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Communic and Broadcast Indonesia wrap up successful second editionJAKARTA, Indonesia: Indonesia’s Minister of Communication and Technology has hailed the second edition of Communic Indonesia and Broadcast Indonesia as an important event towards d...
Naruto can beat his chest: Monkey’s habitat wins 25% stake in the selfies.
JAKARTA, Indonesia: Innovative new companies from South East Asiarsquo;s thriving startup scene will be given a chance to showcase their latest disruptive technologies after Communic Indonesia announced the launch of a dedicated Startup Hotspot at this yearrsquo;s event.The announcement comes following the launch of the Indonesian Ministry of Communications and Informaticsrsquo; 1,000 Startup Movement, which aims to create 1,000 high-quality digital startups in the country by 2020.

The new hub at the event will present... Source: RealWire
Every conceivable joke has been made of this Planet of the Apes-styled litigation.
Analysis: PETArsquo;s quest for animals to own property is no laughing matter.
“Monkey see, monkey sue is not good law.”
London, 20 June, 2017 – Logicalis, an international IT solutions and managed services provider, together with Metrodata, a dominant ICT company in Indonesia, today announced it has agreed to acquire Packet Systems Indonesia (PSI), a leading ICT systems integrator and services company. PSI is a Cisco Gold Partner specialising in data centre, collaboration, Service Provider & Enterprise Network, and information security solutions. PSI will be integrated with the existing Indonesian operation, Logicalis Metrodata Indonesia (LMI),... Source: RealWire
This research started when we discovered an infected Pokeacute;mon GO guide in Google Play. We detected the malware as Trojan.AndroidOS.Ztorg.ad.

After some searching, I found some other similar infected apps that were being distributed from the Google Play Store.

After I started tracking these infected apps, two things struck me – how rapidly they became popular and the comments in the user review sections.
Earlier today, our products detected and successfully blocked a large number of ransomware attacks around the world.
In these attacks, data is encrypted with the extension “.WCRYrdquo; added to the filenames. Our analysis indicates the attack, dubbed “WannaCryrdquo;, is initiated through an SMBv2 remote code execution in Microsoft Windows.
So says Imperva after trolling the dark web Prefab phishing campaigns cost less to run and are twice as profitable as traditional phishing attacks, according to a new study by security vendor Imperva. Cybercriminals are lowering the cost and increasing the effectiveness of email phishing by buying complete packages of compromised servers and all the other components necessary to run a campaign of phishing attacks.

These so-called phishing-as-a-service bundles are cheaper than trying to cobble together it an email campaign from scratch.

That probably seems obvious to you, but it's useful to see some research confirming it. For one thing, the tactic is driving an across-the-board increase in phishing attacks. Phishing is the starting point for most network and data breaches.
Imperva researchers began their study by going through listings on dark-web marketplaces.

This allowed them to estimate the cost of phishing campaigns and gave them a clearer picture of the business model behind these all-too-commonplace scams. Based on the costs of the studied campaign – which used phishing pages, a spam server, an email list of 100,000 email addresses and access to compromised servers – the overall estimated expenses of an unmanaged phishing scam is about $27.65, Imperva estimates. In addition, they saw that hackers were easily able to hijack compromised webservers for their campaign, which further lowered up-front costs. Based on the researchers’ analysis of costs, PhaaS is about a quarter of the cost and two times more profitable than a traditional unmanaged phishing campaign, which tends to be more labour intensive. Lowering the costs and technology barriers associated with phishing will almost certainly lead to an increase in phishing campaigns, and the number of people falling victim to these cybercrime operations. The ease of purchase and low cost of PhaaS campaigns is highly likely to make frauds that rely on tricking marks into handing over login credentials for sensitive websites even more commonplace, Imperva concludes. “The combination of PhaaS and compromised web servers has significantly lowered the monetary, technological and time investment needed to conduct a successful phishing campaign,” said Amichai Shulman, cofounder and CTO of Imperva. “It’s no longer feasible for enterprises to use the client-side approach of endpoint software to fight phishing attempts, because people continue to click nefarious links in email. One way to slow the attacks is to choke off easy access to compromised servers, which would make the phishing business model more expensive and lower profitability.” Imperva researchers deconstructed a phishing campaign initiated in mid-June, 2016.

