The National Crime Agency (NCA) wants more organisations to join the government’s cyber security threat-sharing scheme, as data reveals suggests it could have thwarted 30,000 cyber attacks.
The Cyber-Security Information Sharing Partnership (CISP), which is co-run by the NCA and the UK Computer Emergency Response Team (Cert-UK), encourages participants to flag and share details of the cyber crime threats they encounter.

It is hoped sharing this type of data will allow members to shore up their own cyber defences and evade attacks. To assist with this, they also have the option to call on cyber protection experts working in the Regional Organised Crime Units dotted about the UK.
Chris Gibson, director of Cert-UK, explained: “The alerts are available to companies who are part of the Cyber-Security Information Sharing Partnership, which is a free to joint industry/government initiative to share cyber threat and vulnerability information in order to increase overall situational awareness of the cyber threat and, therefore, reduce the impact on UK business.”
According to statistics released today, the initiative paved the way for internet hosting firms to share the details of more than 30,000 cyber crime threats, while customised alerts have also been passed to 50 organisations over the past three months.
This, it is claimed, has resulted in a 12% reduction in the number of threats detected on these hosting firm’s servers.
In light of its success to date, the NCA has now sought to remind other hosting companies about what they stand to gain by joining the CISP, as it works towards ensuring UK PLC is adequately prepared to facedown the threat of cyber attacks.
Paul Hoare, industry partnerships senior manager at the NCA’s National Cyber Crime Unit, said joining the scheme allowed many of the participants to protect themselves from large data and financial losses.  
“Working with industry to jointly combat cyber crime is a priority for the NCA, and sharing timely customised intelligence with hosting companies can contribute to the protection of the UK internet infrastructure,” said Hoare.
“We continue to use all the means at our disposal to make the UK’s people and businesses the most difficult possible targets for cyber criminals.”

Leave a Reply