assigns the renters’ copyrights to the owner—not just the copyright on the negative review, but “any and all written or photographic works regarding the Owner, the Unit, the property, or the apartments.” Snap a few shots of friends who come over for a dinner party? They’re owned by your landlord.
Contacted by Ars, a manager disclaimed the contract—even though it had been given to a tenant to sign just a few days before.
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