19.3 C
London
Tuesday, September 26, 2017
Home Tags Kaspersky

Tag: Kaspersky

We're already used to the fact that complex cyberattacks use 0-day vulnerabilities, bypassing digital signature checks, virtual file systems, non-standard encryption algorithms and other tricks.
Sometimes, however, all of this may be done in much simpler ways, as was the case in the malicious campaign that we detected a while ago – we named it 'Microcin' after microini, one of the malicious components used in it.
The Russian firm won a tender to supply cybersecurity tools to the three military organizations in the Latin American country.
In the field of information security, sandboxes are used to isolate an insecure external environment from a secure internal environment (or vice versa), to protect against the exploitation of vulnerabilities, and to analyze malicious code.

At Kaspersky Lab, we have several sandboxes, we will look at just one of them that was customized to serve the needs of a specific product and became the basis of Kaspersky Anti Targeted Attack Platform.
A little while back we were investigating the malicious activities of the Freakyshelly targeted attack and came across spear phishing emails that had some interesting documents attached to them.

They were in OLE2 format and contained no macros, exploits or any other active content.
DAILY VIDEO: DHS bans federal agencies from using Kaspersky security products; Yelp says Google is still using its content in violation of an FTC agreement; Bing image search gets a machine learning boost; and there's more.
Federal agencies have 90 days to remove Kaspersky Lab software from their systems.
The president cites concern that the Russia-based company could be influenced by the Kremlin.
Government departments have 90 days to rip and replace Despite pending legislation to ban US federal government offices from using Kaspersky Lab security software, Homeland Security has issued a Binding Operational Directive demanding that the products be removed within 90 days.…
Kaspersky: We have “never helped, nor will help, any government with cyberespionage.”
Within 90 days, federal agencies must find all instances of Kaspersky Lab products on their net-works and remove them, according to the U.S.

Department of Homeland Security.