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Tag: Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)

Joomla on Tuesday patched a critical LDAP injection vulnerability that had lingered in the content management system for eight years.

Attackers could use this bug to steal admin login credentials.

DDoS attacks in Q2 2017

The second quarter quite clearly showed that the DDoS-attack threat is perceived rather seriously.
Some companies were prepared to pay cybercriminals literally after their first demand without waiting for the attack itself.

This set off a whole new wave of fraud involving money extortion under threat of a DDoS attack, also known as “ransom DDoSrdquo;.
MapD, creator of a GPU-accelerated database that scales both up and out, has open-sourced its core technology.As announced in a press release and blog post, the core database and its "associated visualization libraries" are available under the Apache 2.0 license.

But enterprise-level features like the high availability, LDAP, ODBC, and horizontal scaling functionality—many of which debuted in the 3.0 version released earlier this month—will be kept close to the chest.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Each DDoS (distributed denial-of-service) attack seem to be larger than the last, and recent advisories from Akamai and Ixia indicate that attackers are stepping up their game.

As attackers expand their arsenal of reflection methods to target CLDAP ...
Akamai Networks since October has detected and mitigated at least 50 DDoS attacks using Connectionless LDAP.

DDoS attacks in Q4 2016

2016 was the year of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) with major disruptions in terms of technology, attack scale and impact on our daily life.
In fact, the year ended with massive DDoS attacks unseen before, leveraging Mirai botnet technology.
Nobody thinks of directory services like LDAP or Active Directory as fonts of innovation. But to Amazon, they are a starting point for building something new.A new public offering from Amazon called Cloud Directory aims to take the ho-hum idea behind a directory service—a hierarchical database—and endow it with features that make it useful to a far wider range of applications.[ Docker, Amazon, TensorFlow, Windows 10, and more: See InfoWorld's 2017 Technology of the Year Award winners. | Cut to the key news in technology trends and IT breakthroughs with the InfoWorld Daily newsletter, our summary of the top tech happenings. ]Move fast, change things—just don’t break them Cloud Directory is essentially a hierarchical database designed to allow the data stored inside to be seen via multiple hierarchies.

