Enlarge / Intellectual Ventures CEO Nathan Myhrvold at The New York Times‘ “Food For Tomorrow” conference in 2015. (credit: Neilson Barnard / Getty Images)
Intellectual Ventures boasts of having more than 30,000 patents—but you’d have to look for a long time to find one that can hold up under real scrutiny.
After staying quiescent for years, IV opened up a barrage of lawsuits to enforce its patents in 2010.

But the companies that decided to stand up to IV rather than buckle under have been faring well, as judges have found the patents that IV has chosen to enforce in court less than impressive.
It’s a telling sign about the giant patent-holder’s collection.

Given the opportunity to pull just about any patent out of its huge collection, one would assume the company would choose the best of the lot.

But much of it appears to be exactly the kind of easy handouts from the dot-com boom era that have been called out by critics of “patent trolls.”
Earlier this week, Intellectual Ventures lost two more major patent cases at the nation’s top patent court.
It lost a case against Erie Indemnity Company and several other insurers, which had stood accused of infringing US Patent Nos. 6,510,434, 6,519,581, and 6,546,002. The same judges also tossed patents asserted against banking company Capital One.

All were found invalid under the Supreme Court’s Alice Corp. precedent, which barred many patents that describe basic business processes and add computer jargon.
Read 10 remaining paragraphs

Leave a Reply