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Atlantic faces the rare prospect of two active tropical storms in...

Two active tropical storms at the same time in June? Happened just three times.

As hurricane season begins, NOAA told to slow its transition to...

NOAA could become a second- or third-tier weather forecasting enterprise.

Tokyo 42 review: A beautiful isometric action game that misses the...

Visually stunning but wholly underwhelming, Tokyo 42 fails to exploit its inventive premise.

Is “I forget” a valid defense when court orders demand a...

This week, a judge considers possible jail for alleged extortionists who pled the Fifth.

Forgot about Mahout? It’s back, and worth your attention

My tough life required me to fly to Miami and attend ApacheCon.
I happened across a talk by Trevor Grant, an open source technical evangelist for the financial services sector, on Mahout.
I thought, “Wait, isnrsquo;t Mahout dead?” Apparently not.
In fact, Mahout is very much alive, nothing like what you once knew of it, and now running on GPUs.Mahout was the original machine learning framework for Hadoop. When MapReduce was the thing, Mahout was the vaunted elephant rider.

But then, as Grant recalls, “Mahout 0.09 released and all the Hadoop vendors froze at 0.09+.
It was 0.09 with some bug patches. No one ever bumped up to 0.10.”[ Roundup: TensorFlow, Spark MLlib, Scikit-learn, MXNet, Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit, and Caffe machine learning and deep learning frameworks. | Get a digest of the dayrsquo;s top tech stories in the InfoWorld Daily newsletter. ]Nonetheless, the Mahout project is still active. “A lot of the projects have people paid to work on them, but Mahout doesnrsquo;t. Wersquo;re like a bunch of gypsies that wander around in companies like the MapReduces of the world,” Grant says. “All the Mahout and former Mahout people are in very, very high places in Fortune 500 companies or CTOs of startups, but we donrsquo;t have a company of our own. Lucidworks is the closest thing.
I didnrsquo;t realize but there are a lot of Mahout committers and PMCs [project management committees] kind of lurking about at Lucidworks.” (Full disclosure: I didnrsquo;t realize this either, even though I work for Lucidworks. —AO.)To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Judge: Miami reality TV star must unlock her iPhone in extortion...

"For me, this is like turning over a key to a safety box."

Miami sextortion case asks if a suspect be forced to decrypt...

Does the Fifth Amendment mean you don't have to hand over your password?

Threatpost News Wrap, April 14, 2017

Mike Mimoso, Tom Spring, and Chris Brook recap Infiltrate Con in Miami last week, and Kaspersky Lab's Security Analyst Summit in St. Maarten

The North Atlantic may get is first-ever named storm in March...

Oceans in the northern hemisphere are supposed to still be cold from the winter

Google Fiber makes expansion plans for $60 wireless gigabit service

As Google Fiber scales back fiber builds, signs point to wireless expansion.

FDA confirms toxicity of homeopathic baby products; Maker refuses to recall

The agency confirms elevated levels of belladonna, aka deadly nightshade.

Crims shut off Ukraine power in wide-ranging anniversary hacks

Phishing, denial of service, and remote exploitation part of hacking banquet Hackers of unknown origin cut power supplies in Ukraine for a second time in 12 months as part of wide-ranging attacks that hit the country in December. The attacks were revealed at the S4x17 conference in Miami in which Honeywell security researcher Marina Krotofil offered reporters some detail into the exploitation that began 16 December and raged for four days. She told Dark Reading attackers triggered an hour-long power black out at midnight 17 December by infecting the Pivnichna remote power transmission facility, knocking out remote terminal units and the connected circuit breakers. Further attacks against the State Administration of Railway Transport left Ukrainians unable to purchase rail tickets and delayed payments when the Treasury and Pension Fund was compromised. It was the second network-centric attack to knock out power supply in Ukraine.

Attackers of suspected Russian origin targeted facilities in December 2015. Those 23 December outages affected Ukraine's Prykarpattya Oblenergo and Kyivoblenergo utilities cutting power to some 80,000 customers for six hours. Last month's attacks also used the BlackEnergy and KillDisk malware. Other hacks included highly-convincing and successful phishing attacks against an unnamed Ukrainian bank, various remote exploitation, and denial of service attacks. @Marmusha talks about the recent cyber-attack in Ukraine #S4x17 pic.twitter.com/wg6IUqn3Lz — Parnian (@Parnian_7) January 10, 2017 The phishing attack on 14 July last year used the ancient trick of malicious Word document macros but wrapped it in high levels of obfuscation and anti-forensics. Information Systems Security Partners head of research Oleksii Yasynskyi, who worked on dissecting the hacks, reckoned the attackers were a mix of groups specialising in different aspects of offensive security, from infrastructure to obfuscation and payload delivery. Phishing emails numbered in the thousands. Hackers kept quiet observation for months whenever one payload was successful at breaching one of the Ukrainan assets, Krotofil told MotherBoard Yet the attackers' origin was not disclosed, if it is known; Kiev laid blame squarely on Russia for the similar 2015 utility hacking. Krotofil told Dark Reading the Ukraine's utilities may be seen as a test bed for attacks elsewhere, something she says is common with Russian hackers. Alex Mathews, security evangelist lead with Russian SCADA and industrial control system outfit Positive Technologies told El Reg says vulnerabilities in critical infrastructure are easy to find and difficult to get fixed. “It takes just two days to find a new SCADA flaw, yet almost a year to get it fixed," Mathews says. "The vulnerability of our critical infrastructure is evident. "Those charged with protecting industrial control system and SCADA networks must acknowledge that they’re exposed to cyber threats and take steps to reduce the risk." ® Bootnote While concerns the attacks are a test bed for further control system hacking in other countries, compromising such infrastructure cannot be done by cookie cutter hackers. Control systems are highly specialised with proprietary and often undocumented protocols that are not ordinarily understood outside of specialist fields. Using Ukraine as a means to hack US energy companies for example is further troubled by the variance in security controls that may exist in front of and around control systems. ® Sponsored: Flash enters the mainstream.
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