Amazon cites as an example a company org chart that can be navigated in multiple ways, such as by geography or reporting structure.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Updated freeradius packages that fix one bug are now available for Red HatEnterprise Linux 7. FreeRADIUS is a high-performance and highly configurable free RemoteAuthentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS) server, designed to allowcentralized authentication and authorization for a network.This update fixes the following bug:* Previously, the FreeRADIUS server exported symbols that were conflicting withsymbols defined in the libltdl library. When the FreeRADIUS server tried to opena connection to the MSSQL server using the rlm_sql_odbc interface and UnixODBCwas configured to use the FreeTDS library, the connection failed with thefollowing error message:"undefined symbol: get_vtable"This update renames the conflicting symbols. As a result, connections to MSSQLservers no longer fail in the described situation. (BZ#1394787)Users of freeradius are advised to upgrade to these updated packages, which fixthis bug. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (v. 7) SRPMS: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: 5e96632852397a55278fe7ad2409a29fSHA-256: 59509a3a66c6f70128580d87a3bf62c2f0d6d0ab85091993db83577756c2e27b   PPC: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: aaa2f1fe524aef8201e3772c173e2a34SHA-256: 0b688cafd42eeaa14d54e1e7f9546645d544ee475e9daadd1e02712abeeebcc0 freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc.rpm     MD5: af8723c15c2bfdacd412806d4ed706dcSHA-256: 858a8955723f9166bbeeda8612a57c56bdb7f8ab7634b37a434436ce50b3176b freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: ccbbe1acbcc2f8d6ed89e1163a794e9bSHA-256: 51c4b41197d27cebb8d1ba4f37e4786ba7230eca75cbac931339646213e4cfc1 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc.rpm     MD5: 5711896014d5f0c4e3d4e3401efef6d3SHA-256: 4a1d7c00c22fca5e4b9e3d1e6c6d45792665729be9092b97384ca2215123864e freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: b34c5265db6b567b8afb1cd48f03f64aSHA-256: e73f1521821ba950dd37cf2770486d332f7559207d3085b8b2d607d27d8592eb freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 3f37c3cdbb151bbc7dc67ab48d61e1a4SHA-256: 42c405e19145b88da6463a637b319abbbb29a6e1ec28044f7358a068d1371119 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: eec5c37d9a0ce12b10bbb2f05e9df053SHA-256: 924feb65d3def899c43fb9e87eeb88d56bee385cf7c4dd4dbd7a4f5ddcd28a3b freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 665c19ec33d00d18ee8b687c7a6dea4eSHA-256: cc745bc192933d19251695b3d2256f9e429852306ed95ad4937121bca2d2571e freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 9b2d94a819845f7bd16886e7bc0bf8ccSHA-256: ccb9084b9946b7f0d8cadeb206c8badeae04ac95dfcffd2058ee1ece636c337c freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 2b0026f1992724a1377c724df6c120d5SHA-256: 9451a7592fa6c72e56a1996e682fe30b4d075eed3eb573f865313af961ab25e9 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 9c91489ddc979db2c0e40b243785fc1eSHA-256: 22587e4769f76e26e6cca92216cb2d6459dfd82c90b916dcbe2b89764f7bee1e freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 8c027857f0dbe9bdcaabbb6de55e46b5SHA-256: 7f6c1699bb3db9a8fb9a44abf400949513444590a44ba338e9325c1000f7ad6f freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 73effd27c782ceaf261899457e274c6cSHA-256: 474a9099296e5bf94c27fb964daa30508d9f76c94155d47c1c3870d7e364a3d9 freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: f0877c023811b0f7fcc9a546445e70e3SHA-256: 701b77c5ec0e64fa197be7d20c011ef79a6bad990c2fb6fb09aa99a70b341124 freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 094f5cc85a92eaa7bac692a3e1fd0217SHA-256: c5ea975b4cc148c42d9ae3b00c0caa006afd3eab0f43a0813246401860240776   PPC64LE: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 5e0b1aa1289ffd43554db6275836c90bSHA-256: 07488616dfb9a8264cfc987103540d2dd5dfcc4abef53a2dc0f23c7e8f639bed freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 7e8a996e8d2efdd7c8383a3609c9da14SHA-256: b6652380de08e05cb23871b6c196e6aaf5758f0e6a03569f7d21b9cc0a930158 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: f2bde27a58cb26df2a3564570e7f9d72SHA-256: 9d5ec51588136c246ac1bbd59786a0b08f906f37db5dcab0e699feeb5b1f662c freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 5ee5af5e721f4413b181f8bfec827f55SHA-256: 11355cb8f27d55198bb1ca9428464696d538ab0cb0c1e6d51e8fe3d49fbe1b13 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 7dd0647b8e3ed9eefd25e0df23db3d0eSHA-256: 9d5f61c648cc9b03dbfefa812a7154e2f85977e02400a45a0701dcb5811691ea freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 5df80476f533797412b8ef8eac7fe692SHA-256: 84e2443b283cdbffdbe4235cab0c1ae92c9764381db43d010805954e3c2c780a freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 56b856e3e0e8094641ed6897b11ed69cSHA-256: 86b7b33b399241b27023ff7c202b47fb50aa11b29169b7196d90341dcab0582e freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 435d2f14683a8f51aecc804915fd9942SHA-256: 9bb3cac21d49fb7c715debd28159db6cb7ea1007b1f1f6772586f05f4593c541 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: a71ffb8ed42f59e433a2082431f2fe4aSHA-256: 2deebc15e1bf41f9e6cd8da602d167992078e7276dc6a57deca23e15310f57f3 freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 089e0d939a2c6ff7599cd8e40b312fd2SHA-256: bf87ab72234ed742862c845adf378c03b35457cc6cdfaafb8451b1aa42cd0a96 freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 59276f0ebe8cec373522d9b8872a6ca5SHA-256: 48ad2db3a6fb377ea34fd1b134038e55ebe2bab56103d552fa9844d43ae57bf5 freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: f341c876508f64042ff9362a8677bd7bSHA-256: 67279b74e6698fcc2c5fa374c376fbfc2d11481a4bf6c989980fb4d7f98cea3f freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 