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According to KSN data, Kaspersky Lab solutions detected and repelled 342, 566, 061 malicious attacks from online resources located in 191 countries all over the world.
Google servers inside Cuba are now live on the internet, marking a major milestone in the country’s communications evolution and promising faster access to Google’s services for Cuban users.The computers are part of Google’s global network of caching servers, which store frequently requested content locally so it doesn’t have to be accessed over long distances.[ Office 365 vs.

Google G Suite: Productivity smackdown • Collaboration smackdown • Management smackdown. | Our guide to Exchange-based tools in Windows, MacOS, iOS, and Android: Desktop Outlook vs. mobile Outlook vs. native apps. ]
That speeds up access in any country but is particularly important in a nation like Cuba, which has relatively low connectivity to the rest of the world.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Can bigger roles for Chris Harris and Rory Reid save the ratings? We hope so.
Newsweek Cuban connection story enrages miscreants It has been an odd day for Newsweek – its main site was taken offline after it published a story claiming a company owned by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump broke an embargo against doing deals with Cuba. The magazine first thought that the sheer volume of interest in its scoop was the cause for the outage, but quickly realized that something more sinister was afoot. The site was being bombarded by junk traffic from servers all around the world, but the majority came from Russia, the editor in chief Jim Impoco has now said. "Last night we were on the receiving end of what our IT chief called a 'massive' DoS [denial of service] attack," he told Talking Points Memo. "As with any DDoS [distributed DoS] attack, there are lots of IP addresses, but the main ones are Russian, though that in itself does not prove anything. We are still investigating." The story, written by staffer Kurt Eichenwald, detailed how former employees of Trump Hotels had arranged a visit to Cuba in 1998 to explore the possibility of joint ventures with the communist regime.

A consultancy company called Seven Arrows made the visit, and the funds to pay for the trip were then allegedly hidden as a charitable expense. Shortly after the story was published, traffic on the site started to rise – as you'd expect in a presidential season with serious allegations being made.

But the traffic count continued to rise and eventually brought the site down. To make clear: @Newsweek posted story on Trump/Cuba. Hackers attacked, took site down. Lots of IP addresses involved. Main ones from Russia. — Kurt Eichenwald (@kurteichenwald) September 30, 2016 As with any DDoS attack, finding the culprit is nearly impossible.

But it appears that the article has pissed off a lot of people who control many Russian servers. ®
EnlargeNewsweek reader comments 95 Share this story Newsweek suspects that attackers took down its site for hours on Thursday in order to bury a story about a company that Donald Trump owned decades ago.

The magazine claims that the company secretly did business in Cuba, even though that was illegal at the time. Newsweek Editor-in-Chief Jim Impoco told Politico: We don’t know everything. We’re still investigating.

But it was a massive DDoS attack, and it took place in the early evening just as prominent cable news programs were discussing Kurt Eichenwald’s explosive investigation into how Donald Trump’s company broke the law by breaking the United States embargo against Cuba. A distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack came, the newsmagazine suggests, in response to its cover story, “How Donald Trump’s company violated the United States embargo against Cuba.” Details about the volume of the attack or what made it sophisticated were not immediately available. On Friday, Eichenwald described it as “a major attack on Newsweek.” Later in the afternoon, Eichenwald tweeted, “Lots of IP addresses involved. Main ones from Russia.” In an e-mail to Ars, Impoco reiterated that the publication is "still investigating” and that investigators have “nothing definitive.

As with any DDoS attack, there are a lot of IP addresses, but the main ones are Russian.” He said it remains too early to say what significance, if any, comes from the large number of Russian IPs. The IPs involved in a DDoS rarely say much about the parties perpetrating the attack, because the addresses are usually connected to computers that have been hacked and are participating in the assault without the end users’ knowledge.

Exceptions occasionally exist, however, as was the case a few years ago when members of the Anonymous hacking collective actively used software known as the Low Orbit Ion Cannon to disrupt government and corporate websites. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has blamed recent hacks on Russia, including one on the Democratic National Committee. Republican presidential candidate Trump said it could be China or “someone sitting on their bed that weighs 400 pounds.” The Newsweek attack comes about a week after KrebsOnSecurity, arguably the world’s most intrepid source of security news, was briefly silenced.

