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Spying on apps like WhatsApp using smartphone spyware would have gone too far, say Austrian politicians.
Tabatha von Kouml;lichen has been appointed as Regional Sales Director DACH to lead the initiative Munich, GERMANY, 20 July 2017 – Cambium Networkstrade;, a leading global provider of trusted wireless solutions that connect the unconnected, today announced the appointment of Tabatha von Kouml;lichen as its Regional Sales Director for the regions of Germany, Austria, Switzerland (DACH), reporting to Alessio Murroni, Senior Sales Director for Europe.Based in Munich, Germany, von Kouml;lichen will drive sales of Cambium... Source: RealWire
Austria has asked experts for ideas on how to draft laws so police can spy on messaging apps like WhatsApp and Skype for criminal activity.
LONDON – 13 June, 2017 - Basefarm today announced their acquisition of the Berlin-based The unbelievable Machine Company (*um), the leading service provider for Big Data, cloud and managed cloud services in Germany and Austria. With the acquisition, Basefarm extends their target market from the Nordics and the Netherlands to include Germany and Austria, thus becoming a leading European player. The combined business will have ~100m€ in revenues this year in addition to a wider... Source: RealWire
As part of this report, we analyze the collected data in our quest for the answer to the question of what interests the current generation of children online.
Wien/Walldorf, May 2nd 2017 – On the 11th and 12th of May of this year, over 3,000 developers, IT specialists, IT managers, and IT leaders, will come together at Austria’s largest developers conference (www.wearedevelopers.org), discussing the newest developments on the Web, as well as on the software market.

The aicomp group is a strongly growing software and consulting company, and as a partner, exhibitor, and presenter, we bring information and information seekers together.Inspiration through exchangeOn... Source: RealWire

Spam and phishing in 2016

2016 saw a variety of changes in spam flows, with the increase in the number of malicious mass mailings containing ransomware being the most significant.

These programs are readily available on the black market, and in 2017 the volume of malicious spam is unlikely to fall.
Augsburg, 01/26/2017 – baramundi software – a leading provider of endpoint management solutions – today announced it grew its sales by more than 20 percent compared to 2015.
In addition, it welcomed more than 400 new customers across Europe and 2 UK partners.
In order to keep up with business growth and surging customer demand, the company also hired 21 new employees and opened a branch in Vienna, Austria, in line with its expansion plans."We... Source: RealWire
SGX needs I/O protection, Austrian boffins reckon Intel's Software Guard Extensions started rolling in Skylake processors in October 2015, but it's got an Achilles heel: insecure I/O like keyboards or USB provide a vector by which sensitive user data could be compromised. A couple of boffins from Austria's Graz University of Technology reckon they've cracked that problem, with an add-on that creates protected I/O paths on top of SGX. Instead of the handful of I/O technologies directly protected by SGX – most of which have to do with DRM rather than user security – the technology proposed in Samuel Weiser and Mario Werner's Arxiv paper, SGXIO, is a “generic” trusted I/O that can be applied to things like keyboards, USB devices, screens and so on. And we're not talking about a merely esoteric technology that might soothe the fears of people running cloud apps on multi-tenant infrastructure. The Weiser/Werner proposal would create an SGX-supported trusted path all the way to a remote user's browser to protect (for example) an online banking session – and provide “attestation mechanisms to enable the bank as well as the user to verify that trusted paths are established and functional.” SGXIO as a way to protect a banking app The shortcoming SGXIO is trying to fix is that SGX's threat model considers everything outside itself a threat (which isn't a bad thing, in context). The usual approach for trusted paths is to use encrypted interfaces. The paper mentions the Protected Audio Video Path (PAVP) – but that's a DRM-specific example, and most I/O devices don't encrypt anything. Hence SGXIO, an attempt to add a generic trusted path to the SGX environment – and with that trusted path reaching to the end user environment, it's an attempt to protect an application from nasties like keyloggers that a miscreant might have installed on a victim's box. The key architectural concepts in SGXIO are: A trusted stack – which contains a security hypervisor, secure I/O drivers, and the trusted boot (TB) enclave; and The virtual machine – hosting an untrusted operating system that runs secure user applications. A user application communicating with the end user: 1. Opens an encrypted channel to the secure I/O driver; 2. This tunnels through the untrusted operating system, and establishes secure communication with the “generic” user I/O device. The hypervisor binds user devices exclusively to I/O; I/O on unprotected devices passes directly through the hypervisor; the trusted path names both the encrypted user-app-to-driver communication; and the exclusive driver-to-device binding; The TB enclave provides assurance of the trusted path setup, by attesting the hypervisor. The paper illustrates this process like this: SGXIO's trusted stack components An implementation wouldn't be seamless: the SGXIO paper devices a fair chunk of copy to application design, enclave programming (fortunately something Intel provides resources for), driver design, and hypervisor choice. Application developers, for example, have to work out a key exchange mechanism (Diffie-Hellman is supported, and SGXIO offers its own lightweight key protocol). For hypervisors, the paper suggests the seL4 microkernel. Originally developed by Australia's NICTA and now handled by the CSIRO Data61 project, seL4 is a mathematically verified software kernel that was published as open source software in 2014. SGXIO will get its first public airing at the CODASPY'17 conference in March, being held in Scottsdale Arizona. ® Sponsored: Customer Identity and Access Management

Tony Evans from Wick Hill (part of the Nuvias Group) highlights the risks of Wi-Fi and provides some advice for delivering a secure hotspot

The fact that Wi-Fi stands for Wireless Fidelity hints at how long Wi-Fi has been around, but it was only in 1999 that the Wi-Fi Alliance formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark, under which most products are sold.

