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Innovative Pay Later Application Opens Mobile Credit Services for Financially-Excluded, Prepaid SubscribersSAN FRANCISCO, September 13th, 2017 – Juvo, the pioneer in mobile Identity Scoring, today announced its partnership with Tune Talk, the fastest growing Mobile Virtual Network Operator (MVNO) in Malaysia.

The deployment, Juvorsquo;s first in Malaysia, will drive financial inclusion across a population that has rapidly adopted smartphones in a highly saturated market.‘Pay Laterrsquo;, created by Juvo and fueled by Juvorsquo;s Identity Scoring, is... Source: RealWire
In the beginning of 2017, Kaspersky Lab became aware of new activities by an APT actor we have been tracking for several years called Spring Dragon (also known as LotusBlossom).
Information about the new attacks arrived from a research partner in Taiwan and we decided to review the actorrsquo;s tools, techniques and activities.
Asia-Pacific contributed more than 50 percent of total botnet detections in the second half of 2016, with the Philippines, Indonesia, India, Thailand, and Malaysia among top 10 countries.
Barra leaves Xiaomi to "lead the Oculus team" and other VR efforts at Facebook.
Enlarge / President Donald Trump signs an executive order Monday withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership as Chief of Staff Reince Priebus looks on in the Oval Office.Saul Loeb/Getty Images reader comments 249 Share this story With the stroke of a pen from President Donald Trump, the United States officially withdrew Monday from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a proposed and controversial 12-nation trade pact dealing with everything from intellectual property to human rights. "Everybody knows what that means, right? We’ve been talking about this for a long time," Trump said as he signed the order and made good on his campaign promise to remove the US from the trade deal. "A great thing for the American worker." During the election campaign, he called the TPP a "disaster." President Barack Obama had praised the pact, but it was put on life support just days after Election Day.

That's when congressional leaders told the White House that it would no longer consider entering the pact with a lame-duck president.

The failing deal was of interest to Ars due to how intellectual property would have been treated.

As we noted, "the TPP exported US copyright law regarding how long a copyright lasts.

For signing nations, the plan would have made copyrights last for the life of the creator plus 70 years after his or her death.

That's basically the same as in the US." The nations remaining in the sputtering pact include Japan, Australia, Peru, Malaysia, Vietnam, New Zealand, Chile, Singapore, Canada, Mexico, and Brunei.

China has proposed a 16-nation free-trade bloc that includes India.

The Trump administration is expected to begin trade negotiations with each TPP nation separately. The Motion Picture Association of America had hailed the TPP when the 2,000-page text of the pact was released in 2015, after negotiations were carried out in secret. "The TPP reaffirms what we have long understood—that strengthening copyright is integral to America’s creative community and to facilitating legitimate international commerce," Chris Dodd, the MPAA chairman, said at the time.
Bamberg and Hong Kong – December 15, 2016 – Computop, a leading payment service provider, and AsiaPay, one of Asia-Pacific’s most distinguished payment service providers, today announced their new strategic partnership.

The relationship enables retailers to securely process payments in Asia-Pacific through Computop’s Paygate payment gateway using the payment methods that consumers in the region prefer and trust, helping to positively impact sales and the overall customer experience.A recent e-Marketer report noted that Asia-Pacific will remain the world’s largest retail e-commerce market, with sales expected to top $1 trillion in 2016 and more than double to $2.725 trillion by 2020.

Findings also noted that the region will see the fastest rise in retail e-commerce sales, increasing 31.5% this year.
In addition, according to a study by Kantar TNS, Asia-Pacific is leading the world in mobile payment with over half (53%) of connected consumers using their mobile phones to pay for goods or services at the point-of-sale via apps.