02d68a6b80678a76c9bcc57605be1e92SHA-256: e7df4369f9d61f3070299cb38581633084f9cc4e5ad4bd6974693443c0177892   s390x: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 52bae7512435f85815620a39b6a23d0cSHA-256: c7ac534e0457ab9a36d1caff3c087868c3d4fd342c21ca434ce8665108fca58d freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390.rpm     MD5: dc5025ddebe7a513846b3e0462f8603cSHA-256: e5474d9dde2ab8477c154b5399dc78d9aaaf4585b5a6d2938a0d2ae2b9a93fe1 freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 53e7b991142eab1a164767974d75caf3SHA-256: 1997c44040831b5b284f218ae485264ed52c822f86b07ca087028d6757514b48 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390.rpm     MD5: fe3fbd2d654bfc1b128e68a06f069553SHA-256: 0db215de1770b8208649656b01983cb0d1521907b791a3e85bd5ea4383f37303 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 25698d6d169d6f82be0c8aa190efbfa2SHA-256: f58348d68c3203f84c6f6e85f68568d8081cb7a227eac2dc110436ded1cf1d7f freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 39997fd4ccfde71b7717f18c41903697SHA-256: 2a8d8c80d4bb858276abf3cbf1af0995d34103c4d18cf8f55a7b80fe35badb06 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: ff536e3183408bc8a4ca37bd778ea3e4SHA-256: 5074472cdce0cfaedfaf24e5cea1ec565c1aadc693cca11ff10ac2b02c8e7469 freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 0f3aef5fb8d1ec941df5e6e18fcf6b57SHA-256: 3e03e2fbddfba25cc8432dbb363756aa513f749f1366786e92b495e92571896d freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 257cf4050b4681014e9ad1ede2c87d34SHA-256: f4e068f6e8df09d9d531cf814c82dedd661d1bea447c78d97f48260566eaeb90 freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 28f0f21be0e8bed2047899eefaff1775SHA-256: d03d3ec074f3babe3c7f3763330a8879e170b8b0b596c9302932a8bf53d8aab4 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 065ad49d500e22359039caf24bc018ceSHA-256: cc1e6be66254c7fee8856510b0ca3a3b95f05ac008298b6acabf7b9e93cc9210 freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 69f69efd265f4f43f2015262f9516f26SHA-256: b6cc0eb3ff8674e0b01834641bb70fb5daa11878f5088e0e3691a7d361a83fba freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: db9ce18d2a37b07f2882d5ac8a2c588eSHA-256: dd731a73e9374a74d8ff687ec9b97e2ae7da3240da11d061a8b0f3cb0a9a0b99 freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 4f1f259eebf9416466e1475cccb489e3SHA-256: f8b779092fab55a4998e9f5d2b3770794e0a1802eff155f70f390e769a30d57a freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.s390x.rpm     MD5: 0a592741e5dde60ae6af76025702f4a8SHA-256: 188580afdbde07c0ed96dce567469265839cb40aeccb765e7bf33368d06c8be2   x86_64: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 324cd05f4175873056337301f5db3f3cSHA-256: 927a28600dfae5f3e469397e86c4cb1d07f8aff07c61485e723c865a1ba3d28a freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 793281bdb20ce03387f32d67064467f8SHA-256: 91b7bb6fa4db6a526999075cefa33e6ec926f250ac9018dffe31322711bb513b freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: b066afb30956a2d756d1dada28987ca3SHA-256: c27eecb51018235c2953922d92b74fe179b564d69ac724a0af1914250b04475f freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 5b287335d4ffd19370f94de6e46c5c08SHA-256: 6f1113ce0bdd687ce87b031a53f7a51323ee88ccd9d0fe4fa60607143b1506b8 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a012dea189d9cd4a934af530ba72cebeSHA-256: 62bf24ca618b1570c4a542260beb765cf831a8710d913b4cfee1b23b294862db freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7de564b3f0a1c0746459b0d76f4c8196SHA-256: 8c46cbf09bf6a8c7c259c7a671018b40e8fee8fc72fe179dce3d6230666b7695 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02b8e1aba5226b78631f8a25eab07594SHA-256: 5a380b1b428df3e9be595910d134026ccfc521d0983477ee3c1d2f9cae60aaa9 freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4bf09d747577ce1dda88437b17c086eeSHA-256: 8da7c2c2f7406a0cf23a396a50b29af8793d3055681017158fa290ae24280761 freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: caf7093d2d0709de3ec9f21a4858b114SHA-256: 7617d687aa3d7b57bf0fc5ad713783431568366de91c7ca7047b2c633d0305ef freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0fd95f2575032c3583b225234ef06b1cSHA-256: 57fe0f68e18003307aa6ea14ec31175e3d71ed98f74e827d6a8569ce73816b01 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7ae05ec955cc1e33ac1b413250eafe15SHA-256: d60bce13100991ada442e837354a4991d7f37d4490f196a786057d6247ceaca2 freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: d65447e7d8d2b01847e10ecb89410dc1SHA-256: bbc0a3e3311b6799c952ae5161724af957025a0e15cdf815d16e104f24092c79 freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 3cbec77f072cc1b2217fd3a90e80a073SHA-256: 95250b415e278dbd7e4dd180d3139d188ac5ce5701f8fd4a28b2ba0ae381b7af freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: f35bb9c0457b1e07a55445c2c8f0a664SHA-256: ba5f154ce7cafd8e4074e644c73d27e2c669504bb394bcb38e490458dcc4789f freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a92a44d1daa697c379a8964dfd593983SHA-256: 945e3cdd8d9ed66857f7982c2a58a627ff607e0c4f4c926a316fcef6395f5074   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server TUS (v. 7.3) SRPMS: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: 5e96632852397a55278fe7ad2409a29fSHA-256: 59509a3a66c6f70128580d87a3bf62c2f0d6d0ab85091993db83577756c2e27b   x86_64: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 324cd05f4175873056337301f5db3f3cSHA-256: 927a28600dfae5f3e469397e86c4cb1d07f8aff07c61485e723c865a1ba3d28a freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 793281bdb20ce03387f32d67064467f8SHA-256: 91b7bb6fa4db6a526999075cefa33e6ec926f250ac9018dffe31322711bb513b freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: b066afb30956a2d756d1dada28987ca3SHA-256: c27eecb51018235c2953922d92b74fe179b564d69ac724a0af1914250b04475f freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 5b287335d4ffd19370f94de6e46c5c08SHA-256: 