Windows switch to Git almost complete: 8,500 commits and 1,760 builds each dayEnlarge (credit: Git)
Back in February, Microsoft made the surprising announcement that the Windows development team was going to move to using the open source Git version control system for Windows development.

A little over three months after that first revelation, and about 90 percent of the Windows engineering team has made the switch.
The switch to Git has been driven by a couple of things.
In 2013, the company embarked on its OneCore project, unifying its different strands of Windows development and making the operating system a more cleanly modularized, layered platform.

At the time, Microsoft was using SourceDepot, a customized version of the commercial Perforce version control system, for all its major projects.
SourceDepot couldn’t handle a project the size of Windows, so rather than having the whole operating system in a single repository, the Windows code was actually divided among 65 different repositories, with a kind of virtualization layer on top to produce a unified view of all the code.
Some of these 65 repos contained nicely isolated, standalone components; others took vertical or horizontal slices through the operating system; others were just grab bags of different code.

As such, the repo structure didn’t correspond with OneCore’s module boundaries.
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