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DNS record will help prevent unauthorized SSL certificates

In a few months, publicly trusted certificate authorities will have to start honoring a special Domain Name System (DNS) record that allows domain owners to specify who is allowed to issue SSL certificates for their domains.The Certification Authority Authorization (CAA) DNS record became a standard in 2013 but didn't have much of a real-world impact because certificate authorities (CAs) were under no obligation to conform to them.[ Expand your security career horizons with these essential certifications for smart security pros. | Discover how to secure your systems with InfoWorld's Security Report newsletter. ]The record allows a domain owner to list the CAs that are allowed to issue SSL/TLS certificates for that domain.

The reason for this is to limit cases of unauthorized certificate issuance, which can be accidental or intentional, if a CA is compromised or has a rogue employee.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

DMCA “safe harbor” up in the air for online sites that...

Etsy, Kickstarter, Pinterest, and Tumblr say site moderation hangs in the balance.

Trump ‘actively’ considering new H-1B spouse work rule

President Donald Trump’s administration has decided to “actively reconsider” an Obama-era rule allowing certain H-1B spouses to hold jobs, according to court documents filed Monday.
It is asking the court to give it until September to consider changing the H-4 work authorization rule.This is becoming a high-stakes case for approximately 180,000 spouses of H-1B visa holders who gained the right to work in 2014.

These are spouses of H-1B visa holders who are seeking a green card.[ Have a tech story to share? If we publish it, we’ll send you a $50 American Express gift card — and keep you anonymous.
Send it to offtherecord@infoworld.com. | We've all been there: 7 hardware horror stories from the help desk. | Follow Off the Record on Twitter and subscribe to the newsletter. ]
The motion was filed in a Washington federal appellate court, under the case name Save Jobs USA, in a case brought by former Southern California Edison (SCE) IT workers.

These workers trained visa-holding replacements in 2015 before losing their jobs.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CD, DVD pirate sentenced to 5 years in prison

FBI investigated piracy ring with assistance from the RIAA and MPAA.

Elon Musk on new NASA legislation: “This bill changes almost nothing”

"Existing programs stay in place and there is no added funding for Mars."

President Trump signs NASA advisory bill, says it’s “about jobs”

On deep space: "That sounds exciting.

But first we want to fix our highways."

VU#742632: Sage XRT Treasury database fails to properly restrict access to...

Sage XRT Treasury,version 3,fails to properly restrict database access to authorized users,which may enable any authenticated user to gain full access to privileged database functions.

Mobile apps and stealing a connected car

The concept of a connected car, or a car equipped with Internet access, has been gaining popularity for the last several years.

By using proprietary mobile apps, it is possible to get some useful features, but if a car thief were to gain access to the mobile device that belongs to a victim that has the app installed, then would car theft not become a mere trifle?

What links macOS, iOS, Safari, tvOS, watchOS? They all need patching

Apple squashes a bunch of security bugs, so get installing Apple has emitted a set of software security updates for all of its major operating systems. The patches address holes in iOS, macOS, Safari, iCloud for Windows, watchOS, and tvOS. For iPhone and iPad users, Apple has kicked out iOS 10.2.1, addressing a total of 18 CVE-listed vulnerabilities, including a bug that caused the iPhone's auto-unlock feature to unlock when it shouldn't. You can pair an Apple Watch with an iThing so that, when the smartwatch is being worn and nearby, the handheld will automatically unlock. Unfortunately, a bug allows the auto-lock to unlock even if the watch isn't being worn. "Auto Unlock may unlock when Apple Watch is off the user's wrist," said Apple in its advisory. Also patched in the update were two remote code execution flaws in the iOS Kernel and 12 CVE-listed vulnerabilities in WebKit, the browser engine Apple uses for both iOS and Safari. On the Mac, Apple has issued the macOS Sierra 10.12.3 update to patch a total of 11 CVE-listed vulnerabilities, including three flaws in PHP, a use-after-free vulnerability in the macOS Bluetooth component, and two remote code execution bugs in Kernel. Mac users are being advised to update Safari to version 10.0.3.

That update, which is also being offered for Macs running Yosemite and El Capitan, sports fixes for a total of 12 flaws, 11 in WebKit. The largest update, in terms of bugs fixed, is watchOS 3.1.3, containing updates for 33 CVE-listed security flaws.

