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RHSA-2017:0021-1: Moderate: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free security update

An update for gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free is now available for Red HatEnterprise Linux 7.Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact ofModerate.

A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives adetailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability from the CVElink(s) in the References section. GStreamer is a streaming media framework based on graphs of filters whichoperate on media data.

The gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free package contains acollection of plug-ins for GStreamer.Security Fix(es):* An integer overflow flaw, leading to a heap-based buffer overflow, was foundin GStreamer's VMware VMnc video file format decoding plug-in.

A remote attackercould use this flaw to cause an application using GStreamer to crash or,potentially, execute arbitrary code with the privileges of the user running theapplication. (CVE-2016-9445)* Multiple flaws were discovered in GStreamer's H.264 and MPEG-TS plug-ins.

Aremote attacker could use these flaws to cause an application using GStreamer tocrash. (CVE-2016-9809, CVE-2016-9812, CVE-2016-9813) Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 7) SRPMS: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: f1b972e24d2f83fd00c12822762699bbSHA-256: 669aba86bc3d4c4c83de25943b744dcb41f0177dc39df3c86c42fa6ef684dbbd   x86_64: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: e782a667ebd7f35fb60869baec47f7c1SHA-256: e7b92af47a3b2dd40768fbabcc03b3c4b204e03149374353e14a6a78893801ad gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02d0dcd8176440cf10640bc78481b1a2SHA-256: eaf7c7c7496bd8b3c81fc6be1e13532b3bc8a84dde99b5b791bdfc4e4290feb0 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 6f6f3e66fb3d78dcd87d9806ef51a2d2SHA-256: 1b367db491279cbfe51c38510345a81fe43b87972b7718181708d0c1b3ac8d12 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a7aafcdabe0b3a795f804a3fa6235ce3SHA-256: badb1e0b6d218fe587cfc1b56f2b157b2408b5f4ffe4e8d683df6ecc1350e2da gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: a438a6b2b63503ebab7d838d992567aaSHA-256: 661cc4a4d9bb10ea2ab239301f33fc00e4b0219ce6a15780a053c64ac469c191 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 1ca7168a7b88718a89e3b8be770c15e4SHA-256: fd0ea8e920f7c3c83e1fa533b9ca73a75842e635e2232392d362c1f91d675a9c   Red Hat Enterprise Linux HPC Node (v. 7) SRPMS: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: f1b972e24d2f83fd00c12822762699bbSHA-256: 669aba86bc3d4c4c83de25943b744dcb41f0177dc39df3c86c42fa6ef684dbbd   x86_64: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: e782a667ebd7f35fb60869baec47f7c1SHA-256: e7b92af47a3b2dd40768fbabcc03b3c4b204e03149374353e14a6a78893801ad gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02d0dcd8176440cf10640bc78481b1a2SHA-256: eaf7c7c7496bd8b3c81fc6be1e13532b3bc8a84dde99b5b791bdfc4e4290feb0 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 6f6f3e66fb3d78dcd87d9806ef51a2d2SHA-256: 1b367db491279cbfe51c38510345a81fe43b87972b7718181708d0c1b3ac8d12 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a7aafcdabe0b3a795f804a3fa6235ce3SHA-256: badb1e0b6d218fe587cfc1b56f2b157b2408b5f4ffe4e8d683df6ecc1350e2da gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: a438a6b2b63503ebab7d838d992567aaSHA-256: 661cc4a4d9bb10ea2ab239301f33fc00e4b0219ce6a15780a053c64ac469c191 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 1ca7168a7b88718a89e3b8be770c15e4SHA-256: fd0ea8e920f7c3c83e1fa533b9ca73a75842e635e2232392d362c1f91d675a9c   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (v. 7) SRPMS: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: f1b972e24d2f83fd00c12822762699bbSHA-256: 669aba86bc3d4c4c83de25943b744dcb41f0177dc39df3c86c42fa6ef684dbbd   PPC: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.ppc.rpm     MD5: e3bca4a0e1cc38fc8f580daf7165e7f9SHA-256: 931bcdf7b4c0157708b1fa50d08c6326d5344a9759d13b38fbe2d9351950a695 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 0f4e168aff3ee3c332bbb56b0ea774d8SHA-256: c09c600e6ef411d7bf0874bb2ec4208d491f689310d15ae9994df22e57439bc2 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.ppc.rpm     MD5: ad19ac9152072d491661878fb1320d3bSHA-256: fd7792162018dbaaf67efff86b3d128465bf0cf75063aa3c08257e844b5c1a06 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 147963cb10716f990af18351ec87c737SHA-256: f3e34884e05a5df19b6f89b04c52fa7f74f4e1a6d33f04a3917ba1ef35b9c295 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.ppc.rpm     MD5: c681987521915f2f2584b949cd247f3aSHA-256: 64e82e91f7c18920a5d0735a34401b2f548dbc4a4910db98c373e25697d09271 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: fe5d369309b38bae84d4ea7f507ad526SHA-256: 75bbf1c8f62d6ae79afb782c736798623f4a6d42ad8117eb5b31e8ac89b5f7a4   PPC64LE: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 6352ccfb9398b50dad20176a5da2d063SHA-256: 30fb1fe89c0ed3861eb68c057d8402587338536f6adecc71920f64df80051075 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: b72d70b20621a5be1323caf63d05ca9aSHA-256: 6e8e282fe07740d63022ca12ee5ef65e3d2fa591f2b2d5e817b550c5869c0e3a gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 539a90acc3ffc72c6e17a691aa42d39bSHA-256: 3866bc99ad3fb565daea711bd5fe4380a97265d3a6c08c4d0077fef14667793c   s390x: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.s390.rpm     MD5: 0472dfaa3d89d97ba30713c274e5f049SHA-256: 2f33d4f0cc81b96d1d68d0bc9680581f34475a8ebe298937645aaeb442c4efbd gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: ab4ce6ff92f2017a13e94457157d75e1SHA-256: b6b61d685981eb05ab60b6f03b4065c6154828ae77b94f5e23c69e140ed5b00e gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.s390.rpm     MD5: 90cf3926958e176e8c58c38aae669754SHA-256: 11284709ba3696e876f109e2e4ac8dd7296ce159c456a10307be790afefe3ffe gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: fec16d5329097f9977432be2b5f41ecdSHA-256: 32c61ccf5a908135fa5590b9026e0ce3f986b88838c474a5e720c317971c4e4b gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.s390.rpm     MD5: 61a3f98a9b329ff1472869d625d3a251SHA-256: 5f7b1402819517961604d8e134f2d85e5bef5e31daa54687650d740559693032 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 790374d0579c594431125f4605bd6550SHA-256: 9e87e4a781c7d16e64a8ec922559b3cb48f905fd392259611fac5ce7a591eb6d   x86_64: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: e782a667ebd7f35fb60869baec47f7c1SHA-256: e7b92af47a3b2dd40768fbabcc03b3c4b204e03149374353e14a6a78893801ad gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02d0dcd8176440cf10640bc78481b1a2SHA-256: eaf7c7c7496bd8b3c81fc6be1e13532b3bc8a84dde99b5b791bdfc4e4290feb0 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 6f6f3e66fb3d78dcd87d9806ef51a2d2SHA-256: 1b367db491279cbfe51c38510345a81fe43b87972b7718181708d0c1b3ac8d12 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a7aafcdabe0b3a795f804a3fa6235ce3SHA-256: badb1e0b6d218fe587cfc1b56f2b157b2408b5f4ffe4e8d683df6ecc1350e2da gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: a438a6b2b63503ebab7d838d992567aaSHA-256: 661cc4a4d9bb10ea2ab239301f33fc00e4b0219ce6a15780a053c64ac469c191 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 1ca7168a7b88718a89e3b8be770c15e4SHA-256: fd0ea8e920f7c3c83e1fa533b9ca73a75842e635e2232392d362c1f91d675a9c   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server TUS (v. 7.3) SRPMS: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: f1b972e24d2f83fd00c12822762699bbSHA-256: 669aba86bc3d4c4c83de25943b744dcb41f0177dc39df3c86c42fa6ef684dbbd   x86_64: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: e782a667ebd7f35fb60869baec47f7c1SHA-256: e7b92af47a3b2dd40768fbabcc03b3c4b204e03149374353e14a6a78893801ad gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02d0dcd8176440cf10640bc78481b1a2SHA-256: eaf7c7c7496bd8b3c81fc6be1e13532b3bc8a84dde99b5b791bdfc4e4290feb0 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 6f6f3e66fb3d78dcd87d9806ef51a2d2SHA-256: 1b367db491279cbfe51c38510345a81fe43b87972b7718181708d0c1b3ac8d12 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a7aafcdabe0b3a795f804a3fa6235ce3SHA-256: badb1e0b6d218fe587cfc1b56f2b157b2408b5f4ffe4e8d683df6ecc1350e2da gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: a438a6b2b63503ebab7d838d992567aaSHA-256: 661cc4a4d9bb10ea2ab239301f33fc00e4b0219ce6a15780a053c64ac469c191 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 1ca7168a7b88718a89e3b8be770c15e4SHA-256: fd0ea8e920f7c3c83e1fa533b9ca73a75842e635e2232392d362c1f91d675a9c   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation (v. 7) SRPMS: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: f1b972e24d2f83fd00c12822762699bbSHA-256: 669aba86bc3d4c4c83de25943b744dcb41f0177dc39df3c86c42fa6ef684dbbd   x86_64: gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: e782a667ebd7f35fb60869baec47f7c1SHA-256: e7b92af47a3b2dd40768fbabcc03b3c4b204e03149374353e14a6a78893801ad gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02d0dcd8176440cf10640bc78481b1a2SHA-256: eaf7c7c7496bd8b3c81fc6be1e13532b3bc8a84dde99b5b791bdfc4e4290feb0 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 6f6f3e66fb3d78dcd87d9806ef51a2d2SHA-256: 1b367db491279cbfe51c38510345a81fe43b87972b7718181708d0c1b3ac8d12 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a7aafcdabe0b3a795f804a3fa6235ce3SHA-256: badb1e0b6d218fe587cfc1b56f2b157b2408b5f4ffe4e8d683df6ecc1350e2da gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: a438a6b2b63503ebab7d838d992567aaSHA-256: 661cc4a4d9bb10ea2ab239301f33fc00e4b0219ce6a15780a053c64ac469c191 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free-devel-1.4.5-6.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 1ca7168a7b88718a89e3b8be770c15e4SHA-256: fd0ea8e920f7c3c83e1fa533b9ca73a75842e635e2232392d362c1f91d675a9c   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) 1395767 - CVE-2016-9445 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free: Integer overflow when allocating render buffer in VMnc decoder1401880 - CVE-2016-9809 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free: Off-by-one read in gst_h264_parse_set_caps1401930 - CVE-2016-9812 gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free: Out-of-bounds read in gst_mpegts_section_new1401934 - CVE-2016-9813 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free: NULL pointer dereference in mpegts parser These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:

RHSA-2017:0018-1: Moderate: gstreamer-plugins-bad-free security update

An update for gstreamer-plugins-bad-free is now available for Red Hat EnterpriseLinux 7.Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact ofModerate.

A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives adetailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability from the CVElink(s) in the References section. GStreamer is a streaming media framework based on graphs of filters whichoperate on media data.

The gstreamer-plugins-bad-free package contains acollection of plug-ins for GStreamer.Security Fix(es):* An integer overflow flaw, leading to a heap-based buffer overflow, was foundin GStreamer's VMware VMnc video file format decoding plug-in.

A remote attackercould use this flaw to cause an application using GStreamer to crash or,potentially, execute arbitrary code with the privileges of the user running theapplication. (CVE-2016-9445)* A memory corruption flaw was found in GStreamer's Nintendo NSF music fileformat decoding plug-in.

A remote attacker could use this flaw to cause anapplication using GStreamer to crash or, potentially, execute arbitrary codewith the privileges of the user running the application. (CVE-2016-9447)* An out-of-bounds heap read flaw was found in GStreamer's H.264 parser.

Aremote attacker could use this flaw to cause an application using GStreamer tocrash. (CVE-2016-9809)Note: This update removes the vulnerable Nintendo NSF plug-in. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 7) SRPMS: gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-0.10.23-22.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: 9a5b8ee38f24bb1b9e0de19cd2e08272SHA-256: 794ae2c67fd851b276b6bba317409ad32fd0b6850fe52891e121e3e2179f952e   x86_64: gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-0.10.23-22.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 56f0a13dcd7dbf408b9422eaa491cd99SHA-256: f4dfdf55616ac87cb4b952eb501f86dcfce3af3e5e1cd907bb20a167d4a65b01 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-0.10.23-22.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: ec02d38db9f0ebdbb23d59f2d8f8ec9dSHA-256: 7dd3f0b5da6b8dd46cc5d8ed4b2232ebe2dec977fb0d44d44e9af7e2415b54a6 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-0.10.23-22.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: d6f2c3f200d47a961f9aeb2eb528cb7cSHA-256: 44bc59506fe291c3bd5a232a9c5fd5fd051595b827a99076982e928579427230 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-0.10.23-22.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 6fe6b83af1ea79da26697b0bb4b97081SHA-256: 987b5e942222d7a025d50996344fe4085a4b6ada13f8277ed2e17f42fa47d01b gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-devel-0.10.23-22.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: be1f14b8e99cff73ac95b26f96a48113SHA-256: 0491af411802d3685c244e88bbaff5ed20c249dfe7c9449c2778b225f5f59f18 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-devel-0.10.23-22.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 067ea323d3cfb0a549d419639e874f1cSHA-256: 1e02a5469c60478f70cb89b5dc4e065a6e85dd90e51afeb523a5df02c623dd42 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-devel-docs-0.10.23-22.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 34139699f2ea15f8bf3b5d83df4abad4SHA-256: 0bb8528281d1756e208434e2d2404a77c14392a484c3ba4ac29fc9da4abf8902   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (v. 7) SRPMS: gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-0.10.23-22.