6f1113ce0bdd687ce87b031a53f7a51323ee88ccd9d0fe4fa60607143b1506b8 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a012dea189d9cd4a934af530ba72cebeSHA-256: 62bf24ca618b1570c4a542260beb765cf831a8710d913b4cfee1b23b294862db freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7de564b3f0a1c0746459b0d76f4c8196SHA-256: 8c46cbf09bf6a8c7c259c7a671018b40e8fee8fc72fe179dce3d6230666b7695 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02b8e1aba5226b78631f8a25eab07594SHA-256: 5a380b1b428df3e9be595910d134026ccfc521d0983477ee3c1d2f9cae60aaa9 freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4bf09d747577ce1dda88437b17c086eeSHA-256: 8da7c2c2f7406a0cf23a396a50b29af8793d3055681017158fa290ae24280761 freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: caf7093d2d0709de3ec9f21a4858b114SHA-256: 7617d687aa3d7b57bf0fc5ad713783431568366de91c7ca7047b2c633d0305ef freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0fd95f2575032c3583b225234ef06b1cSHA-256: 57fe0f68e18003307aa6ea14ec31175e3d71ed98f74e827d6a8569ce73816b01 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7ae05ec955cc1e33ac1b413250eafe15SHA-256: d60bce13100991ada442e837354a4991d7f37d4490f196a786057d6247ceaca2 freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: d65447e7d8d2b01847e10ecb89410dc1SHA-256: bbc0a3e3311b6799c952ae5161724af957025a0e15cdf815d16e104f24092c79 freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 3cbec77f072cc1b2217fd3a90e80a073SHA-256: 95250b415e278dbd7e4dd180d3139d188ac5ce5701f8fd4a28b2ba0ae381b7af freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: f35bb9c0457b1e07a55445c2c8f0a664SHA-256: ba5f154ce7cafd8e4074e644c73d27e2c669504bb394bcb38e490458dcc4789f freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a92a44d1daa697c379a8964dfd593983SHA-256: 945e3cdd8d9ed66857f7982c2a58a627ff607e0c4f4c926a316fcef6395f5074   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation (v. 7) SRPMS: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.src.rpm     MD5: 5e96632852397a55278fe7ad2409a29fSHA-256: 59509a3a66c6f70128580d87a3bf62c2f0d6d0ab85091993db83577756c2e27b   x86_64: freeradius-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 324cd05f4175873056337301f5db3f3cSHA-256: 927a28600dfae5f3e469397e86c4cb1d07f8aff07c61485e723c865a1ba3d28a freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 793281bdb20ce03387f32d67064467f8SHA-256: 91b7bb6fa4db6a526999075cefa33e6ec926f250ac9018dffe31322711bb513b freeradius-debuginfo-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: b066afb30956a2d756d1dada28987ca3SHA-256: c27eecb51018235c2953922d92b74fe179b564d69ac724a0af1914250b04475f freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.i686.rpm     MD5: 5b287335d4ffd19370f94de6e46c5c08SHA-256: 6f1113ce0bdd687ce87b031a53f7a51323ee88ccd9d0fe4fa60607143b1506b8 freeradius-devel-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a012dea189d9cd4a934af530ba72cebeSHA-256: 62bf24ca618b1570c4a542260beb765cf831a8710d913b4cfee1b23b294862db freeradius-doc-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7de564b3f0a1c0746459b0d76f4c8196SHA-256: 8c46cbf09bf6a8c7c259c7a671018b40e8fee8fc72fe179dce3d6230666b7695 freeradius-krb5-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 02b8e1aba5226b78631f8a25eab07594SHA-256: 5a380b1b428df3e9be595910d134026ccfc521d0983477ee3c1d2f9cae60aaa9 freeradius-ldap-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4bf09d747577ce1dda88437b17c086eeSHA-256: 8da7c2c2f7406a0cf23a396a50b29af8793d3055681017158fa290ae24280761 freeradius-mysql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: caf7093d2d0709de3ec9f21a4858b114SHA-256: 7617d687aa3d7b57bf0fc5ad713783431568366de91c7ca7047b2c633d0305ef freeradius-perl-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0fd95f2575032c3583b225234ef06b1cSHA-256: 57fe0f68e18003307aa6ea14ec31175e3d71ed98f74e827d6a8569ce73816b01 freeradius-postgresql-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 7ae05ec955cc1e33ac1b413250eafe15SHA-256: d60bce13100991ada442e837354a4991d7f37d4490f196a786057d6247ceaca2 freeradius-python-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: d65447e7d8d2b01847e10ecb89410dc1SHA-256: bbc0a3e3311b6799c952ae5161724af957025a0e15cdf815d16e104f24092c79 freeradius-sqlite-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 3cbec77f072cc1b2217fd3a90e80a073SHA-256: 95250b415e278dbd7e4dd180d3139d188ac5ce5701f8fd4a28b2ba0ae381b7af freeradius-unixODBC-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: f35bb9c0457b1e07a55445c2c8f0a664SHA-256: ba5f154ce7cafd8e4074e644c73d27e2c669504bb394bcb38e490458dcc4789f freeradius-utils-3.0.4-7.el7_3.x86_64.rpm     MD5: a92a44d1daa697c379a8964dfd593983SHA-256: 945e3cdd8d9ed66857f7982c2a58a627ff607e0c4f4c926a316fcef6395f5074   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:
Stunned security experts tear strips off president-elect pick hours after announcementUS president-elect Donald Trump's freshly minted cyber-tsar Rudy Giuliani runs a website with a content management system years out of date and potentially utterly hackable. Former New York City mayor and Donald loyalist Giuliani was today unveiled by Trump's transition team as the future president's cybersecurity adviser – meaning Giuliani will play a crucial role in the defense of America's computer infrastructure. Giulianisecurity.com, the website for the ex-mayor's eponymous infosec consultancy firm, is powered by a roughly five-year-old build of Joomla! that is packed with vulnerabilities.
Some of those bugs can be potentially exploited by miscreants using basic SQL injection techniques to compromise the server. This seemingly insecure system also has a surprising number of network ports open – from MySQL and anonymous LDAP to a very out-of-date OpenSSH 4.7 that was released in 2007. Security gurus are right now tearing strips off Trump's cyber-wizard pick.

