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Uber will own 37% of the combined entity, which will operate in 127 cities.
CEO: “This story is BS brewed on political agenda.”
Lawmaker proposes ban on DoD use of Moscow-based security vendor's products.
Analysis of deadly heatwaves shows how many more people theyrsquo;ll affect by 2100.
CAMBRIDGE, United Kingdom, and Moscow, Russia, 13th June 2017: UltraSoC has boosted its presence in Russia by engaging Nautech as its technical sales representative. Nautechrsquo;s expert and experienced technical and commercial team will help customers deploy UltraSoCrsquo;s embedded monitoring and analytics technology in system-on-chip (SoC) products, enabling powerful security, safety and performance enhancement features, while simultaneously cutting development time and hence reducing costs.UltraSoC is the leading provider of semiconductor IP for embedded analytics and monitoring,... Source: RealWire
Although the first quarter of 2017 was rather quiet compared to the previous reporting period, there were a few interesting developments.

Despite the growing popularity of IoT botnets, Windows-based bots accounted for 59.81% of all attacks. Meanwhile, complex attacks that can only be repelled with sophisticated protection mechanisms are becoming more frequent.
In pursuit of a high cyberthreat detection rate, the some developers of cybersecurity solutions neglect the subject matter of false positives, and unfairly so. Regretfully, only then does the idea dawn on these developers that high-quality protection from cyberthreats involves not only prevention but also a low false-positive rate.
It's almost four years since Edward Snowden leaked U.S. National Security Agency documents revealing the extent of the organization's surveillance of global internet traffic, but he's still making the headlines in Germany.At the Cebit trade show in Hannover, Germany, he'll be looking back at that period in live video interview from Moscow on Tuesday evening.[ Safeguard your data! The tools you need to encrypt your communications and web data. • Maximum-security essential tools for everyday encryption. • InfoWorld's encryption Deep Dive how-to report. | Discover how to secure your systems with InfoWorld's Security Report newsletter. ]There have been a lot of changes on the internet in those four years, but one of the biggest is the growth in the use of encryption.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Meaner strain of Shamoon makes comeback, joined by new, never-before disk wiper.
Apple’s iCloud appears to have been holding on to users’ deleted internet browsing histories, including records over a year old.Moscow-based forensics firm Elcomsoft noticed it was able to pull supposedly deleted Safari browser histories from iCloud accounts, such as the date and time the site was visited and when the record was deleted.[ The cloud storage security gap — and how to close it. | 5 ways Microsoft has improved SharePoint security. ]“In fact, we were able to access records dated more than one year back,” wrote Elcomsoft’s CEO Vladimir Katalov in a Thursday blog post.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Once the province of nation-sponsored hackers, in-memory malware goes mainstream.
Security firm says the case doesn't affect its computer incidents investigation operations. Kaspersky Lab confirmed today that one of its top cybersecurity investigators was arrested in December in Russia, reportedly amid charges of treason. News of the arrest of Ruslan Stoyanov, head of Kaspersky Lab's computer incidents investigations unit, as well as Sergei Mikhailov, deputy head of the information security department at the FSB, first came via Kommersant, a Russian economic newspaper, and word later spread to US news media outlets. Stoyanov, who had been with Kaspersky Lab since 2012, led the firm's cybercrime investigation that ultimately led to the 2016 arrests of 50 members of the so-called Lurk cybercrime gang that stole more than $45 million from Russian financial institutions.

The case was said to be Russia's largest-ever crackdown on financial cybercrime. Stoyanov's arrest sent a chill throughout the security research community, with speculation by some that his cybercrime investigative efforts may have somehow gotten a little too close to Russian nation-state hacking efforts. Russian hacking has been in the spotlight since the US intelligence community published an unclassified report that concludes Russia - under the direction of Vladmir Putin - attempted to influence the US presidential election via hacks and leaks of data from the Democratic National Committee and Clinton campaign manager John Podesta. According to Kaspersky Lab, the nature of Stoyanov's arrest predates his employment with the security firm. "The case against this employee does not involve Kaspersky Lab.

The employee, who is Head of the Computer Incidents Investigation Team, is under investigation for a period predating his employment at Kaspersky Lab," the company said in a statement. Stoyanov, a former head of network security for Russian ISP OJSC RTComm.RU, also was with Ministry Of Interior's Moscow-based Cyber Crime Unit in the early 2000s. Security experts say his arrest underscores the sometimes-blurred lines between Russian cybercrime gangs and cyber espionage activity. "I think he flew too close to the sun as his recent investigations more than likely unearthed elements of the Pawn Storm campaign," says Tom Kellermann, CEO fo Strategic Cyber Ventures. "This is a red flag to all security vendors who expose the nexus between the cybercriminal conspiracies and the Russian cyberespionage campaigns." Pawn Storm, aka Fancy Bear and APT 28, was one of the Russian state hacking groups implicated in election-related hacks against the US. Researcher Business As Usual While Kaspersky Lab said it had no information of the "details of the investigation" of Stoyanov and that no official information had been released by the Russian government on the case, the company also maintained that the arrest would not affect its current or future research into Russian cyber activities. The company said that "as an IT security company, Kaspersky Lab is determined to detect and neutralize all forms of malicious programs, regardless of their origin or purpose." For now, Stoyanov is officially suspended from his post at Kaspersky Lab, according to the company. "The work of Kaspersky Lab’s Computer Incidents Investigation Team is unaffected by these developments." Stoyanov in 2015 authored a detailed report for Kaspersky Lab on how Russian financial cybercrime works.

The report notes how the risk of prosecution is low for Russian-speaking cybercriminals: "The lack of established mechanisms for international cooperation also plays into the hands of criminals: for example, Kaspersky Lab experts know that the members of some criminal groups permanently reside and work in Russia’s neighbors, while the citizens of the neighboring states involved in criminal activity often live and operate in the territory of the Russian Federation," he wrote. "Kaspersky Lab is doing everything possible to terminate the activity of cybercriminal groups and encourages other companies and law enforcement agencies in all countries to cooperate," he wrote. Aleks Gostev, chief security expert for Kaspersky Lab's Global Research and Analysis Team, in a tweet today said that Stoyanov "never worked with any APT stuff," dismissing some online speculation that the arrest was somehow related to cyber espionage research. He tweeted that the case wouldn't stop the security firm from its work. Kaspersky Lab is "an international team of experts.
It's impossible to prevent us from releasing data." Related Content:   Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com.
She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ...
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