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: 9a5b8ee38f24bb1b9e0de19cd2e08272SHA-256: 794ae2c67fd851b276b6bba317409ad32fd0b6850fe52891e121e3e2179f952e   PPC: gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-0.10.23-22.el7_3.ppc.rpm     MD5: b8539acab6ceea7ec70e4365708f5495SHA-256: 3f381846605a129d14e5a9599041136b8abdd206dd02985fae61595201e75708 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-0.10.23-22.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: ceb6438719a4b3d49b1a11a997f36475SHA-256: 7340d0e37f4fff5b8eea168088c02b851bc094e26724f9d5ff00a6d2104a9220 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-0.10.23-22.el7_3.ppc.rpm     MD5: 073a6487e0cfbdf0a8e441b016d086f5SHA-256: 1954bb26dcce7e285c74e6fa027aff8d3e2272fc4f268951ce1e153adc1e57d7 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-0.10.23-22.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 497045fed0f611a94dd0fb8f154df0acSHA-256: 04038489779aa09f74b7b652ae777f5e29fce2f05351c632732c15193dc1a084 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-devel-0.10.23-22.el7_3.ppc.rpm     MD5: f8e71d092e4f519bdd2263fcf2b6e250SHA-256: 86329951e918d2b6dce830da16ed9dc3def7a1d9794926f8ee941492a4128d17 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-devel-0.10.23-22.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 7e9387d3d38810ecdbfbff789d6164f3SHA-256: 2fb8693b28df66f23f28f3fda6335b1e2284a834730e30d61695fd3a1bcc19d9 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-devel-docs-0.10.23-22.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: f6341bd9ceb7ec6db07534e7217e04b4SHA-256: f842afe0f0456e203d5953552be67655f090b5a9ccd4dbbe99d2b6f8702a7e12   PPC64LE: 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    MD5: 56f0a13dcd7dbf408b9422eaa491cd99SHA-256: f4dfdf55616ac87cb4b952eb501f86dcfce3af3e5e1cd907bb20a167d4a65b01 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-0.10.23-22.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: ec02d38db9f0ebdbb23d59f2d8f8ec9dSHA-256: 7dd3f0b5da6b8dd46cc5d8ed4b2232ebe2dec977fb0d44d44e9af7e2415b54a6 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-0.10.23-22.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: d6f2c3f200d47a961f9aeb2eb528cb7cSHA-256: 44bc59506fe291c3bd5a232a9c5fd5fd051595b827a99076982e928579427230 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-debuginfo-0.10.23-22.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 6fe6b83af1ea79da26697b0bb4b97081SHA-256: 987b5e942222d7a025d50996344fe4085a4b6ada13f8277ed2e17f42fa47d01b gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-devel-0.10.23-22.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: be1f14b8e99cff73ac95b26f96a48113SHA-256: 0491af411802d3685c244e88bbaff5ed20c249dfe7c9449c2778b225f5f59f18 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-devel-0.10.23-22.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 067ea323d3cfb0a549d419639e874f1cSHA-256: 1e02a5469c60478f70cb89b5dc4e065a6e85dd90e51afeb523a5df02c623dd42 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free-devel-docs-0.10.23-22.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 34139699f2ea15f8bf3b5d83df4abad4SHA-256: 0bb8528281d1756e208434e2d2404a77c14392a484c3ba4ac29fc9da4abf8902   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) 1395126 - CVE-2016-9447 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free: Memory corruption flaw in NSF decoder1395767 - CVE-2016-9445 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free: Integer overflow when allocating render buffer in VMnc decoder1401880 - CVE-2016-9809 gstreamer-plugins-bad-free: Off-by-one read in gst_h264_parse_set_caps These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:

Cisco Service Aims to Stop Pirate Video Streams

The networking vendor, in conjunction with Friend MTS, has developed a service that can find the sources of illegal streaming and shut them down. In the world of online video piracy, the streaming of live events is increasingly becoming among the most difficult challenges. Where once streaming was low resolution and delivered through websites that were rife with malware and advertising, they now offer a better user experience—high-definition resolution on multiple screens and multiple devices and with a broad range of options."The demand for premium content, in every language and into every market, has led to a surge in the supply of pirate services offering a high-quality user interface," Amit Wohl, video security product manager in Cisco Systems' service provider group, wrote in a post on the company blog. "The video quality offered is unprecedented, rivaling that on the Pay TV platforms themselves.

Bitrates of 4 to 6M bps for HD channels are common, with 1M bps H.264/AVC for SD channels.

Even an Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) channel being delivered in HEVC at 15M bps is on offer."Cisco wants to put a stop to illegal streaming.

The company has introduced its Streaming Piracy Prevention (SPP) service, which includes a technology that detects when there is illegal distribution of content on the internet and then closes the pirate networks.

According to Wohl, SSP is a fully automated service that uses a "forensic watermark" to identify subscriptions or sessions that are being used to get the content, and then moves to shut down the source through a video security system in real time."Gone are the days of sending a legal notice and waiting to see if anyone will answer; SPP acts without the need to involve or gain cooperation from any third parties, enabling an unmatched level of cross-device retransmission prevention and allowing service providers to take back control of their channels, to maximize their revenue," he wrote. Cisco officials pointed to figures from piracy monitoring specialist Friend MTS that showed that in the last month, it has found more than 12,000 unique instances of HD channels—1,280 x 720 frame size or higher) on pirate services that are being sourced from pay TV service providers worldwide.

Expanding the search to include SD resolution—which is the resolution most often aimed at mobile devices—that number jumps to 22,000.

The problem is hitting almost all service providers regardless of size and costing them money. "To effectively monetize live content, both the service providers that distribute content and the rights owners that license it need to ensure that it is available exclusively through licensed channels," Wohl wrote. "Wide availability through illegal services or sites diminishes the value of the content, as paying viewers opt for the cheaper or free options made available by the pirates."Rights owners are more frequently requiring licensees to deploy higher levels of platform security in order to get access to ultra-premium content. However, such measures don't always work, and they're not always possible or practical, especially on older platforms, he wrote.

Also, traditional ways of stopping streaming piracy—such as sending legal notices and targeting infrastructure providers—often are ineffective.
In some instances, there is no one to send a notice to.

Targeting the infrastructure providers is usually a time-consuming process, and pirate services often are the largest sources of revenue for many of the platform providers.With the SPP service, Cisco is partnering with Friend MTS to combine efforts.

The service uses Friend MTS' piracy monitoring technology to find real-time pirated video feeds on the internet and deliver them into the SPP service, which finds the source of the illegal stream and shuts it down, Wohl wrote. 

Brace yourselves—source code powering potent IoT DDoSes just went public

EnlargeMichael Theis reader comments 11 Share this story A hacker has released computer source code that allows relatively unsophisticated people to wage the kinds of extraordinarily large assaults that recently knocked security news site KrebsOnSecurity offline and set new records for so-called distributed denial-of-service attacks. KrebsOnSecurity's Brian Krebs reported on Saturday that the source code for "Mirai," a network of Internet-connected cameras and other "Internet of things" devices, was published on Friday.

Dale Drew, the chief security officer at Internet backbone provider Level 3 Communications, told Ars that Mirai is one of two competing IoT botnet families that have recently menaced the Internet with record-breaking distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks—including the one that targeted Krebs with 620 gigabits per second of network traffic, and another that hit French webhost OVH and reportedly peaked at more than 1 terabit per second Until now, the botnets created with the newer and technically more sophisticated Mirai have been greatly outnumbered by those based on its rival Bashlight, with about 233,000 infected devices versus 963,000 respectively.