These include a hole that left an App's authorization settings on the Watch after an uninstall, the Auto Unlock bug (also addressed in the iOS update), and a denial-of-service error in the Watch's kernel – whose discovery was credited to the UK's National Cyber Security Centre. For the AppleTV, Cupertino has kicked out tvOS 10.1.1.

That release includes fixes for 12 CVE-listed vulnerabilities, nine of them in WebKit.

AppleTV owners can get the update through the Software Update tool in the TV's Settings App. Finally, for those using iCloud for Windows, Apple has posted the 6.1.1 update to address four WebKit flaws present in the Windows client, all of which could potentially be targeted for remote code execution attacks. ® Sponsored: Continuous lifecycle London 2017 event.

DevOps, continuous delivery and containerisation. Register now

GitHub Bug Bounty Program Continues to Pay Rewards

GitHub celebrates the third anniversary of its Bug Bounty program, with bonus rewards for security disclosures, as the program continues to help the popular code development platform stay secure. In January 2014, the GitHub distributed version control code repository first launched a bug bounty program, rewarding security researchers for responsibly disclosing software vulnerabilities. Now three years later in January 2017, GitHub is celebrating the third anniversary of its bug bounty program, with bonus rewards for the top submissions made in January and February.The current GitHub bug bounty platform runs on the HackerOne platform. Greg Ose, GitHub’s Application Security Engineering Manager explained that GitHub moved to HackerOne in April 2016."We have developed API integrations with HackerOne to kick off our internal triage with developers and to maintain our bounty website at bounty.github.com," Ose told eWEEK. "Bounty.github.com still includes our program's leaderboard and detailed write-ups for submissions."Over its three year existence, the bug bounty program has worked out well for both GitHub and participating security researchers. In the first two years of the program, GitHub paid out a total of $95,300 in bug bounties across 102 submissions. Ose noted that in the third year of the program, GitHub paid out a total of $81,700 for 73 submissions. Looking at all the different issues that have come into the bug bounty program, there have been several that have really stood out. Ose said that one issue that helped define a major focus area for application security at GitHub was a report that was received in February 2014. The report detailed a dangerous Cross-Site-Scripting (XSS) vulnerability on the main GitHub.com website. "We had worked to harden GitHub.com against various cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks using a, then recent, browser feature called Content Security Policy (CSP)," Ose explained. "The submitter was able to not only demonstrate a content injection vulnerability within GitHub.com, but also detailed a bypass to our existing CSP to allow JavaScript execution."After fixing the issue, GitHub used the vulnerability as an example to lock down the restrictions enforced by CSP and to implement new browser security features. Ose said that the new features aim to help prevent content injection vulnerabilities from escalating to JavaScript execution or to the exfiltration of sensitive information from GitHub's web pages. He added that GitHub's engineering team has been documenting some its CSP efforts online and the plan is to publish additional details of protections GitHub has continued to implement.While GitHub is an online repository for projects, at its core, the site makes use of the open-source Git version control system, originally developed by Linux creator Linus Torvalds."While less common than submissions in our web applications, we have received, paid out, and fixed vulnerabilities in Git," Ose said. "Luckily, a number of core Git developers are also employees at GitHub so we've been able to quickly contribute fixes for these issues upstream." Anniversary Contest For the third anniversary of the GitHub bug bounty program, there is a contest that will award additional prize money for the best security reports. Ose said that the contest will end on February 28th, 2017, with the most severe vulnerabilities reported winning the top prizes. The top prize in the contest is a $12,000 award, second place is $8,000 and third prize is $5,000."Typically, vulnerabilities such as SQL injection, gaps in authorization, and system level vulnerabilities, like remote code execution, net the highest severity and payouts," Ose said.Additionally Ose noted that GitHub has also set aside a $5,000 reward for the best report. He explained that sometimes GitHub receives reports that might not have the biggest technical impact, but that are unique in their nature or just really well described by the reporter.Looking forward, Ose said that GitHub is always looking to expand its bug bounty program, both in application scope as well as participation by the security community. For example, in January 2017, the program now includes the GitHub Enterprise platform as a target for security researchers."We will also be launching very focused bug bounties, with increased payouts, for specific features of our applications," Ose said. "For example, as we utilize new browser security features, we would like researchers to focus on these specific protections.""Submissions in these focused areas allow us to not only improve our implementation, but also help us contribute back best practices to other development and application security teams," he said.Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at eWEEK and InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Passwords: A long goodbye

The campaign to eliminate passwords has been ongoing, and growing, for close to a decade.

