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Keybase Extension Brings End-to-End Encrypted Chat To Twitter, Reddit, GitHub

A recently released extension for Chrome, developed by the public key crypto database Keybase, brought end-to-end encrypted messaging to several apps this week.

Flagship Samsung Chromebook Pro finally gets a release date: May 28

The Intel-powered Chromebook is coming to a website near you for $550.

IT threat evolution Q1 2017. Statistics

According to KSN data, Kaspersky Lab solutions detected and repelled 479,528,279 malicious attacks from online resources located in 190 countries all over the world.

File antivirus detected a total of 174,989,956 unique malicious and potentially unwanted objects.

Phishing scum going legit to beat browser warnings

Now that Chrome and Firefox call out HTTP, phisherpholk are getting certified Browser-makers' decision to put big red warning lights in the faces of users when they hit sites too slack to use HTTPS is backfiring a little, as crooks are accelerating their use of encryption.…

“Android Go” will strip Android down for ultra-low-budget phones

Android Go extends and continues past efforts to reduce resource usage.

Windows 10 credential theft: Google is working on fix for Chrome...

Google is addressing a problem that allows a crafty credential theft attack on Windows through Chrome's default behavior.

Chrome on Windows has credential theft bug

.SCF files present ID, password to fetch icons for attack file Google's Chrome team is working to fix a credential theft bug that strikes if the browser is running on Microsoft Windows.…

Chrome Browser Hack Opens Door to Credential Theft

Researchers at DefenseCode claim a vulnerability in Googlersquo;s Chrome browser allows hackers to steal credentials and launch SMB relay attacks.

Google Tracker 2017—All the stuff Google has in the works ahead...

Prepare yourself for the big show with our annual giant list of company projects.

Microsoft finally bans SHA-1 certificates in Internet Explorer, Edge

The Tuesday updates for Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge force those browsers to flag SSL/TLS certificates signed with the aging SHA-1 hashing function as insecure.

The move follows similar actions by Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox earlier this year.Browser vendors and certificate authorities have been engaged in a coordinated effort to phase out the use of SHA-1 certificates on the web for the past few years, because the hashing function no longer provides sufficient security against spoofing.[ Safeguard your data! The tools you need to encrypt your communications and web data. • Maximum-security essential tools for everyday encryption. • InfoWorld's encryption Deep Dive how-to report. | Discover how to secure your systems with InfoWorld's Security Report newsletter. ]SHA-1 (Secure Hash Algorithm 1) dates back to 1995 and has been known to be vulnerable to theoretical attacks since 2005.

The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology has banned the use of SHA-1 by U.S. federal agencies since 2010, and digital certificate authorities have not been allowed to issue SHA-1-signed certificates since Jan. 1, 2016, although some exemptions have been made -- for example, for outdated payment terminals.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Google Chrome won’t be allowed on Windows 10 S

Microsoft's newest Windows 10 edition is designed to allow desktop apps that have been converted to packages for the Windows Store.

But a provision in the Store policies blocks desktop browsers like Chrome.
Is it about security, or something else?

Windows 10 S: Too smart for schools alone

When Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella helped introduced Windows 10 S last week, he related a tear-inducing story of how much technology could help poor kids learn in the modern world, citing his own youth in India.

That’s effective for getting media attention, but not so much for succeeding in the market.After struggling for nearly a decade, Google’s Chrome OS recently has begun picking up traction in schools, so of course that’s the new battlefront for technology pundits.

The theory is that whoever wins the school wins the next generation.

That’s provably false: Apple “owned” the education market in the 1980s but never owned the mass market, and IBM “owned” the education market in the 1990s but only very briefly owned the mass market.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here