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‘No decision’ on Raytheon GPS landing system aboard Brit aircraft carriers

We've already got one tried and tested system, huffs MoD The Ministry of Defence has insisted it has made “no decisionrdquo; to install the US Navyrsquo;s JPALS aircraft carrier landing system aboard HMS Prince of Wales, the second of the Royal Navyrsquo;s two new 65,000-tonne aircraft carriers.…

Console Connect announces agreement with The Bunker to provide interconnection capabilities...

Deal will develop Console Connectrsquo;s position in financial sector and improve the data sovereignty options of The Bunkerrsquo;s customersLondon, UK, 13th June, 2017 – Console Connect, a leading provider of global direct connect solutions, today announced a deal with The Bunker, the ultra-secure Managed Services Provider.

The agreement will provide a secure means of data transmission between The Bunkerrsquo;s ex-MOD facilities and private and public cloud providers, including Amazon Web Services.The agreement also represents an... Source: RealWire

Bethesda’s E3 features new Wolfenstein, Evil Within, VR Fallout and Doom

Plus a new mod clearinghouse and footage of Skyrim for Nintendo Switch.

Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds becomes Xbox One console exclusive “later this year”

Viral game-streaming sensation will get Xbox One X-specific enhancements.

Does Valve really own Dota? A jury will decide

Federal court case could hinge on 2004 forum post granting "open source" license.

Breath of the Wild hack is like Garry’s Mod for Zelda

Spawn items and enemies whenever and wherever you want with this code.

Popular mod re-adds piracy protection to cracked game

User-made graphical fix for Nier Automata comes with Steam API check

SimCentric Technologies to exhibit at ITEC at Rotterdam, Netherlands – 16th...

SimCentric Technologies will be exhibiting at ITEC in Rotterdam, 16th – 18th May 2017. With vast ongoing global investment in the VBS3 virtual platform including UK MoD (DVS), US Army (GFT) and US Marine Corps (DVTE & ISMT), SimCentric’s value adding VBS3 middleware maximizes the return on this financial and training investment for militaries worldwide.

At ITEC, SimCentric will be demonstrating their flagship VBS3 FiresFST Pro enabling full spectrum offensive fires, close air support and... Source: RealWire

Sid Meier tells Civilization’s origin story, cites children’s history books

Lack of mod support was “horribly wrong;” responds to question about remaster.

KopiLuwak: A New JavaScript Payload from Turla

A new, unique JavaScript payload is now being used by Turla in targeted attacks.

This new payload, dubbed KopiLuwak, is being delivered using embedded macros within Office documents.

UK fails to gag press over ID of ex-spy at center...

EnlargeSpencer Platt/Getty Images reader comments 48 Share this story His name is now scribbled all over the Web, and the ex-MI6 man who is alleged to have compiled a dossier containing unsubstantiated and lurid claims about US President-elect Donald Trump is reportedly in hiding. However, despite the details being readily available online, the UK's ministry of defence—following a long-standing practice—politely requested the British press to carefully consider the potential consequences of disclosing the individual's name.
In a letter to editors and publishers, retired RAF Air Vice-Marshal Andrew Vallance, who holds the post of defence and security media advisory secretariat, said on Wednesday: In view of media stories alleging that a former SIS [secret intelligence service; MI6] officer was the source of the information which allegedly compromises president-elect Donald Trump, would you and your journalists please seek my advice before making public that name. The guidance was given through fear that revealing the identity of the ex-MI6 man "could assist terrorist or other hostile organisations." Nonetheless, the BBC and other major British news organisations have disclosed details of the individual, whose name and current directorship at a London-based private security firm was initially published in the US press and heavily shared on social media. But such a decision by the BBC and others is a stark departure from the past when publications and broadcasters that received a so-called D-notice (defence notice), later replaced by a DA-notice (defence advisory notice), would often fall into line with the MoD's request in a very British spirit of collaboration. Enlarge / Google quit the D-notice committee in response to the Snowden revelations. NOVA/PBS The D-notice first came into play in 1912, two years before World War I broke out, when Whitehall mandarins decided that an organisation should be created that addressed matters of national interest. Members of the press were included on the advisory panel, and they remain so to this day. However, the makeup has changed a little: the likes of Google representatives have sat on the committee, for example, though, the US ad giant withdrew its voluntary support in light of Edward Snowden's damning disclosures about the NSA. Historically, publishers and editors have largely responded in kind to the frightfully polite requests from the MoD. Members of the committee have long argued that it doesn't amount to censorship from the British government, instead insisting that they are simply exercising restraint with stories that may, on reflection, damage national security.

