Tens of millions of Winamp users are still out there. (credit: Flickr user uzi978) As many of us are busy crafting the perfect playlist for grilling outdoors, most likely such labor is happening on a modern streaming service or within iTunes.

But during the last 15 years or so, that wasn’t always the case.

Today, we resurface our look at the greatest MP3 player that was—Winamp.

This piece originally ran on June 24, 2012 (and Winamp finally called it quits in November 2013).

MP3s are so natural to the Internet now that it’s almost hard to imagine a time before high-quality compressed music.

But there was such a time—and even after “MP3” entered the mainstream, organizing, ripping, and playing back one’s music collection remained a clunky and frustrating experience.
Enter Winamp, the skin-able, customizable MP3 player that “really whips the llama’s ass.” In the late 1990s, every music geek had a copy; llama-whipping had gone global, and the big-money acquisition offers quickly followed.

AOL famously acquired the company in June 1999 for $80-$100 million—and Winamp almost immediately lost its innovative edge.
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