Top hacker Dan Tentler was first to point out the severely out-of-date Joomla! install. "It speaks volumes," Tentler told The Register, referring to Giuliani's computer security credentials, or lack of, and fitness for the top post. "Seventy-year-old luddite autocrats who often brag about not using technology are somehow put in charge of technology: it's like setting our country on fire and giving every extranational hacker a roman candle – or, rather, not setting on fire, but dousing in gasoline." Content management system developer Michael Fienen also pulled no punches: It gets worse. "Giuliani is running a version of PHP that was released in 2013, and a version of Joomla that was released around 2012," said Ty Miller, a director at Sydney-based infosec biz Threat Intelligence. "Using the version information, within minutes we were able to identify a combined list of 41 publicly known vulnerabilities and 19 publicly available exploits.

Depending upon the configuration of the website, these exploits may or may not work, but is an indication that Giuliani's security needs to be taken up a level." Found on /r/sysadmin, presented without comment. pic.twitter.com/UmWe7tHURv — Ryan Castellucci (@ryancdotorg) January 12, 2017 The most surprising fact in all of this is that the Giuliani Security website hasn't ALREADY been hacked.

They might as well put out a sign. — Michael Fienen (@fienen) January 12, 2017 Another computer security expert, speaking to The Register on condition of anonymity, analyzed Giuliani's website for us. Our guru, based in Australia, said that while the pending cyber-tsar is likely to have outsourced management of his online base, the fact that the mayor-turned-cyber-expert didn't check for lax security on his own website is not going to instill any confidence. We have reproduced our contact's assessment in full on the next page. ® 'Someone should be taken to task for this' Well, talking nuts and bolts: that website is hosted with a hosting provider.
It looks like it has its own IP address based on having a single DNS PTR object (reverse address to the name giulianisecurity.com) which means its unlikely to be in use by other organisations (except maybe his own... who knows.) That IP address is allocated out of a block of addresses registered to Japanese giant NTT but these could also be provided to NTT’s customers such as web developers/hosting providers etc. Without actively poking at the site – which I’m terrified to do, frankly – it may be shared hosting, may be a VPS, or may be a physically separate dedicated hosting solution.
I’m betting it’s a cheap VPS-based ‘dedicated’ solution. My experience with this kind of hosting means that a nice attack vector is identifying the hosting provider and trying to get allocated a similar hosting solution in the adjacent IP address space, getting root on it (or having it if it’s a VPS) and then using ‘layer 2’ fun and games to redirect the victim site’s traffic to the attacker.

This still works amazingly well and is why smart people try to do things like statically publish layer-2 addresses for layer 3 IP gateways (although this is only so effective, really). For the giulianisecurity.com domain they seem to use Microsoft Office 365 for his email. Not a bad choice.

Email security sucks and, unless you know what you’re doing/are a glutton for punishment or are generally my kind of tinfoilhat wearer (hey, friends), it’s best to leave email security to someone reasonably credible. I also note they use a large trademark monitor company – MarkMonitor.com – for the DNS service provider for the domain name giulianisecurity.com. Which is hilarious.

Because, yeah, you’d want to intrude trademark-wise on this guy’s name because it’s such a valuable brand. Like Trump’s, you know? The reality is someone else makes these choices for him for his business.
It’s not like he’s there, updating his ancient and known vulnerable Joomla content management system himself (he’d get props from me if that were the case :) Anyone truly trying to protect your brand would avoid putting a giant red flag like an unpatched CMS in a commodity hosting environment out there. Whether it’s Giuliani’s company’s responsibility or an outsourced provider’s (very likely) the ‘having ancient Joomla’ in place is a pretty bad look.
Someone should be taken to task a bit for this.

And if you’re a security and safety company with an understanding of information security threats you’d have threat management programs in place to identify and improve your controls. For example, if you were undertaking actual security testing of your site I’d wager anyone in infosec – or in IT generally really – would’ve noticed the ancient CMS and its default install remnants using the crappiest, free-est tools out there.
So respectfully, Rudy, get someone to patch your shit and seek out some kind of specialist advice. Snarky comments aside – it really comes down to this greater concern: there’s literally millions of people in infosec who would be better cyber security advisors than Giuliani or whomever his technical advisors are that he’d call on for advice. So I’d ask – again respectfully – that the president elect cast a slightly wider net than he has to receive ‘cyber’ security advice.

As much as most people in infosec are a bunch of opinionated jerks (oh, and we are) we’re all here to help. Just ask a professional.

First sign in knowing one? It’s the person who doesn’t use the word ‘cyber’ to prefix everything they say.
An update for 389-ds-base is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact ofModerate.

A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives adetailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability from the CVElink(s) in the References section. 389 Directory Server is an LDAP version 3 (LDAPv3) compliant server.

The basepackages include the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) server andcommand-line utilities for server administration.This update fixes the following bug:* Previously, the referential integrity plug-in performed add, modify, anddelete operations more slowly than necessary.