As such, the Computop and AsiaPay partnership enables retailers to capitalize on the growth opportunity that Asia-Pacific presents. “Expanding business into foreign markets may seem daunting, but working with companies that have a strong foothold in those regions and that understand the payment behaviors and preferences of consumers in those countries is key to retailer success,” said Ralf Gladis, CEO of Computop. “Through our partnership with AsiaPay, Computop is able to provide merchant customers with the opportunity to take advantage of Asia-Pacific consumers’ appetite for e-commerce. With Computop Paygate integrated with AsiaPay, retailers benefit from the secure payment options that southeast Asian consumers expect and trust.” “We are very honoured to be a strategic partner of Computop,” said Joseph Chan, CEO of AsiaPay. “Our company has more than 16 years of experience in credit card processing and international business service, giving us a solid position as a premier e-Payment player in the region.

Furthermore, we have a keen understanding of merchants’ payment requirements in the fast-paced e-commerce business environment. We believe that a strategic cooperation with Computop can help merchants improve their processing efficiency, thereby contributing to their business growth as well as support their global endeavor,” he added. Founded in 2000, AsiaPay offers secure and cost-effective electronic payment processing solutions and services to banks and e-businesses globally.

The company offers a variety of card payments, online bank transfers, e- wallets and cash payments across over 16 countries, including Hong Kong, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.
It is a certified international 3-D secure vendor for VISA, MasterCard, American Express and JCB. Computop Paygate is a PCI-certified omnichannel payment platform that provides retailers with secure payment solutions and efficient fraud prevention for international markets.

Computop integrated AsiaPay into Paygate to offer merchants a wide range of payment methods in the Asia-Pacific region to support their cross-border and global commerce efforts. Payment methods available on Paygate include Alipay, American Express, JCB, Tenpay and WeChat, along with many other widely-accepted payment options that consumers in these countries use. About ComputopComputop is a leading global payment service provider (PSP) that provides compliant and secure solutions in the fields of e-commerce, POS, m-commerce and Mail Order and Telephone Order (MOTO).

The company, founded in 1997, is headquartered in Bamberg, Germany, with additional independent offices in China, the UK and the U.S.

Computop processes transactions totalling $24 billion per year for its client network of over 14,000 mid-size and large international merchants and global marketplace partners in industries such as retail, travel and gaming.

Global customers include C&A, Fossil, Metro Cash & Carry, Rakuten, Samsung and Swarovski.

Following the recent asset deal with the Otto Group, Computop is now processing payments for merchants that previously used EOS Payment, including all 100 Otto retail brands.
In cooperation with its network of financial and technology partners, which it has expanded over many years, Computop offers a comprehensive multichannel solution that is geared to the needs of today's market and provides merchants with seamlessly integrated payment processes. For further information, please visit www.computop.com. About AsiaPayFounded in 2000, AsiaPay, a premier electronic payment solution and technology vendor and payment service provider, strives to bring advanced, secure, integrated and cost-effective electronic payment processing solutions and services to banks, corporate and e-Businesses in the worldwide market, covering international credit card, China UnionPay (CUP) card, debit card and other prepaid card payments. AsiaPay is an accredited payment processor and payment gateway solution vendor for banks, certified IPSP for merchants, certified international 3-D Secure vendor for Visa, MasterCard, American Express and JCB.

AsiaPay offers its variety of award-winning payment solutions that are multi-currency, multi-lingual, multi-card and multi-channel, together with its advanced fraud detection and management solutions. Headquartered in Hong Kong, AsiaPay offers its professional e-Payment solution consultancy and quality local service support across its other 12 offices in Asia including: Thailand, Philippines, Singapore, Malaysia, Mainland China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Indonesia and India.

For more information, please visit www.asiapay.com and www.paydollar.com. ### For further information, please contact:Jessica MularczykAscendant Communications, for Computop in the U.S.Tel: 508-498-9300E-mail: jmularczyk@ascendcomms.net Charlotte HansonAscendant Communications, for Computop in the UKTel: +44 (0) 208 334 8041E-mail: chanson@ascendcomms.net Valerie SanchezSenior Channel ManagerAsiaPayTel: (632) 887-2288E-mail: valerie.sanchez@asiapay.com Alvin ChanAssociate Director, Sales & MarketingAsiaPayTel: +852-2538 8278E-mail: alvin.chan@asiapay.com

The remote hack works from anywhere in the world, robbing banks in as little as 10 minutes.