There are even some declarations that this might be the year, or at least ought to be the year, that it happens. Don’t hold your breath.

Brett McDowell, executive director of the FIDO (Fast IDentity Online) Alliance, is as passionate an advocate of eliminating passwords as anyone. He says that day is coming, given the creation of a, “new generation of authentication technology” largely based on biometrics, and a “massive collaboration among hundreds of companies” to define standards for that technology. The goal of FIDO, a nonprofit created in 2012, is to supplant passwords with what it calls, “an open, scalable, interoperable set of mechanisms,” for secure authentication. But McDowell said last fall, and said again this past week that passwords will, “have a long tail,” that is unlikely to disappear anytime soon – certainly not this year. There are a number of reasons for that, even though the security problems with passwords are well known and well documented.

As Phil Dunkelberger, CEO of Nok Nok Labs, put it, “the username and password paradigm is fundamentally broken.
It was never designed for, and is inherently incapable of addressing, the use cases of modern society. “ Brett McDowell, executive director, FIDO Alliance And of course it is not just technology that has made it easier for attackers to compromise them. Users frequently make it ridiculously easy as well.

They use short, simple passwords that wouldn’t even take a machine to guess – like “admin,” “password,” “12345,” etc.

They continue to use the same user name and password for multiple sites, since they know they won’t be able to remember a couple dozen of them. The latest Verizon Data Breach Incident Report (DBIR) found that 63 percent of all data breaches involved the use of stolen, weak or default passwords. And even if users do have somewhat rigorous passwords, far too many can still be tricked into giving them away through social engineering attacks. Yet, passwords are such an embedded part of authentication systems – most popular websites still use them – that, as McDowell said, it will take considerable time for them to disappear. Or as Scott Simkin, senior group manager, threat intelligence cloud & security subscriptions at Palo Alto Networks, put it, “We have decades of legacy systems and behavior to change, and it will take years for the industry to catch up.” Joe Fantuzzi, CEO, RiskVision Beyond that, there are at least some in the security community who say we should be careful what we wish for.

They note that cyber criminals have always found a way around every advance in security.
So while biometric credentials – fingerprints, iris scans, voice recognition etc. – are much tougher to compromise than passwords, they may not be a magic bullet.

And if attackers can find ways to steal or spoof them, those will obviously be much more difficult to change or update than a password. Indeed, there have already been multiple reports of biometric spoofing.

FireEye reported more than a year ago that fingerprint data could be stolen from Android devices made by Samsung, Huawei, and HTC because, “the fingerprint sensor on some devices is only guarded by the ‘system’ privilege instead of root, making it easier to target and quietly collect the fingerprint data of anyone who uses the sensor.” The Japan Times reported earlier this month that a team at Japan’s National Institute of Informatics (NII) found that a good digital image of people simply flashing the peace sign could result in their fingerprint data being stolen. Researchers have reported that a high-resolution image of a person’s eyes can allow an attacker to make a ”contact lens” of the iris that would pass as the real thing for authentication. And there have already been demonstrations that a manipulated recording of a person’s voice can trick authentication systems. Advocates of biometric authenticators don’t deny any of this, but say one key to their successful use is for the data from them to stay on user devices only, as is the case with Apple’s Touch ID.

As McDowell notes, one of the many problems with passwords is that they are “shared secrets” – they exist not only on users’ devices, but also have to be given to a website’s server, which then matches them with what is stored in its database. When such a server gets compromised, millions of passwords get stolen at the same time, through no fault of the user. Zohar Alon, Co-Founder and CEO of Dome9 According to McDowell, the risk of biometric spoofing is “infinitesimal” compared to that of passwords. Since the biometric credential data never leaves the device, “the attacker must steal the phone or computer even to attempt an attack,” he said. “This doesn’t scale, and is therefore not viable for financially-motivated attackers.” James Stickland, CEO of Veridium, agreed. “You can purchase a kit from China for $10 to copy and extract a fingerprint.

