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Seven months after Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull told ZDNet the laws of Australia will trump the laws of mathematics, Minister for Home Affairs Peter Dutton has discussed looming legislation that would force companies to help the government access co...
Don't pay the miscreants – don't even fix a price Free decryption keys for the Cryakl ransomware were released last Friday – the fruit of an ongoing cybercrime investigation.…
Addition by Belgian National Police and Kaspersky Lab brings number of decryption tools on the No More Ransom portal up to 52.

Denis and Co.

In April 2017, we published a detailed review of a malicious program that used DNS tunneling to communicate to its CC.

That study prompted us to develop a technology to detect similar threats, which allowed us to collect a multitude of malware samples using DNS tunneling.
Coders are rapidly finding exploits to open up Nintendorsquo;s new console.
At the end of September, Palo Alto released a report on Unit42 activity where they – among other things – talked about PYLOT malware. We have been detecting attacks that have employed the use of this backdoor since at least 2015 and refer to it as Travle.

Coincidentally, KL was recently involved in an investigation of a successful attack where Travle was detected, during which we conducted a deep analysis of this malware.
Sites vulnerable to newly revived ROBOT exploit included Facebook and PayPal.
On December 12, 2017, a research paper with the title Return of Bleichenbacher's Oracle Threat was made publicly available.

This paper describes how some Transport Layer Security (TLS) stacks are vulnerable to variations of the classic Bleichenbac...
Welcome to ransomware in 2017 – the year global enterprises and industrial systems were added to the ever-growing list of victims, and targeted attackers started taking a serious interest in the threat. It was also a year of consistently high attack numbers, but limited innovation.

IT threat evolution Q3 2017

Our growing dependence on technology, connectivity and data means that businesses present a bigger attack surface than ever. Targeted attackers have become more adept at exploiting their victimsrsquo; vulnerabilities to penetrate corporate defences while ‘flying under the radarrsquo;.
The P1735 IEEE standard describes methods for encrypting electronic-design intellectual property(IP),as well as the management of access rights for such IP.

The methods are flawed and,in the most egregious cases,enable attack vectors that allow recovery of the entire underlying plaintext IP.
Implementations of IEEE P1735 may be weak to cryptographic attacks that allow an attacker to obtain plaintext intellectual property without the key,among other impacts.
Wi-Fi Protected Access(WPA,more commonly WPA2)handshake traffic can be manipulated to induce nonce and session key reuse,resulting in key reinstallation by a wireless access point(AP)or client.

An attacker within range of an affected AP and client may leverage these vulnerabilities to conduct attacks that are dependent on the data confidentiality protocols being used.

Attacks may include arbitrary packet decryption and injection,TCP connection hijacking,HTTP content injection,or the replay of unicast and group-addressed frames.

These vulnerabilities are referred to as Key Reinstallation Attacks orKRACKattacks.