It is every consumer's dream to find an ATM spitting out cash like a winning slot machine, and it seems that hackers in Eastern Europe have figured out how to make that a reality.

As outlined by Russian security firm Group IB, the hackers are linked to the Buhtrap crew, which stole $28 billion from Russian banks between August 2015 and January 2016, according to Reuters. But while Buhtrap looted ATMs via fraudulent wire transfers, the ATM scammers reportedly use a less hands-on method: "touchless jackpotting."

The remote hack works from anywhere in the world, robbing banks in as little as 10 minutes. The hackers reportedly use a penetration testing tool known as Cobalt Strike, which lets them access servers that control ATMs via bank PCs infected by malicious emails. Accomplices then wait by the targeted ATMs and scoop up the cash as it spits out of the machine.

The hackers reportedly hit financial institutions in Armenia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Estonia, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Moldova, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Russia, Spain, and the UK. Group IB did not reveal which banks were targeted.

Global ATM manufacturers Diebold Nixdorf and NCR confirmed to PCMag that they are "familiar" with these types of breaches.

"ATM attacks are becoming more complex and sophisticated as hackers dedicate more time to attacking infrastructure," an NCR spokeswoman said in a statement. "Securing one's infrastructure and endpoints is a never-ending and extremely important task that does not depend on the region or attack type."

Diebold Nixdorf, meanwhile, claims there is "no indication to us that this group of fraudsters is active in Europe or the Americas."

But that doesn't mean they won't be. "Logical attacks on ATMs are expected to become one of the key threats targeting banks," according to Dmitry Volkov, head of the Group IB investigation department.

"They enable cybercriminals to commit fraud remotely from anywhere globally and attack the whole ATM network without being 'on the radar' of security services," he said in a statement. "This type of attack does not require development of expensive advanced software—a significant amount of the tools used are widely available on the deep Web."

As the Wall Street Journal reports, the FBI recently warned US banks to look out for potential attacks, following incidents in Taiwan and Thailand over the summer.

"Every bank is under threat of logical attacks on ATMs and should be protected accordingly," Volkov added.

New cell created after arrest and extradition of two Nigerians from Malaysia in alleged phishing attacks on US. The Atlanta US Attorney’s Office has announced the creation of a cybercrime unit within its criminal division following extradition to the US of two Nigerians from Kuala Lumpur in a phishing scam case.

A Department of Justice (DoJ) release from the Northern District of Georgia said the role of this unit is to fight growing cybercrime in the country and protect national interests. This unit, which will operate within the office’s Financial Fraud & Cyber Crime Section, will have five federal prosecutors to assist national agencies in investigating computer hacking and intrusions, distributed denial of service and malware attacks, identity theft, and other cybercrimes worldwide. According to U.S.

Attorney John Horn, the unit will “aggressively identify and investigate the newest directions in cybercrime whether committed by individuals, syndicates, or even state actors here or abroad.” The arrested Nigerians and their co-conspirators allegedly launched phishing attacks from Kuala Lumpur on more than 25 US educational institutions and stole over $1 million. Read the DoJ release here. Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events.

For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article.
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A handful of protesters rally in Sydney, Australia, in 2014 as government officials and private industry negotiated the Trans-Pacific Partnership accord.SumOfUs reader comments 14 Share this story The Trans-Pacific Partnership, a proposed and controversial 12-nation trade pact dealing with everything from intellectual property to human rights, effectively died Friday.

Congressional leaders from both parties told the White House they would no longer consider it with a lame duck president, even one who staunchly backed the plan. Among the reasons the deal was relevant to Ars readers is because of how it treated intellectual property.

The TPP exported US copyright law regarding how long a copyright lasts.

For signing nations, the plan would have made copyrights last for the life of the creator plus 70 years after his or her death.

