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Facebook stops location sharing in Italy after losing copyright suit

Court ordered Facebook to suspend the feature or pay 5,000 euros per day.

Mobile malware evolution 2016

In 2016, the growth in the number of advertising Trojans capable of exploiting super-user rights continued.

Throughout the year it was the No. 1 threat, and we see no sign of this trend changing.

Russia Suspect In Italian Ministry Hack

Italy's foreign ministry was victim of a cyberattack last year, but hackers did not gain access to classified information.

Malwarebytes acquires Italian security firm Saferbytes

The Italian startup's offerings are destined to join the Malwarebytes enterprise portfolio.

Microsoft fixes remote desktop app Mac hole

Full read/write access was there for the taking Microsoft has patched a code execution hole in its Mac remote desktop client that grants read and write to home directories if users do no more than click a link, says Italian security researcher Filippo Cavallarin. The hole was patched 17 January. Cavallarin says the flaw allowed remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable machines if users did not more than click phishing links. From there, attackers would gain read and write access to Mac home directories. "Microsoft Remote Desktop Client for Mac OS X allows a malicious terminal server to read and write any file in the home directory of the connecting user," Cavallarin says. "The vulnerability exists to the way the application handles rdp urls.
In the rdp url schema it's possible to specify a parameter that will make the user's home directory accessible to the server without any warning or confirmation request. "If an attacker can trick a user to open a malicious rdp url, they can read and write any file within the victim's home directory." Mac OS X apps like Safari, Mail, and Messages by default open clicked rdp urls without confirmation. Youtube Video This drastically shortens the attack chain of most phishing attacks which require users to be convinced by some form of narrative to open links and attachments, and again to fill out personal data and credentials into fake forms. Cavallarin included a proof-of-concept with his disclosure, increasing the need for users to apply the Microsoft updates. ® Sponsored: Want to know more about Privileged Access Management? Visit The Register's hub

Original “patent troll” law firm is shutting down

EnlargeAlan Levine/Flickr reader comments 7 Share this story The Chicago law firm that became synonymous with "patent troll"-type litigation is shutting down, following the death of founding partner Raymond Niro. The remaining partners of the Niro Law Firm are shuttering the firm, according to a report in Crain's Chicago Business. A core group, including Niro's son Dean Niro, will launch a new firm called Vitale Vickrey Niro & Gasey. "We wanted a new start," said Paul Vickrey, who became Niro Law's managing partner after Ray Niro passed away in September of last year. "The Niro firm has been synonymous with patent litigation, and a group of us wanted a new firm with a broader focus." While the move is directly connected to Niro's death, it's also a sign of the times. There's far less room in the new legal landscape for sharply crafted patent lawsuits against big companies, the kind of cases that could yield settlements or verdicts worth tens of millions of dollars. Pioneer for Patent Plaintiffs Raymond Niro made a name for himself in patent litigation back in the late 90s by representing a company called TechSearch that wanted to assert its patents in court. Intel, a defendant against TechSearch patents, came up with the term "patent troll" as a derogatory way to define the TechSearch's business model, which involved buying up patents and focusing solely on licensing and litigation. "Troll was a derivative of, er, me," Niro told IP Law & Business in 2001. "I'm the first." He was also one of the most successful. In an era when many patent lawsuits were criticized as nuisance litigation, defendants may not have agreed with Niro's views, but they knew he was willing and able to be a formidable force in front of a jury. Niro always maintained that he was standing up for the small inventor. Born in Pittsburgh, he was the son of a bricklayer who was also an Italian immigrant. After getting his degree in chemical engineering, he went on to law school at George Washington University. Many in the tech sector loathed Niro for lawsuits they deemed an abuse of the system. His more controversial actions included litigation campaigns like the one brought by Innovatio IP, which sent out more than 8,000 letters demanding license fees from small businesses like chain hotels and coffee shops. Niro had a heart attack while vacationing in Italy in 2015. Crain's reported that he won more than $1 billion in settlements and jury verdicts over the course of his two decades in the patent trenches. He was 73 years old. By then, his firm was already shrinking, having gone from 30 lawyers to 14. After the Supreme Court's Alice and Octane Fitness cases were decided in 2014, the kind of high-stakes patent litigation Niro was an expert at became riskier. In 2015, the Niro firm was ordered to pay more than $4 million in legal fees to HTC due to a court's finding that Niro lawyers knew an inventor had made false statements to the US Patent and Trademark Office. "The stand-alone patent case is dead on arrival, and I don't think we're unique," Niro told Crain's Chicago Business a few months before his death.

