Enlarge / Ryzen die shot. (credit: AMD)
AMD has used CES to lay out its plans for 2018. Over the first half of the year, the company is going to release the final missing members of the Ryzen product line-up.
Starting in April and continuing into the second half of the year, Ryzen will start rolling out a refreshed version of its Zen core. We’ll also see a more complete GPU line-up released over the next year—but there aren’t plans to release a more mainstream Vega-based GPU range.
The first mobile-oriented Ryzen APUs (CPUs with integrated GPUs) were released last year. On January 9, the company will add Ryzen 3-branded low-end parts to the line-up, and February 12 will see the launch of desktop APUs.
In the second quarter, Ryzen Pro Mobile parts—more or less identical to the regular Ryzen Mobile parts but with the lifecycle guarantees that enterprise buyers often demand for their fleets—will be released.
Those desktop parts, in particular, fill a significant gap in the current Ryzen range.
Integrated graphics are the mainstay of both mobile and desktop computing. Without a complete range of integrated GPU parts, there are large markets where AMD can’t compete with Intel.

By the middle of the year, AMD should have an integrated GPU part to compete with almost every one of Intel’s processors, opening up the corporate and mainstream desktop market to the company, as well as laptop markets.

The only remaining gaps will be high-power mobile processors and server processors for four or more sockets.
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