That's basically the same as in the US. When the 2,000-page text of the deal was released in November last year—after negotiations were done in secret—the Motion Picture Association of America hailed it. "The TPP reaffirms what we have long understood—that strengthening copyright is integral to America’s creative community and to facilitating legitimate international commerce," Chris Dodd, the MPAA chairman, said. At one point last year, many feared the TPP would require signing companies to mandate that Internet service providers terminate accounts for Internet copyright scofflaws.

That, however, never materialized.
In the US, many of the top ISPs have a six-strikes consumer infringement program. Knowledge Ecology International, which monitors international law, said the measure would have gutted provisions in American law encouraging more transparency of patents on biologic drugs.

The group said infringing any patent or copyright could have become more risky and costly. But what a difference a year makes.

Following the victory of Republican Donald Trump, the Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican of Kentucky, and Sen.

Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat, have said they would not bring up the TPP vote given that President Barack Obama is leaving office in January. "In terms of the TPP agreement itself, Leader McConnell has spoken to that, and it’s something that he’s going to work with the president-elect to figure out where they go in terms of trade agreements in the future," Wally Adeyemo, Deputy National Security Advisor for International Economic Affairs told The Wall Street Journal late Friday. The nations in the accord include the US, Japan, Australia, Peru, Malaysia, Vietnam, New Zealand, Chile, Singapore, Canada, Mexico, and Brunei.

They represent about 40 percent of the global economy.

China has proposed a 16-nation free-trade bloc that includes India.
Enlarge / WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange prepares to speak from the balcony of the Ecuadorian embassy on February 5, 2016 in London, England.

Today, he can't get online.Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images reader comments 83 Share this story WikiLeaks announced via its Twitter account this morning that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's Internet connection had been cut off, blaming a "state party" for the outage.

Assange, who has been ensconced in the Ecuadorian embassy in London since he sought asylum there over four years ago to avoid extradition, has been "detained in absentia" by the Swedish government for questioning on allegations of rape. Other lesser allegations have been dropped because they have passed the time allowed by Sweden's statute of limitations. The announcement comes after the postponement of an interview of Assange by Swedish authorities at the Ecuadorian embassy by Ecuador's Attorney General's office.

The interview, which was to take place today, was pushed back by Ecuador until November 17 "to make it possible for Assange's lawyer to attend." WikiLeaks also announced that it had "activated the appropriate contingency plans" in response to the communication outage.

That plan may be related to other posts made from the WikiLeaks account overnight referring to three "precommitments"—one regarding the UK's Foreign & Commonwealth Office (UK FOS), one labeled "John Kerry," and one labeled "Ecuador." The posts included long alphanumeric strings that may have been encryption keys for files already prepositioned on the Internet. "Precommitment" is a term often associated with the concept of a "dead man's switch"—an automated response to an attack that would otherwise leave the target unable to respond, usually intended as a deterrent. It's possible that Assange made arrangements for a "dead man's switch" release of content about the UK Foreign Office, Ecuador and Secretary of State John Kerry that were intended to prevent them from taking action against him at the embassy.
If the code associated with the three "precommitments" are in fact cryptographic keys, then that "dead man's switch" has been activated by Wikileaks. In addition to the recent leaks of e-mails from the Gmail account of John Podesta, a high-ranking official within Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign, and the publishing of files obtained from the Democratic National Committee breach, WikiLeaks has issued "bounties" for leaks from the UK's Labour Party leadership.