Brother-and-sister duo arrested over hacking campaign targeting Italy’s bigwigs

EyePyramid operation targeted politicians and business leaders A hacking operation featuring the EyePyramid trojan successfully compromised the systems of numerous high-profile Italian targets, including two former prime ministers, say Italian police. High-profile targets were targeted by a spear-phishing campaign that served a remote-access trojan codenamed "EyePyramid" as a malicious attachment. Targets of the spying included bankers, businessmen and even several cardinals.

The president of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi, and two former Italian prime ministers, Matteo Renzi and Mario Monti, were among targets of the campaign, according to a copy of an Italian arrest warrant obtained by Politico. The malware was used to successfully exfiltrate over 87 gigabytes worth of data – including usernames, passwords, browsing data, and other files – from compromised systems. Federico Maggi, a senior threat researcher at Trend Micro, has published a blog post here and in a technical summary (on GitHub) here. Brother and sister Giulio Occhionero, 45, and Maria Occhionero, 48, were arrested in Rome on Tuesday and detained over hacking and espionage charges related to the EyePyramid campaign, Reuters reports.
Investigators appear to be proceeding on the basis that the hacking operation was used to harvest insider intelligence as part of a criminally tainted investment strategy rather than politically motivated cyber-espionage. The "stolen data was stored in servers in Prior Lake, Minnesota, and Salt Lake City, Utah," according to a court document seen by Reuters. The FBI has seized the servers and will ship them to Italy, the head of Italy's cyber crime unit told the news agency. Hackers behind the spear-phishing campaign used the compromised email accounts of attorneys and associates in several law firms as a platform to launch the second stage of the attacks, targeting businessmen and politicians, according to Trend Micro's Maggi. ® Bootnote Grazie molto to Milan-based reader Alex for the heads-up on this interesting case, which is unsurprisingly getting a lot of coverage in the Italian press. Sponsored: Want to know more about Privileged Access Management? Visit The Register's hub

The “EyePyramid” attacks

On January 10, 2017, a court order was declassified by the Italian police, in regards to a chain of cyberattacks directed at top Italian government members and institutions. The attacks leveraged a malware named “EyePyramid” to target a dozen politicians, bankers, prominent freemasons and law enforcement personalities in Italy.

These included Fabrizio Saccomanni, the former deputy governor of the Bank of Italy, Piero Fassino, the former mayor of Turin, several members of a Masonic lodge, Matteo Renzi, former prime minister of Italy and Mario Draghi, another former prime minister of Italy and now president of the European Central Bank. The malware was spread using spear-phishing emails and the level of sophistication is low. However, the malware is flexible enough to grant access to all the resources in the victim’s computer. During the investigation, involved LEAs found more than 100 active victims in the server used to host the malware, as well as indications that during the last few years the attackers had targeted around 16,000 victims.