This update fixes the bug andimproves performance of these operations significantly.(BZ#1393007)Users of 389-ds-base are advised to upgrade to these updated packages, which fixthis bug. For details on how to apply this update, which includes the changesdescribed in this advisory, refer to:https://access.redhat.com/articles/11258After installing this update, the 389 server service will be restartedautomatically.Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 6) SRPMS: 389-ds-base-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.src.rpm     MD5: 2af203e5920650570c143301c4626cc4SHA-256: 65df39f4cfde83db592a69cc163588f7b6d46f3750bbc5d96943196da48a4659   IA-32: 389-ds-base-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: 9e0c793e24156afb384b84d1525fa3a5SHA-256: c7af552eda5af9093dbc744bff38908173090f2724edf695ebf26ce12265b0e1 389-ds-base-debuginfo-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: f69d273751f346604b148ea6d552d50cSHA-256: 5fccf8b0e9de5deae4f0cef4a0d08b84d2c616fa5507a54e67f09a975635b595 389-ds-base-devel-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: 4abbac85f5cae6f8eac2029b16a19592SHA-256: f2a8b61cf02868f37d65bde0ca71dc0563db66ab410c8c9fad99f5ad4c7fa2a0 389-ds-base-libs-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: ae7998cc2cb314a6bfabfead7de7af44SHA-256: 26bade5ca135179b3010100c471b3306335d71c80f29468beb6c9ee08e86bd89   x86_64: 389-ds-base-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 73092f81bf0fe99b00b5b9e4a2508e15SHA-256: 7299834a2d27e72aff88a52ea76feb82ffc82a29e8843bf9bd358401465fffd8 389-ds-base-debuginfo-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: f69d273751f346604b148ea6d552d50cSHA-256: 5fccf8b0e9de5deae4f0cef4a0d08b84d2c616fa5507a54e67f09a975635b595 389-ds-base-debuginfo-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 8d8d6a5abe0fcf184d2ce502f5961bddSHA-256: 012313823ce1ba338ba54d5db3e9f0fb647d2106982a0f113abfdd701691c1ac 389-ds-base-devel-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: 4abbac85f5cae6f8eac2029b16a19592SHA-256: f2a8b61cf02868f37d65bde0ca71dc0563db66ab410c8c9fad99f5ad4c7fa2a0 389-ds-base-devel-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: cac59e536461a82274551b540f2aee52SHA-256: 68673eef9399ea8eb0f7d22e270283d732fc9798238d520856f9d75f932b3b55 389-ds-base-libs-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: ae7998cc2cb314a6bfabfead7de7af44SHA-256: 26bade5ca135179b3010100c471b3306335d71c80f29468beb6c9ee08e86bd89 389-ds-base-libs-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e3af3cd147d4941d3766af297188b38cSHA-256: b4c02074daf7e6970be3ca2cf15144baaaae17ff7d353b5d7afcfacb5794fcf3   Red Hat Enterprise Linux HPC Node (v. 6) SRPMS: 389-ds-base-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.src.rpm     MD5: 2af203e5920650570c143301c4626cc4SHA-256: 65df39f4cfde83db592a69cc163588f7b6d46f3750bbc5d96943196da48a4659   x86_64: 389-ds-base-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 73092f81bf0fe99b00b5b9e4a2508e15SHA-256: 7299834a2d27e72aff88a52ea76feb82ffc82a29e8843bf9bd358401465fffd8 389-ds-base-debuginfo-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: f69d273751f346604b148ea6d552d50cSHA-256: 5fccf8b0e9de5deae4f0cef4a0d08b84d2c616fa5507a54e67f09a975635b595 389-ds-base-debuginfo-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 8d8d6a5abe0fcf184d2ce502f5961bddSHA-256: 012313823ce1ba338ba54d5db3e9f0fb647d2106982a0f113abfdd701691c1ac 389-ds-base-devel-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: 4abbac85f5cae6f8eac2029b16a19592SHA-256: f2a8b61cf02868f37d65bde0ca71dc0563db66ab410c8c9fad99f5ad4c7fa2a0 389-ds-base-devel-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: cac59e536461a82274551b540f2aee52SHA-256: 68673eef9399ea8eb0f7d22e270283d732fc9798238d520856f9d75f932b3b55 389-ds-base-libs-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: ae7998cc2cb314a6bfabfead7de7af44SHA-256: 26bade5ca135179b3010100c471b3306335d71c80f29468beb6c9ee08e86bd89 389-ds-base-libs-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e3af3cd147d4941d3766af297188b38cSHA-256: b4c02074daf7e6970be3ca2cf15144baaaae17ff7d353b5d7afcfacb5794fcf3   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (v. 6) SRPMS: 389-ds-base-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.src.rpm     MD5: 2af203e5920650570c143301c4626cc4SHA-256: 65df39f4cfde83db592a69cc163588f7b6d46f3750bbc5d96943196da48a4659   IA-32: 389-ds-base-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: 9e0c793e24156afb384b84d1525fa3a5SHA-256: c7af552eda5af9093dbc744bff38908173090f2724edf695ebf26ce12265b0e1 389-ds-base-debuginfo-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: f69d273751f346604b148ea6d552d50cSHA-256: 5fccf8b0e9de5deae4f0cef4a0d08b84d2c616fa5507a54e67f09a975635b595 389-ds-base-devel-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: 4abbac85f5cae6f8eac2029b16a19592SHA-256: f2a8b61cf02868f37d65bde0ca71dc0563db66ab410c8c9fad99f5ad4c7fa2a0 389-ds-base-libs-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: ae7998cc2cb314a6bfabfead7de7af44SHA-256: 26bade5ca135179b3010100c471b3306335d71c80f29468beb6c9ee08e86bd89   x86_64: 389-ds-base-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 73092f81bf0fe99b00b5b9e4a2508e15SHA-256: 7299834a2d27e72aff88a52ea76feb82ffc82a29e8843bf9bd358401465fffd8 389-ds-base-debuginfo-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: f69d273751f346604b148ea6d552d50cSHA-256: 5fccf8b0e9de5deae4f0cef4a0d08b84d2c616fa5507a54e67f09a975635b595 389-ds-base-debuginfo-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 8d8d6a5abe0fcf184d2ce502f5961bddSHA-256: 012313823ce1ba338ba54d5db3e9f0fb647d2106982a0f113abfdd701691c1ac 389-ds-base-devel-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: 4abbac85f5cae6f8eac2029b16a19592SHA-256: f2a8b61cf02868f37d65bde0ca71dc0563db66ab410c8c9fad99f5ad4c7fa2a0 389-ds-base-devel-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: cac59e536461a82274551b540f2aee52SHA-256: 68673eef9399ea8eb0f7d22e270283d732fc9798238d520856f9d75f932b3b55 389-ds-base-libs-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: ae7998cc2cb314a6bfabfead7de7af44SHA-256: 26bade5ca135179b3010100c471b3306335d71c80f29468beb6c9ee08e86bd89 389-ds-base-libs-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e3af3cd147d4941d3766af297188b38cSHA-256: b4c02074daf7e6970be3ca2cf15144baaaae17ff7d353b5d7afcfacb5794fcf3   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation (v. 6) SRPMS: 389-ds-base-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.src.rpm     MD5: 2af203e5920650570c143301c4626cc4SHA-256: 65df39f4cfde83db592a69cc163588f7b6d46f3750bbc5d96943196da48a4659   IA-32: 389-ds-base-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: 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8d8d6a5abe0fcf184d2ce502f5961bddSHA-256: 012313823ce1ba338ba54d5db3e9f0fb647d2106982a0f113abfdd701691c1ac 389-ds-base-devel-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: 4abbac85f5cae6f8eac2029b16a19592SHA-256: f2a8b61cf02868f37d65bde0ca71dc0563db66ab410c8c9fad99f5ad4c7fa2a0 389-ds-base-devel-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: cac59e536461a82274551b540f2aee52SHA-256: 68673eef9399ea8eb0f7d22e270283d732fc9798238d520856f9d75f932b3b55 389-ds-base-libs-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.i686.rpm     MD5: ae7998cc2cb314a6bfabfead7de7af44SHA-256: 26bade5ca135179b3010100c471b3306335d71c80f29468beb6c9ee08e86bd89 389-ds-base-libs-1.2.11.15-85.el6_8.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e3af3cd147d4941d3766af297188b38cSHA-256: b4c02074daf7e6970be3ca2cf15144baaaae17ff7d353b5d7afcfacb5794fcf3   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) 1393007 - ds9 backport 47411 - Replace substring search with plain search in referint plugin These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. 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2016 sucked. 2017 won’t be much better, sorry DDoS attacks have been around since at least 2000, and they’re not going away.
In fact, as the number of devices online grows, the volume and velocity of these attacks is also increasing. Whole industries have developed around launching and preventing DDoS campaigns as black hats and white hats battle for dominance, and 2017 promises to be the most dramatic year yet in that conflict. Here are some predictions about what’s likely to happen in the next 12 months. Whale-sized attacks will increase Historically, DDoS attacks have been relatively small: the majority of attacks – 93 per cent – are below 1Gbps in size, so when large attacks do happen, they tend to show up on the radar. We’ve seen some monster attacks in 2016 – most notably the Mirai-based attack on Brian Krebs’ Krebsonsecurity site during September that caused Akamai to withdraw support, and the attack on Dyn in October. These mega-attacks, totalling 100Gbps or more, are likely to increase in both number and size.
In its Q3 State of the Internet security report, Akamai spotted a 138 per cent increase in attacks over 100Gbps. Expect to see more of these, especially as attackers become more devious. New attack techniques applying the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP could amplify DDoS attacks by 55 times, which could send already-mounting attack volumes into overdrive. Not only are we likely to see more mega-attacks, but the largest ones will push the envelope in size terms. The IoT will become a bigger factor in DDoS Expect to see the Internet of Things (IoT) play an important part in these attacks. Mirai, which warped DVRs into evil, traffic-spitting monsters, has already wreaked havoc in Liberia and across much of the rest of the web.

