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AppleCare+ may be the best protection option for the new smartphone.
The powerful 20000mAh PowerCore 20100 from Anker weighs just 12.5 oz, but fully charges most phones and tablets to 100% several times over without needing to be recharged.
It charges the iPhone 6s seven times, the Galaxy S6 five times or the iPad mini 4 twice.
Industry leading output of 4.8 amps provides enough power to simultaneously charge any combination of devices at full speed.
Surge protection, short circuit protection and more advanced safety features keep your devices safe.

For additional peace of mind, the Anker PowerCore 20100 comes with an 18 month warranty and easily accessible customer service.
It currently averages 4.7 out of 5 stars on Amazon from over 9,200 people (84% rate it 5 stars -- read reviews). With a regular list price of $79.99, Amazon has it discounted by $46, making it available right now for just $33.99. To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Apple returned to growth in Q1 of 2017, and it expects to continue in Q2.
"Closed loop supply chain" aims to reduce waste and cut down on mining.
One of the world's highest capacity portable chargers.

Charge Zendure while charging your devices at full speed with a single wall charger, a feature rarely seen in other power banks.

The QC port outputs 5-6V/3.0A,6-9V/2.0A,9-12V/1.5A (18W Max) when...
While we’re still waiting for a fresh iPad with barely there bezels to make an appearance, Apple has returned to its roots with a new 9.7-inch model simply called iPad.

And if you had previously balked at buying an iPad Air 2 because the price was too high, you might want to take notice.Apple hasn’t technically added a new model to the iPad lineup, but it has bolstered the low end.

Gone is the aging iPad Air 2 (as well as the whole Air branding), and in its place is a new model that looks exactly the same, with a 9.7-inch retina screen, Touch ID, 32GB or 128GB of storage, and the same color choices (silver, gold, and space gray). On the inside you’ll get an A9 chip—the same one that’s in the iPhone 6s—and the usual 10-hour battery.

That’s a relatively small upgrade over the 8X chip that was in the iPad Air 2, but the difference here isn’t in performance, it’s in price.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Software fixes follow a recall program announced late last year.
Company is expected to return to year-over-year growth after being down in 2016.
Whether you received a new iPhone for the holidays or you just want to breathe new life into an older one, these are the apps you need. The returns are in, and we're declaring our slate of winning iPhone apps. There were no votes cast, however, nor...
At the 2016 mobile Pwn2Own event, held on Oct. 26 in Tokyo, security researchers were able to exploit devices that vendors had fully patched.
In total, Trend Micro's Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) awarded $215,000 to researchers for security flaws in an And...
Keen hackers at Mobile Pwn2Own The Nexus 6P appears to have been hacked with attackers at the Mobile Pwn2Own contest installing malware without user interaction in less than five minutes. The hack by China's Keen Team happened minutes ago at the Tokyo event and does not require users to do anything. It is as of the time of writing yet to be confirmed but contest organisers tell El Reg they are confident of its legitimacy. Mobile Pwn2Own at the PacSec security conference in Japan pits hackers against the latest phones for a share of US$375,000 (£308,000, A$487,000) handed out by Trend Micro's Zero Day Initiative. The Nexus 6P, Apple iPhone 6S, and Samsung Galaxy S7 will be targeted by hackers who have over previous months developed tailored and often highly-sophisticated chained exploits against the device. Hackers of noted exploit crew Keen Team stand to win US$100,000 (£82,000, A$130,000) in prizes should the 6P hack be confirmed. MWR Labs hackers Robert Miller and Georgi Geshev will within hours also target the Nexus 6P in a bid to install a malicious application, and will score the US$100,000 prize even if Keen's exploit is confirmed. Keen will also target the iPhone 6S attempting to install another rogue application on the stock and updated device for a prize of US$125,000 (£103,000, A$162,000) The team will then return in a bid to rip photos from a locked iPhone 6S.
If successful the crew will bag US$50,000 (£41,000, A$65,000). Each team under the contest rules has five minutes, over three attempts for a total of 20 minutes to pop devices. Keen hacked the Nexus 6P on its first attempt and used the remaining slots to add flair and style to the exploits in a bid to claim the Master of Pwn award worth US$25,000 (£21,000, A$32,000). Hacks can require users to browse to malicious content within the default browser or by viewing or receiving a malicious MMS/SMS messages. More to come. ®
Apparently your flesh is the equivalent of a 1950s modem Computer science researchers at the University of Washington are developing a technology to securely send data through the human body rather than wires or the air. Passwords sent over insecure networks are liable to sniffing. This well-understood problem is most easily mitigated against using VPN technology but now security academics have taken a left-field approach to the same problem which also guards against the risk of vulnerabilities in custom radio protocols for wearables and implantables. The technology would work in conjunction with fingerprint sensors in the latest generation of smartphones. One use cited is opening a door fitted with an electronic smart lock. A user would touch the doorknob and the fingerprint sensor on their smartphone at the same time, with their credentials been transmitted through their body rather than over the air. The technology is not restricted by body type or posture, as a research paper by the researchers (abstract below) explains: We show for the first time that commodity devices can be used to generate wireless data transmissions that are confined to the human body. Specifically, we show that commodity input devices such as fingerprint sensors and touchpads can be used to transmit information to only wireless receivers that are in contact with the body. We characterize the propagation of the resulting transmissions across the whole body and run experiments with ten subjects to demonstrate that our approach generalizes across different body types and postures. We also evaluate our communication system in the presence of interference from other wearable devices such as smartwatches and nearby metallic surfaces. Finally, by modulating the operations of these input devices, we demonstrate bit rates of up to 50 bits per second over the human body. The approach works because fingerprint sensors “produce characteristic electromagnetic signals at frequencies below 10 MHz” that propagate well through the human body. The researchers ran tests using iPhone 5s and iPhone 6s fingerprint sensors, the Verifi P5100 USB fingerprint scanner, and both Lenovo T440s and Adafruit touch pads. Interference from wearable or metallic objects a users might have about them (such as watches) wasn’t a problem. The data transmission rate achieved of just 25 bits per second, or “less than a quarter the speed of a 1950s modem”, as security blogger Bill Camarda notes, might well be a limitation though. “It’s a long way from a university research lab to your body, but if this proves out, multiple applications are possible,” Camarda adds in a post on the Sophos Naked Security blog. “Instead of manually typing in a secret serial number or password for wirelessly pairing medical devices such as glucose or blood pressure monitors with smartphones, a smartphone could directly transmit arbitrary secret keys through the human body. Of course, having your body as the transmission medium brings a whole new set of security concerns about man-in-the-middle attacks,” he concludes. ®