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BridgeHead and Digia partner to promote shared services in the Finnish...

BridgeHeadrsquo;s HealthStoretrade; will provide the Independent Clinical Archive (ICA) as part of a truly integrated, end-to-end, patient-centric healthcare IT solution from DigiaASHTEAD, UK – 20th June 2017 – BridgeHead Software, the leading healthcare data management provider, today announced that it has partnered with IT service company, Digia Plc, to provide its Independent Clinical Archive (ICA), HealthStoretrade;, also known as a third generation Vendor Neutral Archive (VNA), as part of an end-to-end IT solution for healthcare... Source: RealWire

WannaCry ransomware used in widespread attacks all over the world

Earlier today, our products detected and successfully blocked a large number of ransomware attacks around the world.
In these attacks, data is encrypted with the extension “.WCRYrdquo; added to the filenames. Our analysis indicates the attack, dubbed “WannaCryrdquo;, is initiated through an SMBv2 remote code execution in Microsoft Windows.

Patent-holding company uses ex-Nokia patents to sue Apple, phone carriers

Nokia has spread its patents around widely, and they keep popping up in lawsuits.

The Xbox One loses another exclusive third-party developer

As Remedy goes multi-platform, Microsoft's exclusive slate looks worse and worse.

Kremlin-backed APT28 doesn’t even bother hiding its attacks, says Finnish secret...

Suposta: Espionage rising, attacks on infrastructure falling The Finnish Security Intelligence Service Suposta is complaining that nation-state-level attackers aren’t even bothering to hide themselves from prying eyes.…

Russian Man Pleads Guilty for his Role in Ebury Botnet

Maxim Senakh, arrested by Finnish authorities and extradited to the US, will be sentenced this August.

Ransomware ‘customer support’ chat reveals criminals’ ruthlessness

Ransomware criminals chatting up victims, offering to delay deadlines, showing how to obtain Bitcoin, dispensing the kind of customer support that consumers lust for from their cable and mobile plan providers, PC and software makers?What’s not to love?[ 18 surprising tips for security pros. | Discover how to secure your systems with InfoWorld's Security Report newsletter. ]Finnish security vendor F-Secure yesterday released 34 pages of transcripts from the group chat used by the crafters of the Spora ransomware family.

The back-and-forth not only put a spotlight on the gang’s customer support chops, but, said a company security advisor, illustrated the intertwining of Bitcoin and extortion malware.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

BlackBerry sues Nokia over patents as its phone business shuts down

Also at issue are Nortel patents from the $4.5B "Rockstar Bidco" purchase.

Exotic trip planned? Packing antibiotics may mean bringing home superbugs

Travelers who take antibiotics transport the most drug-resistant of superbugs.

Autocomplete a novel phishing hole for Chrome, Safari crims

Hidden forms capture LastPass autofill Phishers have a new tool in their arsenal with the discovery that web browsers Chrome and Safari along with LastPass will autofill hidden registration form fields. Finnish web developer Viljami Kuosmanen discovered the flaws affecting the world's most popular browser, along with Apple's offering. The attack vector is manifest when victims select autofill while filling out registration forms: attackers hide sensitive fields like street address, date of birth, and phone number, displaying only basic entry boxes like name and email. Users who type the start of their names will generate a prompt that when selected will throw an option to fill out their complete details. If clicked on a phishing site Kuosmanen describes, a user's sensitive information will be entered into boxes the user cannot see. Kuosmanen tweeted a gif of the attack in action to inform the security community of the novel attack vector. Users can test their browser and extension autofill using his proof of concept site. He told Bleeping Computer that Safari did a better job than Chrome at informing users of the fields that would be enetered, but was still suspetible. Mozilla engineer Daneil Veditz says Mozilla is not vulnerable to the attack vector since it does not autocomplete forms and forces users to manually select prefill data for each box. This is why I don't like autofill in web forms. #phishing #security #infosec pic.twitter.com/mVIZD2RpJ3 — Viljami Kuosmanen ⭐ (@anttiviljami) January 4, 2017 It is on the cards as a pending feature, however. The Register has found popular cloud security vault LastPass will autocomplete hidden forms when selected by users. The company has been notified. Autofilling credit card and financial data forms will trigger additional prompts and extra warnings on Chrome when sites do not offer HTTPS. ® Sponsored: Next gen cybersecurity. Visit The Register's security hub

The most dramatic patent and copyright cases of 2016

reader comments 6 Share this story Many of the biggest legal disputes in technology relate to "intellectual property," a broad term used for laws relating to everything from copyrights to patents, trademarks to trade secrets.

This year saw significant changes in the copyright and patent landscapes. "Patent trolls" who sue technologists for fun and profit got smacked down by courts more often—and harder—than ever before.

At the same time, universities were filing patent lawsuits at an increased rate, and often winning.In the copyright realm, the Oracle v.

Google
trial dominated the spring.