All identified victims are in Italy, most of them being Law Firms, Consultancy services, Universities and even Vatican Cardinals. Evidence found on the C&C servers suggests that the campaign was active since at least March 2014 and lasted until August 2016. However, it is suspected that the malware was developed and probably used years before, possibly as far back to 2008. Two suspects were arrested on January 10th, 2017 and identified as 45-year-old nuclear engineer Giulio Occhionero and his 47-year-old sister Francesca Maria Occhionero. Investigation Although the Italian Police Report doesn’t include malware hashes, it identified a number of C&C servers and e-mails addresses used by the malware for exfiltration of stolen data. Excerpt from the Italian court order on #EyePyramid(http://www.agi.it/pictures/pdf/agi/agi/2017/01/10/132733992-5cec4d88-49a1-4a00-8a01-dde65baa5a68.pdf) Some of the e-mail addresses used for exfiltration and C&C domains outlined by the police report follow: E-mail Addresses used for exfiltration gpool@hostpenta[.]com hanger@hostpenta[.]com hostpenta@hostpenta[.]com purge626@gmail[.]com tip848@gmail[.]com dude626@gmail[.]com octo424@gmail[.]com tim11235@gmail[.]com plars575@gmail[.]com Command-and-Control Servers eyepyramid[.]com hostpenta[.]com ayexisfitness[.]com enasrl[.]com eurecoove[.]com marashen[.]com millertaylor[.]com occhionero[.]com occhionero[.]info wallserv[.]com westlands[.]com Based on these indicators we’ve quickly written a YARA rule and ran it through our systems, in order to see if it matches any samples. Here’s how our initial “blind”-written YARA rule looked like: rule crime_ZZ_EyePyramid { meta: copyright = ” Kaspersky Lab”author = ” Kaspersky Lab”maltype = “crimeware”filetype = “Win32 EXE”date = “2016-01-11”version = “1.0” strings: $a0=”eyepyramid.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a1=”hostpenta.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a2=”ayexisfitness.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a3=”enasrl.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a4=”eurecoove.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a5=”marashen.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a6=”millertaylor.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a7=”occhionero.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a8=”occhionero.info” ascii wide nocase fullword$a9=”wallserv.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a10=”westlands.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a11=”217.115.113.181″ ascii wide nocase fullword$a12=”216.176.180.188″ ascii wide nocase fullword$a13=”65.98.88.29″ ascii wide nocase fullword$a14=”199.15.251.75″ ascii wide nocase fullword$a15=”216.176.180.181″ ascii wide nocase fullword$a16=”MN600-849590C695DFD9BF69481597241E-668C” ascii wide nocase fullword$a17=”MN600-841597241E8D9BF6949590C695DF-774D” ascii wide nocase fullword$a18=”MN600-3E3A3C593AD5BAF50F55A4ED60F0-385D” ascii wide nocase fullword$a19=”MN600-AD58AF50F55A60E043E3A3C593ED-874A” ascii wide nocase fullword$a20=”gpool@hostpenta.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a21=”hanger@hostpenta.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a22=”hostpenta@hostpenta.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a23=”ulpi715@gmx.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$b0=”purge626@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b1=”tip848@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b2=”dude626@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b3=”octo424@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b4=”antoniaf@poste.it” ascii wide fullword$b5=”mmarcucci@virgilio.it” ascii wide fullword$b6=”i.julia@blu.it” ascii wide fullword$b7=”g.simeoni@inwind.it” ascii wide fullword$b8=”g.latagliata@live.com” ascii wide fullword$b9=”rita.p@blu.it” ascii wide fullword$b10=”b.gaetani@live.com” ascii wide fullword$b11=”gpierpaolo@tin.it” ascii wide fullword$b12=”e.barbara@poste.it” ascii wide fullword$b13=”stoccod@libero.it” ascii wide fullword$b14=”g.capezzone@virgilio.it” ascii wide fullword$b15=”baldarim@blu.it” ascii wide fullword$b16=”elsajuliette@blu.it” ascii wide fullword$b17=”dipriamoj@alice.it” ascii wide fullword$b18=”izabelle.d@blu.it” ascii wide fullword$b19=”lu_1974@hotmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b20=”tim11235@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b21=”plars575@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b22=”guess515@fastmail.fm” ascii wide fullword condition: ((uint16(0) == 0x5A4D)) and (filesize < 10MB) and((any of ($a*)) or (any of ($b*)) )} To build the YARA rule above we’ve used every bit of existing information, such as custom e-mail addresses used for exfiltration, C&C servers, licenses for the custom mailing library used by the attackers and specific IP addresses used in the attacks. Once the YARA rule was ready, we’ve ran it on our malware collections.