Friday's release could allow the smaller and more disciplined Mirai, which Russian antivirus provider Dr. Web briefly profiled last week, to go mainstream.

That, in turn, could turn the mass compromise of cameras and other Internet-connected devices into a full-blown epidemic that could push record DDoSes to ever-higher volumes.
In an e-mail to Ars, Drew wrote: There is already a surge in botnet operators attempting to find and exploit IoT devices in order to gain access to uniform and sizable botnet networks.

These botnets are largely being used in [DDoS-for ransom] campaigns, which is netting the operators significant revenue and the ability to spend more time to improve their capabilities and add additional layers of sophistication. By releasing this source code, this will undoubtedly enable a surge in botnet operators to use this code to start a new surge in consumer and small business IoT compromises.

And while most of the current IoT compromises have been around a very specific telnet exploit, I predict that botnet operators–eager to command multi hundred thousand botnet nodes–will be searching for a larger inventory of IoT exploits to take advantage of.

This could be the start of a surge of attacks against IoT devices in the consumer space. Both Mirai and Bashlight exploit the same IoT vulnerabilities, mostly or almost exclusively involving weakness involving the telnet remote connection protocol in devices running a form of embedded Linux known as BusyBox.

But unlike Bashlight, the newer Mirai botnet software encrypts traffic passing between the infected devices and the command and control servers that feed them instructions.

That makes it much harder for researchers to monitor the malicious network.

There's also evidence that Mirai is able to seize control of Bashlight-infected devices and possibly even patch them so they can never be infected again by a rival botnet.

About 80,000 of the 963,000 Bashlight devices now belong to Mirai operators, Drew said. So far, Level 3 has identified IP cameras manufactured by Dahua as one of the most commonly compromised devices making up the botnets.

The company also said a line of digital video recorders using the H.264 format is also common, but the vendor is not yet known. "By all accounts it looks like the camera is still operational while it's being used by both [Bashlight and Mirai] bad guys for DDoS purposes," Drew told Ars. "It might be slower, but by all accounts it looks like it's still running." Based on more than a month of monitoring by Level 3, Drew said that Bashlight is controlled by about 200 command servers, which in turn are controlled by a dozen or so separate operators. He said Bashlight botnets are likely responsible for all or most of the junk traffic hitting KrebsOnSecurity and OVH. Most of the recent coverage from Ars and other news outlets has significantly underreported the number of infected devices because only small portions of the them—in the case of OVH, reportedly somewhere from 140,000 to 165,000—were actually deployed. He said other researchers who have doubted his estimates of 1.2 million devices making up the combined Bashlight and Mirai botnets lack the network visibility of Level 3, which as one of the world's biggest backbones, sees a more complete picture.

DDoS mitigation services, by contrast, often see only the traffic and IP addresses that are attacking their client, he said. According to Krebs, the Mirai source code was posted to the hacking community HackForums by a user with the handle Anna-senpai. Krebs said the leaker provided the following explanation: When I first go in DDoS industry, I wasn’t planning on staying in it long.
I made my money, there’s lots of eyes looking at IOT now, so it’s time to GTFO.
So today, I have an amazing release for you. With Mirai, I usually pull max 380k bots from telnet alone. However, after the Kreb [sic] DDoS, ISPs been slowly shutting down and cleaning up their act.

Today, max pull is about 300k bots, and dropping. While it's encouraging that Internet service providers are starting to contain the botnet, but the extraordinary firepower isn't likely to die overnight. With the source code now in the public domain, the technically superior Mirai botnets could easily surpass 1 million devices in the coming weeks.

That, in turn, could stoke a battle of botnets that inflicts massive collateral damage.

Kaspersky DDoS Intelligence Report for Q2 2016

Q2 events DDoS attacks on cryptocurrency wallet services have played an important role in the lives of these services.
In the second quarter of 2016, two companies – CoinWallet and Coinkite – announced they were terminating their work due to lengthy DDoS attacks.

According to Coinkite’s official blog, the e-wallet service will be shut down, as well as its API.

The company admits that the decision was largely due to constant attacks and pressure from various governments who want to regulate cryptocurrency. A piece of malware was detected that possesses worm functionality and builds a botnet of Linux-based routers (including Wi-Fi access points).
It spreads via Telnet.

An analysis of the worm’s code has shown that it can be used in various types of DDoS attacks. Experts have registered a growing number of botnet C&C servers operating based on LizardStresser – a tool used to perform DDoS attacks.