That attack was presumably the work of a handful of individuals who didn’t like a recent series of exposés written by reporter Brian Krebs. Ars described the incident and the record-breaking data assault that brought it on as “a troubling new chapter in the short history of the Internet.” In recent weeks, security experts have uncovered botnets made up of network-connected cameras and other “Internet of Things” devices capable of bombarding a target with more than a terabit per second of junk traffic.

That’s three times bigger than records set just three months ago.
So far, there’s no indication that the attacks on Newsweek are related to previous attacks or contained the same staggering amount of firepower.
Donald Trump’s call for "extreme vetting" of visa applications, as well as the temporary suspension of immigration from certain countries, would raise fees and add delays for anyone seeking a visa, including H-1B visas, immigration experts said. In particular, a plan by Trump, the Republican presidential candidate, to stop issuing visas -- at least temporarily -- "from some of the most dangerous and volatile regions of the world" may make it difficult for a significant number of people to get visas. Data assembled by Computerworld through a Freedom of Information Act request shows foreign workers come from all corners of the world, including "dangerous and volatile regions." Trump outlined his immigration enforcement plan in a speech Monday. In 2014, the U.S. approved more than 370,000 H-1B applications.
Some were new entries, and others were for previously approved workers who were either renewing or updating their status. Of that number, 2,234 of the H-1B visa holders were from Pakistan, a country that might appear on a Trump list.

Another 1,102 approved visa holders were from Iran.