This has been shown to work on fingerprint sensors from Touch ID to the device used for the Indian government, and is a problem for almost all but the most expensive sensors,” he said. “But this is a problem only when an attacker has access to the user’s device, so the time window for attack is pretty low.” Of course, not all biometrics remain only on the user device.
Some, such as the fingerprints of millions of people who work, or have worked, for government or that are taken by law enforcement, will be stored on servers. Joe Fantuzzi, CEO of RiskVision, said this might lead to the same risks that plague the healthcare industry, because of its storage of patient data. “Incorporating customer biometric information will essentially make all companies lucrative targets for attacks and ransomware,” he said. But those advocating the “death” of passwords say the other key to secure authentication is what security professionals have been preaching for years: multi-factor authentication. In other words, they are not trying to mandate that biometrics be the sole replacement for passwords.

Dunkelberger, who said the FIDO Alliance is using the authentication technology his firm created, said the core idea, “isn’t to replace passwords with biometrics, but rather to replace passwords with a strong, secure signal of any kind.” McDowell agreed. He said many FIDO implementations do use biometrics for authentication, but that the specifications are “technology agnostic.” It is implementers, he said, who decide what mechanisms it will support.
It could be, “a local PIN code for user verification vs. biometrics if you prefer.” He said FIDO specifications, “allow the use of authenticators built into a device, such as biometrics or a PIN, and/or external, second-factor authenticators, such as a token or a wearable.” The message from Stickland is similar. “The only current defense is multifactor authentication, using two or more biometrics – for example, fingerprint and face, or voice.

At the very least fingerprint plus a long, randomized PIN would be good.” He said his firm created an authentication tool that, “uses a combination of hardware, secure certificates, biometrics, and other information to validate not only the biometric, but every communication between a remote device and a server, basically verifying that not only is the user valid, but the hardware the user is using is also valid.” Simkin also said multifactor authentication, “of which there are many options available today,” should be used, “for all critical resources and applications.

The more time and resources you require attackers to expend, the lower the chances of a successful breach.” Stephen Stuut, CEO of Jumio, said organizations will still have to balance security with convenience, since “friction” in the process of signing on to a site may cause users simply to give up on it. “Companies should focus less on one single technology but rather on the correct combination that meets their business requirements and customer needs,” he said. “Adding too many steps to the process may increase session abandonment, especially on mobile, where attention spans are short.” All of which sounds like, passwords could for some time remain as a part of multi-factor authentication: Something you know, something you have and something you are. Zohar Alon, Co-Founder and CEO of Dome9, said he doesn’t think they will ever disappear. “They remain one of the simplest means of proving identity and gaining access,” he said. “We can design better security with multiple factors of authentication and authorization that are not correlated with each other, that cannot be compromised all at once.” But Stickland said he believes they will eventually become obsolete. “Passwords are painful. We forget them, they are stolen, it’s time consuming to reset them.

At some point, new technology will win.” This story, "Passwords: A long goodbye" was originally published by CSO.