Today, Wi-Fi is on the top of the list of must-haves for businesses of all types and sizes. People will simply vote with their feet if good and, usually free, Wi-Fi is not available.

But this demand for anytime, anyplace connectivity can mean that some of us are prepared to jump onto Wi-Fi hotspots at cafes, hotel, airports or company guest networks, with only a fleeting consideration of security – a fact that has not gone unnoticed by cyber criminals.

There are over 300,000 videos on YouTube alone explaining how to hack Wi-Fi users with tools easily found online.

Risks from unprotected Wi-Fi:

Wi-Fi Password Cracking
Wireless access points that still use older security protocols such as WEP, make for easy targets because these passwords are notoriously easy to crack. Hotspots that invite us to log in by simply using social network credentials are increasingly popular, as they allow businesses to use demographic information such as age, gender and occupation to target personalised content and advertisements.

Eavesdropping
Without encryption, Wi-Fi users run the risk of having their private communications intercepted, or packet sniffed, by cyber snoops while on an unprotected network.

Rogue Hotspots
Cyber criminals can set up a spoof access point near your hotspot with a matching SSID that invites unsuspecting customers to log in leaving them susceptible to unnoticed malicious code injection.
In fact, it is possible to mimic a hotspot using cheap, portable hardware that fits into a backpack or could even be attached to a drone.

Planting Malware
There are common hacking toolkits to scan a Wi-Fi network for vulnerabilities, and customers who join an insecure wireless network may unwittingly walk away with unwanted malware.

A common tactic used by hackers is to plant a backdoor on the network, which allows them to return at a later date to steal sensitive information.

Data Theft
Joining an insecure wireless network puts users at risk of losing documents that may contain sensitive information.
In retail environments, for example, attackers focus their efforts on extracting payment details such as credit card numbers, customer identities and mailing addresses.

Inappropriate and Illegal Usage
Businesses offering guest Wi-Fi risk playing host to a wide variety of illegal and potentially harmful communications.

Adult or extremist content can be offensive to neighbouring users, and illegal downloads of protected media leave the businesses susceptible to copyright infringement lawsuits.

Bad Neighbours
As the number of wireless users on the network grows, so does the risk of a pre-infected client entering the network. Mobile attacks, such as Android’s Stagefright, can spread from guest to guest, even if the initial victim is oblivious to the threat.

Best practices
There are established best practices to help secure your Wi-Fi network, alongside a drive, from companies such as WatchGuard, to extend well-proven physical network safeguards to the area of wireless, providing better network visibility to avoid blind spots.

Implementing the latest WPA2 Enterprise (802.1x) security protocol and encryption is a must, while all traffic should, at a minimum, be inspected for viruses and malware, including zero day threats and advanced persistent threats.

Application ID and control will monitor and optionally block certain risky traffic, while web content filtering will prevent unsuspecting users from accidentally clicking a hyperlink that invites exploitation, malware and backdoors to be loaded into your network.

The use of strong passwords, which are changed frequently, should be encouraged, along with regular scanning for rogue Access Points (APs) and whitelisting MAC addresses, when possible.

WatchGuard’s latest cloud-managed wireless access points also have built-in WIPS (Wireless Intrusion Prevention System) technology to defend against unauthorised devices, rogue APs and malicious attacks, with close to zero false positives.

While WIDs (Wireless Intrusion Detection Systems) are common in many Wi-Fi solutions, WIDs require manual intervention to respond to potential threats.

This may be OK for large organisations with IT teams that can manage this, however WIPs is a fully-automated system, which makes it far more attractive to SMEs and organisations such as schools and colleges.

Using patented, Marker Packet wireless detection technology, WatchGuard WIPS differentiates between nearby external access points and rogue access points.
If a rogue access point is detected, all incoming connections to that access point are instantly blocked. WIPS also keeps a record of all clients connecting to the authorised access points, so if a known device attempts to connect to a malicious access point, the connection is instantly blocked. WIPS will also shut down denial-of-service attacks by continuously looking for abnormally high amounts of de-authentication packets.

Wi-Fi as a marketing tool
While Wi-Fi networks have traditionally been viewed as part of the IT infrastructure and the responsibility of the IT department, the latest Wi-Fi systems deliver more than just connectivity, which makes them an attractive proposition for customer services and marketing departments.