There were 658 H-1B visa holders from Egypt, and 256 were from Syria. (Article continues below chart.) Country of Birth for H-1B Visa Holders Country Frequency INDIA 262,730 CHINA 29,936 CANADA 7,653 PHILIPPINES 6,055 KOREA, SOUTH 5,024 UNITED KINGDOM 3,822 MEXICO 3,216 TAIWAN 2,785 FRANCE 2,570 JAPAN 2,268 PAKISTAN 2,234 NEPAL 1,997 GERMANY 1,895 TURKEY 1,850 BRAZIL 1,831 ITALY 1,497 COLOMBIA 1,491 RUSSIA 1,461 VENEZUELA 1,432 SPAIN 1,329 IRAN 1,102 NIGERIA 1,015 ISRAEL 949 IRELAND 932 KOREA 813 UKRAINE 795 ARGENTINA 778 MALAYSIA 771 SINGAPORE 755 VIETNAM 695 EGYPT 658 ROMANIA 648 BANGLADESH 647 INDONESIA 637 SRI LANKA 608 PERU 583 POLAND 576 AUSTRALIA 564 GREECE 556 SOUTH AFRICA 547 HONG KONG 503 BULGARIA 477 THAILAND 476 LEBANON 462 JAMAICA 461 KENYA 437 NETHERLANDS 432 JORDAN 415 CHILE 395 SWEDEN 374 NEW ZEALAND 353 GHANA 341 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 333 ECUADOR 302 SYRIA 256 PORTUGAL 253 SWITZERLAND 249 BELGIUM 238 DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 231 SAUDI ARABIA 205 ZIMBABWE 205 HUNGARY 203 Spain 189 AUSTRIA 179 UNKNOWN 179 DENMARK 174 HONDURAS 171 COSTA RICA 165 UNITED ARAB EMIRATES 155 BOLIVIA 150 CZECH REPUBLIC 149 GUATEMALA 149 EL SALVADOR 147 SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO 142 KUWAIT 141 MOROCCO 138 ETHIOPIA 133 CAMEROON 126 FINLAND 125 BAHAMAS 123 MOLDOVA 111 KAZAKHSTAN 108 SLOVAK REPUBLIC 103 CROATIA 102 NORWAY 102 ARMENIA 101 UZBEKISTAN 101 PANAMA 99 URUGUAY 94 ALBANIA 88 UGANDA 88 USSR 87 Serbia 86 LIBYA 84 MONGOLIA 83 TANZANIA 83 BURMA 76 NIGER 74 LITHUANIA 70 GEORGIA 66 GRENADA 58 SENEGAL 58 BARBADOS 57 MACEDONIA 56 LATVIA 54 AZERBAIJAN 52 BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA 51 CYPRUS 51 ST. LUCIA 51 IRAQ 50 SLOVENIA 50 BELIZE 48 ICELAND 47 ZAMBIA 47 GUYANA 45 NICARAGUA 45 PARAGUAY 45 BAHRAIN 43 TUNISIA 43 ALGERIA 42 MAURITIUS 42 DOMINICA 40 USA 39 ESTONIA 35 KYRGYZSTAN 34 HAITI 30 RWANDA 28 BURKINA FASO 26 MACAU 25 TURKMENISTAN 25 CAMBODIA 24 COTE D'IVOIRE 24 TAJIKISTAN 24 CONGO 22 ST. KITTS-NEVIS 22 SUDAN 22 MALAWI 21 OMAN 21 ST.
VINCENT/GRENADINES 21 MALI 20 ANTIGUA-BARBUDA 19 BOTSWANA 18 IVORY COAST 18 BERMUDA 17 BENIN 16 AFGHANISTAN 15 Kosovo 15 QATAR 15 LUXEMBOURG 13 MADAGASCAR 13 Montenegro 13 YEMEN-SANAA 13 TOGO 12 SIERRA LEONE 11 YUGOSLAVIA 11 GABON 10 GAMBIA 10 NORTHERN IRELAND 10 MALTA 8 NAMIBIA 8 SURINAME 8 SWAZILAND 8 BHUTAN 7 FIJI 7 FRENCH POLYNESIA 7 MOZAMBIQUE 7 BURUNDI 6 CUBA 6 GUINEA 6 LIBERIA 6 BRUNEI 5 NETHERLANDS ANTILLES 5 ARUBA 4 ERITREA 4 KIRIBATI 4 LESOTHO 4 MALDIVES 4 MAURITANIA 4 ANGOLA 3 CAPE VERDE 3 CHAD 3 DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO 3 SEYCHELLES 3 UNITED STATES 3 ANGUILLA 2 LAOS 2 SOMALIA 2 ARABIAN PENINSULA 1 CAYMAN ISLANDS 1 DJIBOUTI 1 GERMANY, WEST 1 GIBRALTAR 1 GUINEA-BISSAU 1 MARTINIQUE 1 MONACO 1 REUNION 1 Samoa 1 SAO TOME AND PRINCIPE 1 ST.
VINCENT-GRENADINES 1 STATELESS 1 TONGA 1 TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS 1 VANUATU 1 Source: USCIS data for approved applications in fiscal year 2014 Trump's plan to admit only people "who share our values and respect our people" didn't indicate how it would be applied.
It also didn't say whether all visa holders -- visitor, H-1B and green card -- would be subject to an ideological litmus test. And what is the correct answer to such a question about American values? "If you ask people born in this country what is an American ideology, I'm not quite sure that we would come out with one answer," said Jessica Lavariega-Monforti, a professor and chair of the political science department at Pace University in New York. "The immigration system, as it currently stands, could not process additional vetting without creating backlogs and increasing wait times for applicants.

At the same time, it is unclear how these policy changes would increase safety against a terrorist attack," said Lavariega-Monforti. John Lawit, an immigration attorney in Irving, Texas, said the U.S. already has a vetting process that begins as soon as someone applies for a tourist visa.

There are different levels of threat, such as being a citizen of Syria, that trigger a much higher level of vetting, he said. "There is a huge financial commitment that must be made in terms of human resources in order to carry on such a vetting program, and a huge, huge increase in fees,” Lawit said. Requiring oaths of some kind is "a lot of posturing with very little substance," he added, and are ineffective in improving security. Lawit said he once assisted H-1B workers who were employed in non-classified jobs at the Sandia and Los Alamos National Laboratories.

The processing time for security checks could run months.

That's an example of extreme vetting, while "extraordinary detailed security investigations are conducted," he said. This story, "Trump's 'extreme' anti-terrorism vetting may be H-1B nightmare" was originally published by Computerworld.