RHBA-2017:0072-1: freeradius bug fix update

Updated freeradius packages that fix one bug are now available for Red HatEnterprise Linux 7. FreeRADIUS is a high-performance and highly configurable free RemoteAuthentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS) server, designed to allowcentralized authentication and authorization for a network.This update fixes the following bug:* Previously, the FreeRADIUS server exported symbols that were conflicting withsymbols defined in the libltdl library. When the FreeRADIUS server tried to opena connection to the MSSQL server using the rlm_sql_odbc interface and UnixODBCwas configured to use the FreeTDS library, the connection failed with thefollowing error message:"undefined symbol: get_vtable"This update renames the conflicting symbols. As a result, connections to MSSQLservers no longer fail in the described situation. (BZ#1394787)Users of freeradius are advised to upgrade to these updated packages, which fixthis bug. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (v. 7) SRPMS: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: 5e96632852397a55278fe7ad2409a29fSHA-256: 59509a3a66c6f70128580d87a3bf62c2f0d6d0ab85091993db83577756c2e27b   PPC: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: aaa2f1fe524aef8201e3772c173e2a34SHA-256: 0b688cafd42eeaa14d54e1e7f9546645d544ee475e9daadd1e02712abeeebcc0 freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc.rpm     MD5: af8723c15c2bfdacd412806d4ed706dcSHA-256: 858a8955723f9166bbeeda8612a57c56bdb7f8ab7634b37a434436ce50b3176b freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: ccbbe1acbcc2f8d6ed89e1163a794e9bSHA-256: 51c4b41197d27cebb8d1ba4f37e4786ba7230eca75cbac931339646213e4cfc1 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc.rpm     MD5: 5711896014d5f0c4e3d4e3401efef6d3SHA-256: 4a1d7c00c22fca5e4b9e3d1e6c6d45792665729be9092b97384ca2215123864e freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: b34c5265db6b567b8afb1cd48f03f64aSHA-256: e73f1521821ba950dd37cf2770486d332f7559207d3085b8b2d607d27d8592eb freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 3f37c3cdbb151bbc7dc67ab48d61e1a4SHA-256: 42c405e19145b88da6463a637b319abbbb29a6e1ec28044f7358a068d1371119 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: eec5c37d9a0ce12b10bbb2f05e9df053SHA-256: 924feb65d3def899c43fb9e87eeb88d56bee385cf7c4dd4dbd7a4f5ddcd28a3b freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 665c19ec33d00d18ee8b687c7a6dea4eSHA-256: cc745bc192933d19251695b3d2256f9e429852306ed95ad4937121bca2d2571e freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 9b2d94a819845f7bd16886e7bc0bf8ccSHA-256: ccb9084b9946b7f0d8cadeb206c8badeae04ac95dfcffd2058ee1ece636c337c freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 2b0026f1992724a1377c724df6c120d5SHA-256: 9451a7592fa6c72e56a1996e682fe30b4d075eed3eb573f865313af961ab25e9 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 9c91489ddc979db2c0e40b243785fc1eSHA-256: 22587e4769f76e26e6cca92216cb2d6459dfd82c90b916dcbe2b89764f7bee1e freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 8c027857f0dbe9bdcaabbb6de55e46b5SHA-256: 7f6c1699bb3db9a8fb9a44abf400949513444590a44ba338e9325c1000f7ad6f freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 73effd27c782ceaf261899457e274c6cSHA-256: 474a9099296e5bf94c27fb964daa30508d9f76c94155d47c1c3870d7e364a3d9 freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: f0877c023811b0f7fcc9a546445e70e3SHA-256: 701b77c5ec0e64fa197be7d20c011ef79a6bad990c2fb6fb09aa99a70b341124 freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 094f5cc85a92eaa7bac692a3e1fd0217SHA-256: c5ea975b4cc148c42d9ae3b00c0caa006afd3eab0f43a0813246401860240776   PPC64LE: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 5e0b1aa1289ffd43554db6275836c90bSHA-256: 07488616dfb9a8264cfc987103540d2dd5dfcc4abef53a2dc0f23c7e8f639bed freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 7e8a996e8d2efdd7c8383a3609c9da14SHA-256: b6652380de08e05cb23871b6c196e6aaf5758f0e6a03569f7d21b9cc0a930158 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: f2bde27a58cb26df2a3564570e7f9d72SHA-256: 9d5ec51588136c246ac1bbd59786a0b08f906f37db5dcab0e699feeb5b1f662c freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 5ee5af5e721f4413b181f8bfec827f55SHA-256: 11355cb8f27d55198bb1ca9428464696d538ab0cb0c1e6d51e8fe3d49fbe1b13 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 7dd0647b8e3ed9eefd25e0df23db3d0eSHA-256: 9d5f61c648cc9b03dbfefa812a7154e2f85977e02400a45a0701dcb5811691ea freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 5df80476f533797412b8ef8eac7fe692SHA-256: 84e2443b283cdbffdbe4235cab0c1ae92c9764381db43d010805954e3c2c780a freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 56b856e3e0e8094641ed6897b11ed69cSHA-256: 86b7b33b399241b27023ff7c202b47fb50aa11b29169b7196d90341dcab0582e freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 435d2f14683a8f51aecc804915fd9942SHA-256: 9bb3cac21d49fb7c715debd28159db6cb7ea1007b1f1f6772586f05f4593c541 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: a71ffb8ed42f59e433a2082431f2fe4aSHA-256: 2deebc15e1bf41f9e6cd8da602d167992078e7276dc6a57deca23e15310f57f3 freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 089e0d939a2c6ff7599cd8e40b312fd2SHA-256: bf87ab72234ed742862c845adf378c03b35457cc6cdfaafb8451b1aa42cd0a96 freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 59276f0ebe8cec373522d9b8872a6ca5SHA-256: 48ad2db3a6fb377ea34fd1b134038e55ebe2bab56103d552fa9844d43ae57bf5 freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: f341c876508f64042ff9362a8677bd7bSHA-256: 67279b74e6698fcc2c5fa374c376fbfc2d11481a4bf6c989980fb4d7f98cea3f freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 02d68a6b80678a76c9bcc57605be1e92SHA-256: e7df4369f9d61f3070299cb38581633084f9cc4e5ad4bd6974693443c0177892   s390x: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 52bae7512435f85815620a39b6a23d0cSHA-256: c7ac534e0457ab9a36d1caff3c087868c3d4fd342c21ca434ce8665108fca58d freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390.rpm     MD5: dc5025ddebe7a513846b3e0462f8603cSHA-256: e5474d9dde2ab8477c154b5399dc78d9aaaf4585b5a6d2938a0d2ae2b9a93fe1 freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 53e7b991142eab1a164767974d75caf3SHA-256: 1997c44040831b5b284f218ae485264ed52c822f86b07ca087028d6757514b48 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390.rpm     MD5: fe3fbd2d654bfc1b128e68a06f069553SHA-256: 0db215de1770b8208649656b01983cb0d1521907b791a3e85bd5ea4383f37303 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 25698d6d169d6f82be0c8aa190efbfa2SHA-256: f58348d68c3203f84c6f6e85f68568d8081cb7a227eac2dc110436ded1cf1d7f freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 39997fd4ccfde71b7717f18c41903697SHA-256: 2a8d8c80d4bb858276abf3cbf1af0995d34103c4d18cf8f55a7b80fe35badb06 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: ff536e3183408bc8a4ca37bd778ea3e4SHA-256: 5074472cdce0cfaedfaf24e5cea1ec565c1aadc693cca11ff10ac2b02c8e7469 freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 0f3aef5fb8d1ec941df5e6e18fcf6b57SHA-256: 3e03e2fbddfba25cc8432dbb363756aa513f749f1366786e92b495e92571896d freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 257cf4050b4681014e9ad1ede2c87d34SHA-256: f4e068f6e8df09d9d531cf814c82dedd661d1bea447c78d97f48260566eaeb90 freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 28f0f21be0e8bed2047899eefaff1775SHA-256: d03d3ec074f3babe3c7f3763330a8879e170b8b0b596c9302932a8bf53d8aab4 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 065ad49d500e22359039caf24bc018ceSHA-256: cc1e6be66254c7fee8856510b0ca3a3b95f05ac008298b6acabf7b9e93cc9210 freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 69f69efd265f4f43f2015262f9516f26SHA-256: b6cc0eb3ff8674e0b01834641bb70fb5daa11878f5088e0e3691a7d361a83fba freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: db9ce18d2a37b07f2882d5ac8a2c588eSHA-256: dd731a73e9374a74d8ff687ec9b97e2ae7da3240da11d061a8b0f3cb0a9a0b99 freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 4f1f259eebf9416466e1475cccb489e3SHA-256: f8b779092fab55a4998e9f5d2b3770794e0a1802eff155f70f390e769a30d57a freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 0a592741e5dde60ae6af76025702f4a8SHA-256: 188580afdbde07c0ed96dce567469265839cb40aeccb765e7bf33368d06c8be2   x86_64: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 324cd05f4175873056337301f5db3f3cSHA-256: 927a28600dfae5f3e469397e86c4cb1d07f8aff07c61485e723c865a1ba3d28a freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 793281bdb20ce03387f32d67064467f8SHA-256: 91b7bb6fa4db6a526999075cefa33e6ec926f250ac9018dffe31322711bb513b freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: b066afb30956a2d756d1dada28987ca3SHA-256: c27eecb51018235c2953922d92b74fe179b564d69ac724a0af1914250b04475f freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 5b287335d4ffd19370f94de6e46c5c08SHA-256: 6f1113ce0bdd687ce87b031a53f7a51323ee88ccd9d0fe4fa60607143b1506b8 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a012dea189d9cd4a934af530ba72cebeSHA-256: 62bf24ca618b1570c4a542260beb765cf831a8710d913b4cfee1b23b294862db freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7de564b3f0a1c0746459b0d76f4c8196SHA-256: 8c46cbf09bf6a8c7c259c7a671018b40e8fee8fc72fe179dce3d6230666b7695 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02b8e1aba5226b78631f8a25eab07594SHA-256: 5a380b1b428df3e9be595910d134026ccfc521d0983477ee3c1d2f9cae60aaa9 freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4bf09d747577ce1dda88437b17c086eeSHA-256: 8da7c2c2f7406a0cf23a396a50b29af8793d3055681017158fa290ae24280761 freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: caf7093d2d0709de3ec9f21a4858b114SHA-256: 7617d687aa3d7b57bf0fc5ad713783431568366de91c7ca7047b2c633d0305ef freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0fd95f2575032c3583b225234ef06b1cSHA-256: 57fe0f68e18003307aa6ea14ec31175e3d71ed98f74e827d6a8569ce73816b01 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7ae05ec955cc1e33ac1b413250eafe15SHA-256: d60bce13100991ada442e837354a4991d7f37d4490f196a786057d6247ceaca2 freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: d65447e7d8d2b01847e10ecb89410dc1SHA-256: bbc0a3e3311b6799c952ae5161724af957025a0e15cdf815d16e104f24092c79 freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 3cbec77f072cc1b2217fd3a90e80a073SHA-256: 95250b415e278dbd7e4dd180d3139d188ac5ce5701f8fd4a28b2ba0ae381b7af freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: f35bb9c0457b1e07a55445c2c8f0a664SHA-256: ba5f154ce7cafd8e4074e644c73d27e2c669504bb394bcb38e490458dcc4789f freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a92a44d1daa697c379a8964dfd593983SHA-256: 945e3cdd8d9ed66857f7982c2a58a627ff607e0c4f4c926a316fcef6395f5074   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server TUS (v. 7.3) SRPMS: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: 5e96632852397a55278fe7ad2409a29fSHA-256: 59509a3a66c6f70128580d87a3bf62c2f0d6d0ab85091993db83577756c2e27b   x86_64: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 324cd05f4175873056337301f5db3f3cSHA-256: 927a28600dfae5f3e469397e86c4cb1d07f8aff07c61485e723c865a1ba3d28a freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 793281bdb20ce03387f32d67064467f8SHA-256: 91b7bb6fa4db6a526999075cefa33e6ec926f250ac9018dffe31322711bb513b freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: b066afb30956a2d756d1dada28987ca3SHA-256: c27eecb51018235c2953922d92b74fe179b564d69ac724a0af1914250b04475f freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 5b287335d4ffd19370f94de6e46c5c08SHA-256: 6f1113ce0bdd687ce87b031a53f7a51323ee88ccd9d0fe4fa60607143b1506b8 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a012dea189d9cd4a934af530ba72cebeSHA-256: 62bf24ca618b1570c4a542260beb765cf831a8710d913b4cfee1b23b294862db freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7de564b3f0a1c0746459b0d76f4c8196SHA-256: 8c46cbf09bf6a8c7c259c7a671018b40e8fee8fc72fe179dce3d6230666b7695 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02b8e1aba5226b78631f8a25eab07594SHA-256: 5a380b1b428df3e9be595910d134026ccfc521d0983477ee3c1d2f9cae60aaa9 freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4bf09d747577ce1dda88437b17c086eeSHA-256: 8da7c2c2f7406a0cf23a396a50b29af8793d3055681017158fa290ae24280761 freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: caf7093d2d0709de3ec9f21a4858b114SHA-256: 7617d687aa3d7b57bf0fc5ad713783431568366de91c7ca7047b2c633d0305ef freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0fd95f2575032c3583b225234ef06b1cSHA-256: 57fe0f68e18003307aa6ea14ec31175e3d71ed98f74e827d6a8569ce73816b01 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7ae05ec955cc1e33ac1b413250eafe15SHA-256: d60bce13100991ada442e837354a4991d7f37d4490f196a786057d6247ceaca2 freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: d65447e7d8d2b01847e10ecb89410dc1SHA-256: bbc0a3e3311b6799c952ae5161724af957025a0e15cdf815d16e104f24092c79 freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 3cbec77f072cc1b2217fd3a90e80a073SHA-256: 95250b415e278dbd7e4dd180d3139d188ac5ce5701f8fd4a28b2ba0ae381b7af freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: f35bb9c0457b1e07a55445c2c8f0a664SHA-256: ba5f154ce7cafd8e4074e644c73d27e2c669504bb394bcb38e490458dcc4789f freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a92a44d1daa697c379a8964dfd593983SHA-256: 945e3cdd8d9ed66857f7982c2a58a627ff607e0c4f4c926a316fcef6395f5074   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation (v. 7) SRPMS: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: 5e96632852397a55278fe7ad2409a29fSHA-256: 59509a3a66c6f70128580d87a3bf62c2f0d6d0ab85091993db83577756c2e27b   x86_64: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 324cd05f4175873056337301f5db3f3cSHA-256: 927a28600dfae5f3e469397e86c4cb1d07f8aff07c61485e723c865a1ba3d28a freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 793281bdb20ce03387f32d67064467f8SHA-256: 91b7bb6fa4db6a526999075cefa33e6ec926f250ac9018dffe31322711bb513b freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: b066afb30956a2d756d1dada28987ca3SHA-256: c27eecb51018235c2953922d92b74fe179b564d69ac724a0af1914250b04475f freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 5b287335d4ffd19370f94de6e46c5c08SHA-256: 6f1113ce0bdd687ce87b031a53f7a51323ee88ccd9d0fe4fa60607143b1506b8 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a012dea189d9cd4a934af530ba72cebeSHA-256: 62bf24ca618b1570c4a542260beb765cf831a8710d913b4cfee1b23b294862db freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7de564b3f0a1c0746459b0d76f4c8196SHA-256: 8c46cbf09bf6a8c7c259c7a671018b40e8fee8fc72fe179dce3d6230666b7695 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02b8e1aba5226b78631f8a25eab07594SHA-256: 5a380b1b428df3e9be595910d134026ccfc521d0983477ee3c1d2f9cae60aaa9 freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4bf09d747577ce1dda88437b17c086eeSHA-256: 8da7c2c2f7406a0cf23a396a50b29af8793d3055681017158fa290ae24280761 freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: caf7093d2d0709de3ec9f21a4858b114SHA-256: 7617d687aa3d7b57bf0fc5ad713783431568366de91c7ca7047b2c633d0305ef freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0fd95f2575032c3583b225234ef06b1cSHA-256: 57fe0f68e18003307aa6ea14ec31175e3d71ed98f74e827d6a8569ce73816b01 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7ae05ec955cc1e33ac1b413250eafe15SHA-256: d60bce13100991ada442e837354a4991d7f37d4490f196a786057d6247ceaca2 freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: d65447e7d8d2b01847e10ecb89410dc1SHA-256: bbc0a3e3311b6799c952ae5161724af957025a0e15cdf815d16e104f24092c79 freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 3cbec77f072cc1b2217fd3a90e80a073SHA-256: 95250b415e278dbd7e4dd180d3139d188ac5ce5701f8fd4a28b2ba0ae381b7af freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: f35bb9c0457b1e07a55445c2c8f0a664SHA-256: ba5f154ce7cafd8e4074e644c73d27e2c669504bb394bcb38e490458dcc4789f freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a92a44d1daa697c379a8964dfd593983SHA-256: 945e3cdd8d9ed66857f7982c2a58a627ff607e0c4f4c926a316fcef6395f5074   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. 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