Two of the initial hits were: MD5 778d103face6ad7186596fb0ba2399f2 File size 1396224 bytes Type Win32 PE file Compilation Timestamp Fri Nov 19 12:25:00 2010 MD5 47bea4236184c21e89bd1c1af3e52c86 File size 1307648 bytes Type Win32 PE file Compilation timestamp Fri Sep 17 11:48:59 2010 These two samples allowed us to write a more specific and more effective YARA rule which identified 42 other samples in our summary collections. At the end of this blogpost we include a full list of all related samples identified. Although very thorough, the Police Report does not include any technical details about how the malware was spread other than the use of spear phishing messages with malicious attachments using spoofed email addresses. Nevertheless, once we were able to identify the samples shown above we used our telemetry to find additional ones used by the attackers for spreading the malware in spear-phishing emails.

For example: From: Di Marco GianmariaSubject: ricezione e attivazioneTime:2014/01/29 13:57:42Attachment: contatto.zip//Primarie.accdb (…) .exe From: Michelangelo GiorgianniSubject: R: Re: CONVOCAZIONE]Time: 2014/01/28 17:28:56]Attachment: Note.zip//sistemi.pdf (…) .exe Other attachment filenames observed in attacks include: Nuoveassunzioni.7z Assunzione.7z Segnalazioni.doc (…) 7z.exe Regione.7z Energy.7z Risparmio.7z Pagati.7z Final Eight 2012 Suggerimenti Uso Auricolari.exe Fwd Re olio di colza aggiornamento prezzo.exe Approfondimento.7z Allegato.zip Eventi.bmp (…) .exe Quotidiano.mdb (…) _7z.exe Notifica operazioni in sospeso.exe As can be seen the spreading relied on spearphishing e-mails with attachments, which relied on social engineering to get the victim to open and execute the attachment.

The attachments were ZIP and 7zip archives, which contained the EyePyramid malware. Also the attackers relied on executable files masking the extension of the file with multiple spaces.

This technique is significant in terms of the low sophistication level of this attack. High profile victims Potential high-profile Italian victims (found as recipients of spear-phishing emails according to the police report) include very relevant Italian politicians such as Matteo Renzi or Mario Draghi. It should be noted however there is no proof than any of them got successfully infected by EyePyramid – only that they were targeted. Of the more than 100 active victims found in the server, there’s a heavy interest in Italian law firms and lawyers.

Further standout victims, organizations, and verticals include: Professional firms, Consultants Universities Vaticano Construction firms Healthcare Based on the KSN data for the EyePyramid malware, we observed 92 cases in which the malware was blocked, of which the vast majority (80%) of them were in Italy. Other countries where EyePyramid has been detected includes France, Indonesia, Monaco, Mexico, China, Taiwan, Germany and Poland. Assuming their compilation timestamp are legit – and they do appear correct, most of the samples used in the attacks have been compiled in 2014 and 2015. Conclusions Although the “EyePyramid” malware used by the two suspects is neither sophisticated nor very hard to detect, their operation successfully compromised a large number of victims, including high-profile individuals, resulting in the theft of tens of gigabytes of data. In general, the operation had very poor OPSEC (operational security); the suspects used IP addresses associated with their company in the attacks, discussed the victims using regular phone calls and through WhatsApp and, when caught, attempted to delete all the evidence. This indicates they weren’t experts in the field but merely amateurs, who nevertheless succeeded in stealing considerably large amounts of data from their victims. As seen from other known cyberespionage operations, it’s not necessary for the attackers to use high profile malware, rootkits, or zero-days to run long-standing cyberespionage operations. Perhaps the most surprising element of this story is that Giulio Occhionero and Francesca Maria Occhionero ran this cyber espionage operation for many years before getting caught. Kaspersky Lab products successfully detect and remove EyePyramid samples with these verdicts: HEUR:Trojan.Win32.Generic Trojan.Win32.AntiAV.choz Trojan.Win32.AntiAV.ciok Trojan.Win32.AntiAV.cisb Trojan.Win32.AntiAV.ciyk not-a-virus:HEUR:PSWTool.Win32.Generic not-a-virus:PSWTool.Win32.NetPass.aku A full report #EyePyramid, including technical details of the malware, is available to customers of Kaspersky APT Intelligence Services.