The LizardStresser source codes belong to the hacker group Lizard Squad and were made publically available at the end of 2015.

This is what led to the increase in the number of botnets using new versions of the tool. Researchers discovered a botnet consisting of 25 000 devices most of which are surveillance cameras.

According to the experts, 46% of the infected devices are CCTV systems H.264 DVR.

The other compromised devices were manufactured by ProvisionISR, Qsee, QuesTek, TechnoMate, LCT CCTV, Capture CCTV, Elvox, Novus, and MagTec CCTV. A new botnet named Jaku located mainly in Japan and South Korea was detected. Researchers have stated that the botnet operators are focused on major targets: engineering companies, international organizations, scientific institutions. A new modification of Cerber ransomware that uses an infected device to carry out DDoS attacks was discovered.

This cryptor Trojan is responsible for sending the UDP packets in which it changes the sender address for the address of the victim.

A host that receives the packet sends a reply to the victim’s address.

This technique is used to organize a UDP flood, meaning that this Trojan, in addition to its basic ransomware functionality, also integrates the functionality of a DDoS bot. Statistics for botnet-assisted DDoS attacks Methodology Kaspersky Lab has extensive experience in combating cyber threats, including DDoS attacks of various types and levels of complexity.

The company’s experts monitor botnet activity with the help of the DDoS Intelligence system. Resources in 70 countries were targeted by DDoS attacks in Q2 2016 #KLReport Tweet The DDoS Intelligence system (part of Kaspersky DDoS Protection) is designed to intercept and analyze commands sent to bots from command and control (C&C) servers, and does not have to wait until user devices are infected or cybercriminal commands are executed in order to gather data. This report contains the DDoS Intelligence statistics for the second quarter of 2016. In the context of this report, a single (separate) DDoS attack is defined as an incident during which any break in botnet activity lasts less than 24 hours.
If the same web resource was attacked by the same botnet after a break of more than 24 hours, this is regarded as a separate DDoS attack.

Attacks on the same web resource from two different botnets are also regarded as separate attacks. The geographic distribution of DDoS victims and C&C servers is determined according to their IP addresses.
In this report, the number of DDoS targets is calculated based on the number of unique IP addresses reported in the quarterly statistics. 77.4% of targeted resources in Q2 2016 were located in China #KLReport Tweet It is important to note that DDoS Intelligence statistics are limited to those botnets detected and analyzed by Kaspersky Lab.
It should also be noted that botnets are just one of the tools used to carry out DDoS attacks; therefore, the data presented in this report does not cover every DDoS attack that has occurred within the specified time period. Q2 Summary Resources in 70 countries were targeted by DDoS attacks in Q2 2016. 77.4% of targeted resources were located in China. China, South Korea and the US remained leaders in terms of the number of DDoS attacks and number of targets. The longest DDoS attack in Q2 2016 lasted for 291 hours (or 12.1 days) – significantly longer than the previous quarter’s maximum (8.2 days). SYN DDoS, TCP DDoS and HTTP DDoS remain the most common DDoS attack scenarios.

The proportion of attacks using the SYN DDoS method increased 1.4 times compared to the previous quarter. In Q2 2016, 70.2% of all detected attacks were launched from Linux botnets, which is almost double the figure for the first quarter. Geography of attacks In Q2 2016, the geography of DDoS attacks narrowed to 70 countries, with China accounting for 77.4% of attacks.
In fact, 97.3% of the targeted resources were located in just 10 countries.

The three most targeted countries remained unchanged – China, South Korea and the US. Distribution of DDoS attacks by country, Q1 2016 vs. Q2 2016 This quarter’s statistics show that 94.3% of attacks had unique targets within the 10 most targeted countries. Distribution of unique DDoS attack targets by country, Q1 2016 vs. Q2 2016 Here too China was the leader: 71.3% of all DDoS attacks targeted unique resources located in the country (vs. 49.7% in Q1). In Q2 2016 China, South Korea and the US remained leaders in terms of the number of DDoS attacks #KLReport Tweet The growth in the proportion of attacks on Chinese resources resulted in a decline in the share of attacks on resources in the other TOP 10 countries: South Korea saw its share fall by 15.5 percentage points, while the contribution of the US fell by 0.7 p.p. Russia left the TOP 5 after its share decreased by 1.3 p.p.
Vietnam took Russia’s place after its share remained unchanged (1.1%).

