Brazil nuts scattered at the base of trees in the Amazon.

These trees are so common in the Amazon today as a result of human cultivation that began over 8,000 years ago. (credit: Lior Golgner)
Though the Amazon forest may appear wild and uncharted, a new comprehensive study has revealed that it’s actually the result of some of humanity’s earliest experiments with farming. People have been living in the Amazon for more than 10,000 years, building some of the greatest civilizations of the ancient world.

They also dramatically changed the Amazon forest in ways that are still obvious today.
Wageningen University environmental science researcher Carolina Levis and a large international team of ecologists and archaeologists contributed to a study for Science that is bound to transform our view of the Amazon. “People arrived in the Amazon at least 10,000 years ago, and they started to use the species that were there.

And more than 8,000 years ago, they selected some individuals with specific phenotypes that are useful for humans,” Levis told the Atlantic‘s Robinson Meyer. “They really cultivated and planted these species in their home gardens, in the forests they were managing.” These early cultivators were domesticating trees at roughly the same time that Neolithic peoples in the Levant were first domesticating wheat and barley.
Working with data from the Amazon Tree Diversity Network, Levis and her colleagues identified 85 domesticated tree species out of 4,962 species in the Amazon.

But these 85 species had an outsized influence on the composition of the forest itself. “We found that 20 of these 85 domesticated species are hyperdominants: five times higher than the number of hyperdominant species expected by chance,” they write in Science. Overall, about 20 percent of all species in the Amazon forest today are the result of ancient domestication.
In areas where large ancient civilizations existed, the numbers of domestics are closer to 30 percent.
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