A bare-metal cloud allows you to rent hardware resources from a public cloud service provider, or sometimes a managed service provider. With a bare-metal cloud, you get direct access to the hardware platform without having to go through tenant management systems.

Therefore, one of the benefits of bare-metal cloud, as it is sold to the public, is the ability to better support high-transaction workloads that do not tolerate latency. I’ve found that bare-metal is often used by tier 2 cloud providers, and managed services providers, as a selling point of their “cloud.” Indeed, enterprises that are still attempting to maintain control over their hardware and software often pick bare-metal to maintain that control, typically while not considering costs and workloads requirements. To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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