Germany and Canada both left the TOP 10 and were replaced by France and the Netherlands on 0.9% and 0.5% respectively. Changes in DDoS attack numbers DDoS activity was relatively uneven in Q2 2016, with a lull from late April till the end of May and two sharp peaks on 29 May and 2 June.

The peak number of attacks in one day was 1,676, recorded on 6 June. Number of DDoS attacks over time* in Q2 2016 *DDoS attacks may last for several days.
In this timeline, the same attack can be counted several times, i.e. one time for each day of its duration.
The longest DDoS attack in Q2 2016 lasted for 291 hours (or 12.1 days) #KLReport Tweet An analysis of the data for the first half of 2016 shows that although the distribution of DDoS attack numbers by day of the week remains uneven, a steady upward trend is evident. Number of DDoS attacks, Q1 2016 – Q2 2016 In Q2, Tuesday was the most active day of the week for DDoS attacks (15.2% of attacks), followed by Monday (15.0%).

Thursday, which came second in Q1, fell one place (-1.4 p.p.).
Sunday became the quietest day of the week in terms of DDoS attacks (13.0%). Distribution of DDoS attack numbers by day of the week Types and duration of DDoS attacks The ranking of the most popular attack methods remained unchanged from the previous quarter.

The SYN DDoS method has further strengthened its position as leader: its share increased from 54.9% to 76%.

The proportion of the other types of attacks decreased slightly except for UDP DDoS whose contribution grew by 0.7 p.p. However, those little fluctuations did not affect the order of the Top 5. Distribution of DDoS attacks by type The growth in the popularity of SYN-DDoS is largely down to the fact that during the second quarter of 2016, 70.2% of all detected attacks came from Linux botnets.

This was the first time in a number of quarters that there has been such an imbalance between the activity of Linux- and Windows-based DDoS bots. Previously, the difference had not exceeded 10 percentage points. Namely Linux bots are the most appropriate tool for using SYN-DDoS. Correlation between attacks launched from Windows and Linux botnets Attacks that last no more than four hours remained the most popular, although their share decreased from 67.8% in Q1 to 59.8% in Q2 of 2016.

At the same time, the proportion of longer attacks increased considerably – attacks that lasted 20-49 hours accounted for 8.6% (vs. 3.9% in the first quarter) and those that lasted 50-99 hours accounted for 4% (vs. 0.8% in the previous quarter). SYN DDoS, TCP DDoS and HTTP DDoS remain the most common DDoS attack scenarios in Q2 2016 #KLReport Tweet The longest DDoS attack in the second quarter of 2016 lasted for 291 hours, which significantly exceeded the Q1 maximum of 197 hours. Distribution of DDoS attacks by duration (hours) C&C servers and botnet types In Q2, South Korea remained the clear leader in terms of the number of C&C servers located on its territory, with its share amounting to 69.6%, a 2 p.p. increase from the first quarter of 2016.

The TOP 3 countries hosting the most C&C servers (84.8%) remained unchanged, while Brazil (2.3%), Italy (1%) and Israel (1%) all entered the TOP 10. Distribution of botnet C&C servers by country in Q2 2016 As in previous quarters, 99.5% of DDoS targets in Q2 2016 were attacked by bots belonging to one family.

Cybercriminals launched attacks using bots from two different families (used by one or more botnet masters) in just 0.5% of cases.

The most popular families of the quarter were Xor, Yoyo and Nitol. Conclusion The second quarter of 2016 saw cybercriminals paying close attention to financial institutions working with cryptocurrency.
Several of these organizations cited DDoS attacks as the reason for ceasing their activities.
Intense competition leads to the use of unfair methods, one of which is the use of DDoS attacks.

A strong interest on the part of the attackers is due to a particular feature of the businesses involved in processing cryptocurrency – not everyone is happy about the lack of regulation when it comes to cryptocurrency turnover. In Q2 2016, 70.2% of all detected attacks were launched from Linux botnets #KLReport Tweet Another trend is the use of vulnerable IoT devices in botnets to launch DDoS attacks.
In one of our earlier reports, we wrote about the emergence of a botnet consisting of CCTV cameras; the second quarter of 2016 saw a certain amount of interest in these devices among botnet organizers.
It is possible that by the end of this year the world will have heard about some even more “exotic” botnets, including vulnerable IoT devices.