And the software wasn’t even very good. Forrester Research predicts that IoT compromises will escalate a notch in 2017, arguing that 500,000 IoT devices will suffer from a single compromise, dwarfing the Heartbleed bug of 2014. The number of connected devices is going to increase greatly over the next few years, IDC estimates.
It’s time for IoT equipment suppliers to sort out their device security, warned Kevin Lonergan, who heads up security research at IDC Canada. “Attackers can easily gain access to these devices via unchanged default passwords and vulnerabilities in outdated firmware,” he said. “This problem is only going to get worse as connectivity is added to traditionally unconnected devices such as home appliances, cars, etc., by vendors who have little experience with creating secure code.” Making consumers change their default configuration before an IoT device will actually work might be a good idea.

The problem is that someone would have to regulate it, because vendors will be loath to do anything that introduces friction and increases customer support costs. DDoS will overshadow ransomware attacks As the volume of DDoS attacks increases, demand for mitigation services will increase exponentially. Nick Galletto, leader of Deloitte’s Canadian Technology Risk practice, believes that DDoS will take over from ransomware as a dominant risk to organizations worldwide. “Even before the recent [mega-]attacks, we saw that many of our clients were experiencing some level of attacks that mostly flooded their network environment,” he said.

The causes were multi-faceted, he said, adding that hacktivism played a part.