Contact: intelreports (at) kaspersky [dot] com
. To learn how to write YARA rules like a GReAT Ninja, consider taking a master class at Security Analyst Summit. – https://sas.kaspersky.com/#trainings References and Third-Party Articles Indicators of Compromise Hashes: 09ff13b020de3629b0547e0312a6c135102bccd95e5d8a56c4f7e8b902f5fb7112f3635ab1de63fbcb5e1c492424c6051391d37c6b809f48be7f09aa0dab76571498b8d6e946b5d6b529abea1359238114db577a9b0bfc62f3a25a9a51765bc517af7e00936dcc8af376ad899501ad8b192d5866cbfafae36d5ba321c817bc14325f5d379c4d091743ca8581f15d329536bd8feed1b17c59f3c653e6427661a4380b0f1921fed82e1b68b4e442b04f053c30f0114c600510fdb2573cc48d5c063fed695e2a6e63d971c16fd9e825fec547bea4236184c21e89bd1c1af3e52c8647dd1e017aae694abd2b7bc0b12cf1da47f1f9b1339147fe2d13772b4cb8103053b41dc0b8fd9663047f71bc91a317df5bc1b8c07c0f83d438a3e891dc3899545eb17f400f38c1b65990a8d60c298d956de1e478301d59ac14b8e9636b53815d75621de46a12234af0bec15620be6763778d103face6ad7186596fb0ba2399f2859f60cd5d0f0fbd91bde3c3914cbb188afb6488655cbea2737d2423843ea0779173aefe64b7704510c873e2ce7305e092c32eb72f5713ca1f2a8dc918f1f770932bd2ad79cbca4341d853a4b5ea1da594eff87eca2f054aa5fbc1877a6cf91998825a1ce35f46d004c0839e87cc27789b8571b5281f3751750d3099049098e09c57839b3f8462bd6c2d36db80cd5ecc9d3ce3246975ae6d545ee9e8ba12d1649d4b46d3c389e0144238c821670f8537a41c5374a14a2c7cbe093ff6b075e8acb39a673a5d2ceaa1fb5571769097ca77b533b082ed1458c482c3663ee12dc3a4bcfd544df7d8e9a2efe9d2ed32e74cadc0243741bfece772f02d1657dc057229c38e9edc0e4b18ff1fc5b61b771f7946ce76b690dc98844c721e6337cd5e7f4bcf391937d79ed6650893b1d5fbed0604d8432ddec880800bfa060af1f8c2e405eb604e7e27727a410fc226196c13afe9fafd293065daf126a9ad9562fc0b00b2 Related hashes identified by @GaborSzappanos: 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 Backdoor Filenames: pnbwz.exepxcfx.exeqislg.exerqklt.exerunwt.exeruzvs.exervhct.exevidhdw.exewinlng.exewxrun.exexddrv.exexdwdrv.exe Malicious attachments filenames (weak indicators): contatto.zip//Primarie.accdb (…) .exeNote.zip//sistemi.pdf (…) .exeNuoveassunzioni.7zAssunzione.7zSegnalazioni.doc (…) 7z.exeRegione.7zEnergy.7zRisparmio.7zPagati.7zFinal Eight 2012 Suggerimenti Uso Auricolari.exeFwd Re olio di colza aggiornamento prezzo.exeApprofondimento.7zAllegato.zipEventi.bmp (…) .exeQuotidiano.mdb (…) _7z.exe

How to hunt for rare malware

At SAS 2017, on April 1st and 2nd on St. Maarten, Global Director of GReAT Costin Raiu and Principal Security Researchers Vitaly Kamluk and Sergey Mineev will provide YARA training for incident response specialists and malware researchers, who need an effective arsenal for finding malware.

During the training, the experts will give participants access to some of Kaspersky Lab internal systems, which are otherwise closed to the public, to demonstrate how the company’s malware analysts catch rare samples.

