The first major judicial ruling slamming the NSA’s bulk collection of phone records has been overturned. In 2013, US District Judge Richard Leon ruled the program was likely unconstitutional, but held off on shutting it down until an appeals court could weigh in.
That’s finally happened, and the appeals ruling (PDF) shows the three-judge panel didn’t see things the same way as Leon.
The case is still relevant despite the fact that the new USA Freedom Act passed in June. The law prevents the NSA from running its own database, instead forcing the agency to get phone records from the telcos. But because the government’s database was allowed a 180 day period for an “orderly transition,” telephone records are still being collected, for now.
Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Leave a Reply