But Vallance and his predecessors can only gently nudge the press to consider the sensitive material they have in their possession before publishing it. Where disputes arise between the government and publications, Vallance works independently as a go-between to "help resolve disagreement about what should be disclosed" before any legal action is taken against the press to suppress information by way of a court injunction. But today, the relevance of the D-notice—as it continually tends to be described—seems to be slowly ossifying, and we can see this from the decision by the likes of the BBC to publish the name of the ex-spy at the centre of the uncorroborated Trump dossier story, which claims that Russia has compromising information about the president-elect. In 2015, in acknowledgement that it was becoming increasingly difficult to put a lid on sensitive information being shared online, the UK government renamed the DA-notice to the Defence and Security Media Advisory (DSMA)—a system which currently costs £250,000 a year to run.

The inclusion of the word "security" is perhaps there to try to make it crystal clear to the media that supposedly risky disclosures endanger not only military and spook-types, but also British citizens. But, while it continues to try to sign up more digital and social media representatives, the DSMA committee has admitted that there is "no obvious answer" to the challenges presented by the Web.
It has previously argued that the "mainstream media" remains the superior source for news, regardless of gossipy tittle-tattle—no matter how inflammatory or lacking in reality—that is shared online.

Events in recent months, though, seem to suggest that the line is more blurred than ever before because it is far less clear who is setting the news agenda. We're in for a long four years if the answer turns out to be Trump's Twitter account. This post originated on Ars Technica UK

US Navy runs into snags with aircraft carrier’s electric plane-slingshot

EMAL system was nearly bought by the UK. Bullet dodged? Oh no The US Navy is having difficulties with its latest aircraft carrier's Electromagnetic Aircraft Launching System (EMALS) – the same system which the UK mooted fitting to its new Queen Elizabeth-class carriers. The US Department of Operational Test and Evaluation (DOTE) revealed yesterday, in its end-of-year report [PDF] for financial year 2016, that the EMALS fitted to the new nuclear-powered carrier USS Gerald R. Ford put "excessive airframe stress" on aircraft being launched. This stress "will preclude the Navy from conducting normal operations of the F/A-18A-F and EA-18G from CVN 78", according to DOTES, which said the problem had first been noticed in 2014. In addition, EMALS could not "readily" be electrically isolated for maintenance, which DOTE warned "will preclude some types of EMALS and AAG (Advanced Arresting Gear) maintenance during flight operations", decreasing their operational availability. The Gerald R. Ford is supposed to be able to launch 160 sorties in a 12-hour day – an average of one takeoff or landing every 4.5 minutes. She is supposed to be able to surge to 270 sorties in a 24-hour period. Britain considered fitting EMALS to its two new Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers right back at the design stage. Indeed, the ability to add catapults and arrester gear to the ships was specified right from the start. Lewis Page, late of this parish, summed up what happened when the government tried to exercise that option: "... it later got rescinded, on the grounds that putting catapults into the ships was not going to cost £900m – as the 2010 [Strategic Defence and Security Review] had estimated – but actually £2bn for [HMS] Prince of Wales and maybe £3bn for Queen Elizabeth. This would double the projected price of the two ships." The Aircraft Carrier Alliance – heavily dominated by BAE Systems – had not designed the new carriers to have EMALS fitted at all, taking advantage of naïve MoD civil servants who didn't get a price put into the contract for the conversion work. Bernard Gray, chief of defence materiel, told Parliament in 2013: Because the decision to go STOVL [that is the initial decision for jumpjets] was taken in, from memory, 2002, no serious work had been done. It had been noodled in 2005, but no serious work had been done on it. It was not a contract-quality offer; it was a simple assertion that that could be done, but nobody said, "It can be done at this price", and certainly nobody put that in a contract. The US woes with EMALS are not complete showstoppers. EMALS is a new design, technology and piece of equipment, up against mature steam-powered catapult tech which hasn't really changed in more than five decades. Gerald R. Ford is the first-of-class of the new breed of US aircraft carriers which will see that country's navy through to the second half of this century. That said, the fact that problems identified in 2014 are still a problem two years later, and make it impossible to safely deploy fully-loaded combat aircraft, may come back to bite the US Navy. Oddly, Gerald R. Ford's timetable for introduction into service – handover to the USN early this year, flight testing in 2018 and 2019, and operational deployment by 2021 – closely mirrors that of HMS Queen Elizabeth. Britain's new aircraft carriers have no catapult system at all. The only fast jets capable of flying from them are Harriers (as operated by the US Marine Corps) and the F-35B. HMS Queen Elizabeth, whose sea trials date keeps slipping back to later and later this year, is planned to carry about 20 F-35s on her first operational deployment to the South China Sea in 2021. Sources tell The Register that plans to operate F-35s from land bases once they are delivered to the UK have been shelved in favour of getting Queen Elizabeth to sea with as large an air wing as possible. Previously, military planners were working on the assumption that just 12 jets would be carried aboard QE on her first operational deployment, with the rest left in the UK for the RAF to play with. Sponsored: Next gen cybersecurity. Visit The Register's security hub