The researchers found that people are most likely to take the email phishing bait while at work, rather than at home.

Around a third (35 per cent) of successful phishing attacks were activated between 0900 and noon while victims were at work, busy writing and replying to emails.

The researchers also found that victims were more likely to enter their username and password to open an email attachment – in this case an Adobe PDF file – than to click on a URL in the email before filling in a web form with their login credentials. Imperva researchers were able to link the campaign to an Indonesian hacking group that began its “career” with a series of web defacement attacks against targets in the US, Australia and Indonesia.
In late 2015, the group graduated to money-making hack attacks against online shops that use the Magento e‑commerce system. Two-thirds (68 per cent) of the victim credentials harvested by the group did not exist in previously known public breaches (one-third had been breached in the past). Imperva’s latest Hacker Intelligence Initiative report, Phishing made easy: Time to rethink your prevention strategy?, can be found here [PDF].

An Infographic summarising the main findings of the study is here [PDF]. ® Sponsored: Want to know more about PAM? Visit The Register's hub
Traffic-stopping hack could mean six years inside under Indonesian 'Immoral act' law Indonesian police have arrested an “IT expert” in South Jakarta after he reconfigured a giant LED video screen to show porn. The mine's-bigger-than-yours grumble-flick was shown in Wijaya last week, according to The Jakarta Post. The man, identified only as “SAR”, was arrested at the offices of an unnamed company in the South Jakarta suburb of Senopati, police chief inspector-general Mochamad Iriawan told the Post. It seems that a security bungle by the screen's operators gave him access: he told the police that he'd managed to take a photograph of the system's username and password, and used that to log in and then went about his business. The police wouldn't confirm that to the Post, because they've so far been unable to find the photograph on his phone. Indonesia's Tribune News (here, but it's got the kind of site script that hangs browsers) says SAR was traced via his IP address.

Both the Post and the Tribune call him an “IT expert”, but someone who makes himself so easy to catch sounds more like “a mug” to Vulture South. The charges aren't trivial: “SAR” will be accused of “immoral acts” under Indonesia's criminal code, and of breaches of the Electronic Information and Transactions Law, and faces a maximum six years in the slammer and a billion-rupiah fine (about US$75,000). News outlet Berita Malam captured the naughtiness at 1:05 in the video below. Youtube Video Well: as a display of public porn it far outbids a mere refrigerator. ®
Android users can now download the unlimited virtual private network. Security-conscious Android users can now tap into Opera's free and unlimited VPN service, which blocks ad-tracking cookies and tests wireless network security, among other things. Users can change their virtual location by connecting to one of five regions—the US, Canada, Germany, Singapore, or the Netherlands—and borrowing an IP address from that area. This week's launch comes just a few months after Opera rolled out the same service to iOS, where it has been downloaded by more than 1 million users.
It was added to Opera's browser earlier this year, and all three versions were built by SurfEasy, the VPN company Opera acquired last year.
"The Opera VPN app for Android sets itself apart from other VPNs by offering a completely free service—without a data limit, no log-in required, advanced Wi-Fi protection features, and no need for a subscription," SurfEasy President Chris Houston said in a statement. The VPN service creates a secure tunnel between the user and SurfEasy's servers, making it more difficult for sites to track Web surfing.

The ad-blocking feature, meanwhile, promises to save time, frustration, and battery life. Users should, however, be aware that the app does collect anonymous data about how folks use their mobile device, which Opera makes available to third parties. "We've incorporated a Viking in the app, because Vikings didn't care about borders, and they certainly wouldn't be afraid of public Wi-Fi," Houston said. "The Opera VPN app can unlock online borders and is the closest thing to a Viking shield that today's mobile users have for virtual self-protection." Available to download from the Google Play store, the Android-based service supports English, Arabic, French, German, Indonesian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Polish, and Spanish languages.