After two days, even being a newcomer, you’ll walk away with the ability to write rules and start using the tool for hunting malware. You can book your seat now — the class will be limited for maximum 15 participants. Each trainer has an impressive portfolio of cyber-espionage campaigns that they have investigated, including Stuxnet, Duqu, Flame, Gauss, Red October, MiniDuke, Turla, Careto/TheMask, Carbanak and Duqu2. Why YARA training? Protective measures that were effective yesterday don’t guarantee the same level of security tomorrow.
Indicators of Compromise (IoCs) can help you search for footprints of known malware or for an active infection.

But serious threat actors have started to tailor their tools to fit each victim, thus making IoCs much less effective.

But good YARA detection rules still allow analysts to find malware, exploits and 0-days which couldn’t be found in any other way.

The rules can be deployed in networks and on various multi scanner systems. Giveaways People who go through the training will be able to start writing relatively complex YARA rules for malware – from polymorphic keyloggers all the way up to highly complex malware – that can’t be detected easily with strings.

The GReAT trainers will teach how to balance rules, in other words how to write detection rules while minimising the risk of false-positives.

They also will share their experience of what exactly they are looking for when they write YARA rules as part of their everyday jobs. What are the requirements for participation? You don’t have to be an expert in order to go through this training.
It’s enough to have basic knowledge of how to use a TextEditor and the UNIX grep tool, and a basic understanding of what computer viruses are and what binary formats look like. You’ll also need your laptop and YARA software v. 3.4.0 installed on the machine.

Experience with malware analysis, reverse engineering and programming (especially in structured languages) will help you to learn more quickly, but this doesn’t mean that you can’t learn without it. Catching a 0-day with YARA One of the most remarkable cases in which Kaspersky Lab’s GReAT used YARA was the very famous Silverlight 0-day: the team started hunting for this after Hacking Team, the Italian company selling “legal surveillance tools” for governments and LEAs, was hacked. One of the stories in the media attracted our researchers’ attention — according to the article, a programmer offered to sell Hacking Team a Silverlight 0-day, an exploit for an obsolete Microsoft plug-in which at some point had been installed on a huge number of computers. GReAT decided to create a YARA rule based on this programmer’s older, publicly available proof-of-concept exploits. Our researchers found that he had a very particular style when coding the exploits — he used very specific comments, shell code and function names.

All of this unique information was used to write a YARA rule — the experts set it to carry out a clear task, basically saying “Go and hunt for any piece of malware that shows the characteristics described in the rule”.

Eventually it caught a new sample, it was a 0-day, and the team reported it to Microsoft immediately. If you’re a scholar… Surprisingly enough, YARA can be used for any sort of classification, such as finding documents by metadata, email and so on.
If you work with any kind of rare information and lack a competitive tool for searching for it, come to St. Maarten in April and join the training — you’ll benefit greatly. You are welcome to listen the podcast to learn about how YARA can be used in malware hunting, data analysis and incident response activities. Book a seat at sas.kaspersky.com now to hunt APTs with YARA like a GReAT ninja!

Security Experts: IoT Will Be Biggest Threat Of The Next Decade

The Internet of Things will be at the center of enterprise security and infrastructure readiness for the next several years, a panel of security experts said at Intel Security's Focus 16 in Las Vegas.

"It's going to be the story of the next decade. We're probably just in the first inning when it comes to connected devices," Optiv CFO Dave Roshak said on the panel.

While consumer use of connected devices is growing, Roshak said he sees IoT starting to gain traction in enterprises. He said Optiv, for example, is already helping enterprises use IoT to become nimbler in their business processes.

That's a huge opportunity for solution providers who can have those security conversations around IoT, he said.

[Related: Q&A: Future McAfee CEO Chris Young On New Products, Spinout From Intel And Cybersecurity In The Election]

"I think it's a unique opportunity from a security standpoint to be baked in from the beginning of that process, as opposed to being brought in as an afterthought," Roshak said.

And, from where companies stand today, they are wholly unable to handle these emerging threats, Tony Gigliotti, president of Autonomic Software, said.

"I just look at [the Internet of Things] and I say to myself, if we're not careful, this thing could get messier than a food fight in an Italian restaurant … I just don't know how we are going to handle it from where we stand today," Gigliotti said.

One example of where IoT can have devastating effects, if not implemented properly, is in the national power grid, Ted Koppel, renowned journalist and author of Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath, said in a keynote presentation following the panel.