A jury was left to decide the murky rules about when using an API could be "fair use." That legal uncertainty led to the two tech giants clashing over the ethics of each others' business practices and the history of the smartphone industry. In two very different cases in 2016, copyright issues led to criminal charges being filed. US authorities are seeking to extradite and put on trial a man named Artem Vaulin, who they say made $16 million annually by running a massive online storehouse of pirated films and songs.

And more than three years after they were condemned by a federal judge, lawyers behind a vast array of copyright lawsuits, a firm known as Prenda Law, were arrested and accused of fraud. Here's a look back at 2016's most dramatic IP cases. Graphiq CEO Kevin O'Connor and former director of operations Danny Seigle.

Graphiq (formerly FindTheBest) became the first company to win attorneys' fees in a patent case under the Supreme Court's new Octane Fitness standard.

An appeals court approved the fee award in January 2016. Patent trolls continued to face stiff fines throughout 2016. eDekka, the most litigious patent company just a year ago, collapsed and dropped its appeal after being hit with fees in East Texas. Carnegie Mellon University ended a prolonged patent battle with Marvell Technology in February, with Marvell agreeing to pay a $750 million settlement—the largest payout ever for a patent related to computer science. Pictured here is CMU Professor José Moura, inventor on the two patents in the case. An image explaining one of two patents owned by Carnegie Mellon University, which describe a method of reducing noise when reading data from hard disks.

The patents were used by CMU to sue Marvell Technology. Universities have increasingly been willing to become plaintiffs in high-stakes patent lawsuits, and are sometimes partnering with professional patent enforcement companies to do so.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation launched a "reclaim invention" campaign in June 2016, seeking to pressure universities not to partner with such "patent trolls." Since the US Supreme Court's 2014 Alice v.

CLS Bank
decision, it's been easier to get software patents thrown out of court. Until this year, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit had only upheld software patents in one post-Alice case.

But in 2016, the Federal Circuit gave approval to software patents in three more cases.

The image above is pulled from the McRo v.

Bandai Namco Games
opinion.

A Federal Circuit panel said McRo's digital animation patents could survive, rejecting arguments from public interest groups like EFF that McRo was being allowed to essentially patent mathematics. In May, a second jury trial between Oracle and Google over whether the Android operating system violated Java copyrights ended with a second resounding win for Google.

The testimony of Jonathan Schwartz, former president of Sun MicroSystems, loomed large in the case.
Schwartz testified that he had no problem with Android, since Google had followed the rules around Java intellectual property that Sun had established. Noah Berger/Bloomberg via Getty Images Oracle attorneys tried to sway the jury by painting former Sun Microsystems president Jonathan Schwartz as a hypocrite, who praised Google in public but privately decried its licensing practices.
It didn't work.

Above is a slide from Oracle's closing argument. In June, a Los Angeles federal jury considered whether or not Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" was ripped off from a song by psychedelic rock band Spirit.

The jury found in Led Zeppelin's favor, quelling some fears that the music industry may continue to be plagued with copyright lawsuits over similar-sounding songs.

The case followed a high-profile 2015 trial in which a jury found that the hit song "Blurred Lines" infringed the copyright of Marvin Gaye's "Got to Give it Up." In July, US prosecutors charged Artem Vaulin, a 30-year-old Ukrainian man, with criminal copyright infringement for running the popular website KickAssTorrents.
Vaulin was arrested and is being held in Poland awaiting extradition.
It's the highest profile criminal copyright case since the US charged Kim Dotcom—who's still living in New Zealand, where he's desperately hoping to avoid extradition.

Above is a screenshot of the now-shuttered torrent website. On July 21, the Electronic Frontier Foundation filed a lawsuit that's been a long time coming.

EFF claims that the DMCA's ban on circumventing digital locks violates the First Amendment.

Digital locks may need to be sidestepped "in order to create a running critical commentary on... a political debate, sporting event, or movie," all legitimate activities that should be protected by fair use, EFF argues.

The government has asked for the case to be dismissed, and the matter is awaiting a judge's decision. Pictured above is EFF client Andrew "bunnie" Huang, who wants to market a product for editing HD television signals, but is hampered by copyright limitations he believes are unconstitutional. Record label EMI sued MP3tunes, an early music locker service, in 2007, along with its founder Michael Robertson, pictured above in a 2006 photo.

The litigation caused MP3tunes to go bankrupt in 2012, but Robertson kept fighting his battle in court.
In October 2016, the 2nd Circuit appeals court upheld and even expanded EMI's court win—a disastrous result for Robertson and MP3tunes.

Today, cloud music services are thriving.

But the MP3tunes precedent shows that innovators who cross the music industry still must risk paying a heavy price. In an opinion published December 6, the US Supreme Court stopped Apple from collecting $399 million in patent infringement damages from Samsung over iPhone-related design patents.