For example, the WatchGuard Wi-Fi Cloud provides visibility into marketing data, including insights into footfall and customer demographics and also makes it possible to have direct communication with individual customers in the form of SMS, MMS or social networks.

And with customised splash pages, businesses can personalise the customer Wi-Fi experiences by offering promotional opportunities or surveys and promoting all-important branding.

It is clear that Wi-Fi is here to stay and is becoming much more than simply a way to get online. While the rapid speed of Wi-Fi adoption has led to a disconnect between physical and wireless security, this is now changing and there is no longer any excuse for providing insecure Wi-Fi.

ENDS

About Wick Hill
Established in 1976, value added distributor Wick Hill specialises in secure IP infrastructure solutions.

The company sources and delivers best-of-breed, easy-to-use solutions through its channel partners, with a portfolio that covers security, performance, access, networking, convergence, storage and hosted solutions.

Wick Hill is particularly focused on providing a wide range of value-added support for its channel partners.

This includes strong lead generation and conversion, technical and consultancy support, and comprehensive training. Wick Hill has its headquarters in the UK and offices in Germany and Austria. Wick Hill also offers services to channel partners in fourteen EMEA countries and worldwide, through its association with Zycko, as part of Nuvias Group, the pan-EMEA, high value distribution business, which is redefining international, specialist distribution in IT.

For further press information, please contact Annabelle Brown on 01326 318212, email pr@wickhill.com Wick Hill https://www.wickhill.com

A vulnerability in cryptsetup, a utility used to set up encrypted filesystems on Linux distributions, could allow an attacker to retrieve a root rescue shell on some systems. From there, an attacker could have the ability to copy, modify, or destroy a hard disk, or use the network to exfiltrate data. Cryptsetup, a utility used to setup disk encryption based on the dm-crypt kernel module, is usually deployed in Debian and Ubuntu. Researchers warned late last week that if anyone uses the tool to encrypt system partitions for the operating systems, they’re likely vulnerable. Two researchers, Hector Marco of the University of the West of Scotland and Ismael Ripoll, of the Polytechnic University of Valencia, in Spain, disclosed the vulnerability on Friday at DeepSec, a security conference held at the Imperial Riding School Renaissance Vienna Hotel in Austria. According to the researchers, the script with the vulnerability (CVE-2016-4484) is in the Debian cryptsetup package 2:1.7.2-3 and earlier. Systems that use Dracut, an infrastructure commonly deployed on Fedora in lieu of initramfs – a simple RAM file system directory, are also vulnerable, according to the researchers. The pair say additional Linux distributions outside of Debian and Ubuntu may be vulnerable, they just haven’t tested them yet. The problem stems from the incorrect handling of a password check when a partition is ciphered with LUKS, or Linux Unified Key Setup, a disk encryption specification that’s standard for Linux. Assuming an attacker has access to the computer’s console, when presented with the LUKS password prompt, they could exploit the vulnerability simply by pressing ‘Enter’ over and over again until a shell appears. The researchers say the exploit could take as few as 70 seconds. After a user exceeds the maximum number of three password tries, the boot sequence continues normally. Another script in the utility doesn’t realize this, and drops a BusyBox shell. After carrying out the exploit, the attacker could obtain a root initramfs, or rescue shell. Since the shell can be executed in the initrd, or initial ram disk, environment, it can lead to a handful of scary outcomes, including elevation of privilege, information disclosure, or denial of service. The researchers warn that the vulnerability is especially dangerous in public situations. “This vulnerability is specially serious in environments like libraries, ATMs, airport machines, labs, etc, where the whole boot process is protect (password in BIOS and GRUB) and we only have a keyboard or/and a mouse,” the vulnerability disclosure reads. All an attacker would need in those instances – assuming the system is running Linux – would be access to the keyboard or mouse, Marco and Ripoll say. Tourist information kiosks or airport check in kiosks could be prime targets, the two write. While an attacker would have to have physical access to carry out the attack in most instances, the two warn that in some cloud environments, like those deployed by Ubuntu, the vulnerability could be exploited without physical access. Users can remedy the vulnerability by fixing the cryptroot script file – /scripts/local-top/cryptroot – directly, suspending execution forever, according to the researchers. It’s unclear when a true fix will make its way to the Linux distributions. Neither Debian or Ubuntu immediately returned a request for comment on the vulnerability Tuesday. Marco and Ripoll claim they reported the issue to Debian two weeks ago and while the distribution fixed it, the researchers claim they don’t fully agree with the way it did it. “This is just one of the problems that the boot sequence has in GNU/Linux. It is too permissive on errors, that is. There is the general idea that if the user has physical access to the computer, then the user IS THE OWNER of the computer (this dates from the very beginning of computing). The IoT will dramatically change this assumption,” Marco and Ripoll told Threatpost. “When Windows detects an error… it just shows the blue screen… which is very bad if you are a developer but it is the best solution for 99.9% of the users. Shall the system be developer/hacker friendly, or user secure?”