As computer systems and IoT devices are used to optimize the power grid and keep an appropriate balance of power in the systems, Koppel said there is a huge risk of a catastrophic outage from hackers and nation-state attacks. He said evidence has already shown hackers from Russia, China and more poking around in those environments, readying for an attack if necessary.

"It isn’t a question of 'if,' it's a question of 'when,'" Koppel said. He said the government and companies need to start preparing now to minimize the impact of an attack, as well as take measures to prepare in the event of an attack, including lining up food, resources and a plan of action.

Hackers Release New Malware Into The Wild For Mirai Botnet Successor

Symantec A group of cyberattackers has created a new strain of malware dedicated to transforming vulnerable IoT devices into slave components for DDoS attacks. The new malware, dubbed Linux/IRCTelnet, was discovered by researchers who posted an analysi...

The “notification” ransomware lands in Brazil

It’s unusual for a day to go by without finding some new variant of a known ransomware, or, what is even more interesting, a completely new one. Unlike the previously reported and now decrypted Xpan ransomware, this same-but-different threat from Brazil has recently been spotted in the wild.

This time the infection vector is not a targeted remote desktop intrusion, but a more massively propagated malicious campaign relying on traditional spam email. Since the infection is not done manually by the bad guys, their malware has a higher chance of being detected and we believe that is one of the reasons for them to have added one more level of protection to the code, resorting to a binary dropper to launch the malicious payload. Given that this particular ransomware is fairly well known by now, instead of opting for the usual branding and marketing efforts in which most ransomware authors invest time, this group has decided to choose an unnamed campaign, showing only an email address for technical support and a bitcoin address for making the payment.
It has become a kind of urban legend that if you can’t find something on Google, then it doesn’t exist. Not very long ago, we saw the birth of truly autochthonous Brazilian ransomware, without much technical sophistication and mainly based on an open-source project. While there’s a long road ahead for local bad guys to achieve the level of the key players on the ransomware scene, this particular family is interesting to study since there have been versions in English, Italian, and now Brazilian Portuguese.
Is this ransomware being sold as a commodity in underground forums with Brazilian crews just standing on the shoulders of giants? Or is this a regional operation just starting out? As one of the very few ransomware variants that prepend a custom ‘Lock.’ extension to the encrypted files instead of appending it, the task of recognizing this malware is not particularly difficult. However, understanding its true origins could still be considered an ongoing debate. The drop If we trust that the first transaction corresponds to the very first victim, the campaign has probably been active since 2016-04-04 17:29:26 (April 4th, 2016).
In reality, this is not exactly accurate.

The timestamp of the original dropper shows that the sample was actually compiled at the beginning of October: That would mean that the criminal behind the campaign might have had different ransomware campaigns running in the past, or is just using the same BTC wallet for more than his criminal deeds. The dropper is protected by the popular .NET obfuscator SmartAssembly, as can be seen by the string “Powered by SmartAssembly 6.9.0.114”. Once executed, it tries to mask itself in the Alternate Data Stream of the NTFS file system in Windows: “%APPDATA%\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup\Sims.exe:Zone.Identifier It’s capable of disabling Windows LUA protection: “HKLM\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\WINDOWS\CURRENTVERSION\POLICIES\SYSTEM”; Key: “ENABLELUA”; Value: “00000000”(cmd.exe /c %WINDIR%\System32\reg.exe ADD HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System /v EnableLUA /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /fReg.exe ADD HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System /v EnableLUA /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f) The mechanism used to write new information to the registry is quite unusual: it uses the official windows application ‘migwiz.exe’ in order to bypass the UAC screen, not requiring any action from the user to execute with elevated privileges. The malware is able to do that by writing a library ‘cryptbase.dll’ to the same folder as the ‘migwiz.exe’ file.