The high court held that the lower court erred when it allowed Apple to automatically collect "lost profits" damages based on the entire value of a phone.
It was the first time in more than a century that the Supreme Court took a case involving design patents. Pictured above is one of the infringed patents, D618,677, describing a black rectangle with rounded corners. The lawyers behind Prenda Law were denounced in 2013 by a federal judge who called them a "porno-trolling collective" that had abused federal courts.
In December 2016, two of those lawyers, John Steele and Paul Hansmeier, were arrested and charged with fraud and perjury. Pictured above is John Steele's banner advertisement from his old firm, which practiced family law. Two band members of 60's rock band The Turtles, pictured above, have turned the once-obscure issue of pre-1972 songs into a hot copyright issue.

The Turtles sued Sirius XM and Pandora, demanding royalties for their old sound recordings, which are not protected by federal law.
Sirius and Pandora lost key legal battles in 2015, and Sirius paid out a $210 million settlement to record labels.

But the Turtles case went on, and on Dec. 21, 2016 the New York Court of Appeals handed a big victory to Sirius, saying that the state's common law offered no copyright protection for pre-1972 recordings.

The decision may be influential in other states. Nokia and Apple fought each other over smartphone patents between 2009 and 2011, but settled their case. Nokia has backed out out of the smartphone business, but is still licensing its patents, so the two companies are back at war. Nokia has sued Apple over patents in 11 different countries. Meanwhile, Apple has filed an antitrust lawsuit against Nokia, accusing the Finnish firm of working together with "patent-assertion entities"—a.k.a. patent trolls—to "maximize the royalties that can be extracted from product companies."

Smartphone patent wars redux: Nokia sues Apple, big time

Photo by Tim Duckettreader comments 63 Share this story Nokia and Alcatel-Lucent have launched a major legal attack on Apple, filing lawsuits in Germany and the US that accuse Apple of infringing 32 patents. According to Nokia's statement, the patents cover technologies that include display, user interface, software, antenna, chipsets, and video coding.

The US lawsuit includes 10 patents and was filed in federal court in East Texas, a venue that's long been favored by patent owners. Most of the patents originated at Nokia, but at least one originated at Lucent Technologies. Nokia agreed to buy Alcatel Lucent in 2015 and completed the deal last year. The new lawsuit (PDF) appears to be a major revival of the patent battles Apple and Nokia fought between 2009 and 2011.

Back then, the two companies were also engaged in litigation that spanned the globe.

All that was put to rest with a settlement in 2011, which analysts estimated at the time may have been worth hundreds of millions of euros to Nokia.

Despite those payments, Nokia said in a statement today that Apple refused to license "other of its patented inventions which are used by many of Apple's products." Of course, that might be because Nokia didn't offer them as part of the 2011 settlement package.
Some Nokia patents were distributed to so-called "patent trolls," also called patent assertion companies or PAEs.

Those PAEs include Acacia Research Corp., a branch of which won a $22.1 million verdict against Apple in June. "Nokia has created or contributed to many of the fundamental technologies used in today's mobile devices, including Apple products," said Nokia patent chief Ilkka Rahnastoin a statement. "After several years of negotiations trying to reach agreement to cover Apple's use of these patents, we are now taking action to defend our rights. The Nokia lawsuit accuses every version of iPhone—from the iPhone 7 all the way back to the iPhone 3GS—of infringing Nokia patents.

Also accused are iPad Pro and every version of iPad Air and iPad Mini, as well as the Apple Watch, Apple TV, and services like Find My iPhone and Find my iPad. As one example, Nokia says that US Patent No. 6,701,294, which it acquired from Alcatel-Lucent, is infringed by Apple's Siri feature in iOS 10. "Apple's Siri acts as an intelligent personal assistant in conjunction with the user interface... of Apple mobile devices," the complaint states.

The Siri-using products have a "translator unit," an "evaluator unit" and an "interrogator unit for querying said one or more prescribed databases," and a "supplier unit" to give information to the user.
In Nokia's view, the Apple "supplier unit" consists of "the Siri program, including the Apple device, wireless connections, and backend servers." Nokia's business has gone through dramatic ups and downs since its earlier dispute with Apple. Nokia sold its phone business to Microsoft in 2014.

But Microsoft struggled and ultimately exited the smartphone sector anyway earlier this year, taking a final write-down on the $7.1 billion Nokia purchase and laying off up to 1,850 workers. Earlier this month, Nokia announced plans to get back into the smartphone business with Android-powered phones that will be on the market next year. Just yesterday, Apple filed an antitrust lawsuit (PDF) against Nokia in federal court in San Jose.
In it, Apple accused the Finnish company of transferring "massive numbers of patents" to patent assertion companies like Acacia. Nokia reached a deal with "each of its PAE co-conspirators" to separately enforce a diffused patent portfolio, "to maximize the aggregate royalties that can be extracted from product companies," Apple lawyers allege. "Nokia and those PAEs have thereby increased market power and created or enhanced monopoly power associated with those patents." Apple claims that Nokia's strategy of working with PAEs to stack up big royalty payments is a violation of US antitrust laws, as well as a breach of contract.

The breach of contract claim says that Nokia violated its commitments to license certain standard-essential patents on a FRAND (fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory) basis.