Disgruntled employees were also found to have hired DDoS attack services in some cases, Galletto added. Sub-saturating attacks will create a security vector DDoS may take over from ransomware as a cause for concern, but it’s also worth pointing out that one may act as a diversion for the other.

There’s a reason that the lion’s share of attacks operate on a relatively small (sub-saturating) scale: they could be distracting their targets while attackers compromise their systems.

This has happened before.
In 2015, attackers allegedly used a DDoS attack as a smokescreen to pilfer the personal details of 2.4 million customers. Larger DDoS attacks often show up as a network accessibility problem, but companies will increasingly find themselves experiencing them as a security issue.

These "dark DDoS" attacks are typically hard to detect, so companies will need to ensure that they have proper visibility over their network traffic to tease out attacks that could be an attempt to cloak something more insidious. Extortion via DDoS on the rise DDoS attackers are increasingly targeting companies for financial gain.

Expect to see more DDoS threats in which attackers hold companies to ransom, warn experts.

The DDoS mitigation firm Corero surveyed more than 100 IT professionals at the InfoSecurity Europe show in summer 2016, and found that eight in ten people expected their company to be on the sharp end of a DDoS extortion. Perhaps even more worrying is the news that 43 per cent of firms said they’d consider paying such a demand to keep their websites up and running. These extortion attacks come from a variety of sources.

The Amanda Collective was threatening companies as early as March 2016 (although its capabilities have been called into question). DD4BC, which also uses bitcoin as the payment currency for its DDoS blackmail campaigns, has drawn the attention of Interpol. DDoS-for-hire services will gain traction DDoS attack toolkits have been around for years, as have services that will enable you to pay for an attack.

Expect to see more of them. Why? Firstly, because they can be offered incredibly cheaply, and secondly, because there are still huge amounts of money to be made. Often offered as ‘stressors’ – sites used to stress-test targets legitimately – DDoS-for- hire services don’t ask too many questions about whether a ‘tester’ has permission to target a site. Others openly offer DDoS services. Stressors have been spotted in the wild offering these services for $5 an hour.
In spite of the low fees, DDoSas-a-service providers can make a pretty packet. When the British teeanager Adam Mudd was collared for offering such a service in November, he was said have made $385,000 from 1.7 million attacks against 1.7 million addresses. DDoS-for-hire is going to ramp up.

The IoT botnets, combined with an easy money-making opportunity, will bring more of this kind of thing in 2017.
Sceptical? Well, there’s already a 400,000 strong IoT zombie army for rent, using the Mirai malware. Some of these developments are brand new, while others chart future trends from current trajectories. One thing seems likely: if you think that DDoS activity made for a crummy, stressful 2016, then you’d better strap yourself in for the coming year. Sponsored: Want to know more about PAM? Visit The Register's hub
New release of CA Identity Suite provides pre-configured policy templates to help organizations manage and deploy secure identity services. CA Technologies announced an update to its CA Identity Suite on November 30, providing enterprises with new deployment, integration and security capabilities.

The new CA Identity Suite version 14 release benefits from recent acquisitions made by CA."You need to have a model for how to ensure the appropriate access regardless of where the using is coming from or where the resources are located," Nick Nikols, SVP and Cybersecurity Business CTO at CA Technologies, told eWEEK. "Identity isn't about who you are, it's about what you do."Nikols explained that the CA Identity Suite provides capabilities for access governance as well as enforcement features. He added that a goal of the new release is to simplify access governance with a user interface that is easier for business decision makers to use."We have also simplified how fast the CA Identity Suite can be be deployed," Nikols said. In the past, Nikols noted that prior versions of Identity Suite would often involve the use of professional services with consulting in order to facilitate deployment. Nikols said that now, with the new release, even a high-availability configuration can be deployed rapidly.

At the Gartner IAM (Identity and Access Management) conference on December 1, Nikols said that CA demonstrated on-stage how it was able to deliver a two-server deployment of Identity Suite within eight minutes. Once the identity suite is deployed on servers, there is still a need for policy configuration, which is where another new enhancement comes in. Nikols explained that with the new Identity Suite release, there are now pre-packaged policy configurations for the most common use-cases. Policy configurations can now also be shared within an organization or community."We've turned the roll-out of Identity Suite from being a custom bespoke engagement which was time consuming, to something that can be deployed quickly and operational in short order," Nikols said.Some of the new capabilities in the updated Identity Suite benefit from recent CA Technologies acquisitions.

Among those acquisitions was one on June 8, 2015 of privately-held intelligent identity manager IdMlogic. Nikols said that some of the capabilities in the new release, including the ability to deliver the Identity Suite as a virtual appliance, were gained from IdMlogic.The issue of maintaining a secure identity in a modern distributed enterprise is a non-trivial task.
In addition to Microsoft's Active Directory which is widely used, Nikol noted that there are many identity repositories that are being used including other enterprise Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) directories. He added that applications generally maintain their own identity repositories and authorization models."Federation facilitates the single sign on between these environments, but it has done little to simplify the management of all these copies of identities in each of these repositories," Nikols said. "CA Identity Suite is focused on orchestrating the management of all of these copies—making sure that their state is current and accurate, and that the proper entitlement settings are maintained within each of the applications' own authorization models.""This makes it possible to have consistent information as well as authorization behavior established and maintained across these distributed environments," he said.Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at eWEEK and InternetNews.com.

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