Then, as soon as it’s launched, the process will load this library, which has a WinExec call that will launch the command line provided by the parameter. The reason why they are using MigWiz is because this process is one that is in Microsoft’s auto-elevate list, meaning it can be elevated without asking for explicit permission. As a simple mean of information gathering, the dropper will read the name of the infected computer: HKLM\SYSTEM\CONTROLSET001\CONTROL\COMPUTERNAME\ACTIVECOMPUTERNAME”; Key: “COMPUTERNAME Moreover, it includes data stealer techniques, such as retrieving information from the clipboard, or while it’s being typed on the keyboard.

Additionally it has the capability to reboot the user’s machine. @4333be: push ebp@4333bf: mov ebp, esp@4333c1: sub esp, 14h@4333c4: push ebx@4333c5: mov ebx, dword ptr [ebp+08h]@4333c8: lea eax, dword ptr [ebp-04h]@4333cb: push eax@4333cc: push 00000028h@4333ce: call dword ptr [00482310h] ;GetCurrentProcess@KERNEL32.DLL@4333d4: push eax@4333d5: call dword ptr [0048202Ch] ;OpenProcessToken@ADVAPI32.DLL@4333db: test eax, eax@4333dd: je 0043341Eh@4333df: lea ecx, dword ptr [ebp-10h]@4333e2: push ecx@4333e3: push 00487D68h ;SeShutdownPrivilege Finally, it drops and executes the file tmp.exe (corresponding hash B4FDC93E0C089F6B885FFC13024E4B9). Hello sir, hello madam, your fines have been locked After the infection has been completed, as is usual in all ransomware families, the ransom note is shown.

This time, it is written in Brazilian Portuguese and demanding 2000 BRL, which equates to around 627 USD or 1 BTC at the time of writing. The bitcoin address provided (1LaHiL3vTGdbXnzyQ9omsYt8nFkUafXzK4) for payment shows total deposits for 1.89 BTC although many transactions have been made since the creation of this wallet.

This is leading us to believe that either the criminal has been using the wallet for other purposes or they have bargaining with the victims and offering them a lower price, as depicted by the amount in each transaction. The ransom note is very succinct, without giving any special payment URL or any other type of information.

The victim will have to learn about bitcoin payments the hard way, and should they need support they can reach the criminals through a single email point of contact. AVISOOla Sr(a),TODOS os seus arquivos foram BLOQUEADOS e esse bloqueio somente serão DESBLOQUEADOScaso pague um valor em R$ 2000,00 (dois Mil reais) em BitcoinsApós o pagamento desse valor, basta me enviar um print para o emailinfomacaoh@gmail.comque estarei lhe enviando o programa com a senha para descriptografar/desbloquear o seus arquivos.Caso o pagamento não seja efetuado, todos os seus dados serão bloqueadospermanentemente e o seu computador sera totalmente formatado(Perdendo assim, todas as informações contidas nele, incluindo senhas de email, bancárias…)O pagamento deverá ser efetuado nesse endereço de Bitcoin:1LaHiL3vTGdbXnzyQ9omsYt8nFkUafXzK4Para converter seu saldo em bitcoins acesse o site:https://www.mercadobitcoin.com.br/conta/register/ Growth of ransomware in Brazil The growth of ransomware in Brazil has been nothing short of impressive, taking into consideration that during October 2016 alone the popular ransomware family Trojan-Ransom.NSIS.MyxaHaTpyne.gen family grew by 287.96%, and another of the usual suspects Trojan-Ransom.Win32.CryptXXX.gen grew by 56.96%, (when compared to the previous month in each case.) In 2016, the 3 most important families of ransomware have been Trojan-Ransom.Win32.Blocker, accounting for 49.63% of the total infections, Trojan-Ransom.NSIS.Onion, 29.09%, and Trojan-Ransom.Win32.Locky, 3.99%. Currently, Brazil is the eighth most affected country worldwide as far as ransomware infections go for this year, and ranked first in Latin America. Indicators of compromise File: 04.exeSize: 1049600MD5: 86C85BD08DFAC63DF65EAEAE82ED14F7Compiled: Saturday, October 8 2016, 11:22:30 – 32 Bit .NET File: tmp.exeSize: 842220MD5: BB4FDC93E0C089F6B885FFC13024E4B9Compiled: Sunday, January 29 2012, 21:32:28 – 32 Bit