Both leaks have been alleged by US officials to have been executed at the direction of the Russian government. Enlarge / "Precommitment" posts from WikiLeaks. Coincidentally, the Russian government-funded news organization RT, operated by TV-Novosti, published a report that RT's accounts in the United Kingdom had been "blocked." That report included a redacted image of a letter from Royal Bank of Scotland unit NatWest stating, "We have recently undertaken a review of your banking arrangements with us and reached the conclusion that we will no longer provide these facilities. You will therefore need to make banking arrangements outside of the The Royal Bank if Scotland Group." The letter said that accounts would be shut down by December. RT has broadcast a show by Assange in the past and has faced sanctions for violation of UK and European broadcast standards, particularly for its coverage of the shoot-down of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17. Ars will update this story as more details become available.
State threat actors are a reality for today's scribes Journalists investigating the downing of the MH17 flight over eastern Ukraine in 2014 have been hacked by Russia, according to security intelligence outfit ThreatConnect. The Joint Investigation Team (JIT) recently announced that Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was shot down over Eastern Ukraine in July 2014 by a missile transported from Russia. Investigative journalism group Bellingcat, whose reports were consulted by the JIT during the investigation, were targeted in a series of sophisticated hacks. These assaults included spearphishing, credential harvesting, SMS spoofing and more, as explained in a blog post by ThreatConnect (extract below). [Bellingcat founder Eliot] Higgins shared data with ThreatConnect that indicates Bellingcat has come under sustained targeting by Russian threat actors, which allowed us to identify a 2015 spearphishing campaign that is consistent with FANCY BEAR’s tactics, techniques, and procedures. We also analyzed a February 2016 attack by CyberBerkut – a group claiming to be pro-Russian Ukrainian hacktivists but also a suspected front for Moscow – against Russia-based Bellingcat contributor Ruslan Leviev, where CyberBerkut defaced the Bellingcat website and leaked Leviev’s personal details. ThreatConnect’s research shows a “similarity in the attack patterns to those adopted by Russia” against other targets to those slung against Bellingcat. “Organisations which negatively impact Russia’s image can expect cyber operations intended to retaliate or maliciously affect them,” ThreatConnect notes, adding that the assault is “symptomatic of a wider trend of state actors attempting to hack and disrupt private enterprises” such as the recent hacks against the World Anti-Doping Agency. Previous research by Trend Micro fingered Russian hackers as prime suspects in the attempted theft of sensitive data from the team investigating the downed Malaysia Airlines MH17 flight. ®
Cross-border Kosovan cuffing leads to long stretch inside A student who hacked into corporate servers to build a kill list for medieval terror bastards Daesh has been sentenced to 20 years in prison after admitting his guilt. Ardit Ferizi, aka Th3Dir3ctorY, broke into the servers of an unnamed Illinois company and downloaded the personal information of tens of thousands of its customers. He then identified over 1,300 customers with a .mil or .gov email address and posted the list to his Daesh contact, who put it online with the following warning: "We are in your emails and computer systems, watching and recording your every move, we have your names and addresses, we are in your emails and social media accounts, we are extracting confidential data and passing on your personal information to the soldiers of the khilafah, who soon with the permission of Allah will strike at your necks in your own lands!" According to court documents [PDF] Ferizi, a 20-year-old computer science student, first got involved with Daesh in April 2015 after he volunteered to administrate the now-defunct Penvid.com – a propaganda site for the terror group. After the website was shut down, Ferizi had public Twitter conversations with people online defending the actions of Daesh, saying the group's members "never kill someone without reason." He also got in contact with a now-deceased ISIL recruiter, Junaid Hussain, to discuss helping further. On June 13, 2015 Ferizi hacked into the American firm's database and gained full administrator privileges. After identifying those who he thought were legitimate targets, he forwarded the list to Hussain, who published it in August of that year. Ferizi was arrested last year in Malaysia as he was attempting to leave the country after an international warrant was issued in the US, and was extradited in January to face charges in the US. In June he pled guilty to charges of accessing a protected computer and obtaining information to provide material support to Daesh, and on Friday was sentenced to 20 years in prison. "This case represents the first time we have seen the very real and dangerous national security cyber threat that results from the combination of terrorism and hacking," said assistant attorney general John Carlin. "This successful prosecution also sends a message to those around the world that if you provide material support to designated foreign terrorist organizations and assist them with their deadly attack planning, you will have nowhere to hide. We will reach half-way around the world if necessary to hold accountable those who engage in this type of activity." ®