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Report: Theranos used shell company to secretly buy outside lab equipment

WSJ describes newly-unsealed depositions of 22 former employees, board members.

Go west, young techies, for IT jobs

If you want a tech job in the United States, your chances are better living in California.According to industry analyst group CompTIA in its Cyberstates 2017 report, California still leads the rest of the country when it comes to total tech sector employment.

But cities in other states are also making a good showing. New York City (and New York state in general); Austin, Texas; Raleigh, N.C.; Boston,; Washington; Atlanta; and Chicago are all major hot spots for tech jobs by one measure or another.[ Have a tech story to share? If we publish it, we’ll send you a $50 American Express gift card — and keep you anonymous.
Send it to offtherecord@infoworld.com. | We've all been there: 7 hardware horror stories from the help desk. | Follow Off the Record on Twitter and subscribe to the newsletter. ]
What’s more, the overall trend for the U.S. tech job market in 2016 was positive, no matter where you lived.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How cloud computing has changed homework time—for parents

As assignments move out of the backpack and into the cloud, parental involvement suffers.

Red-light camera grace period goes from 0.1 to 0.3 seconds, Chicago...

Official: “[This] is not an invitation to drivers to try to beat the red light.”

1 million NYC homes can’t get Verizon FiOS, so the city...

Verizon wants another four years to cover remaining 1 million households.

Muppet Guys Talking explores Jim Henson’s tech, genius, generosity

Review: Riveting conversation with major Muppet actors flies by way too quickly.

MacroSolve: Donald Trump Jr.’s favorite patent enforcer

Trump's son knows the difference between "patent trolls" and "true innovators."

YouTube killing its most annoying ad format: The 30-second unskippable

The unpopular ads will be gone in 2018.

Why Elon Musk played nice with Donald Trump—but may not for...

For Musk, revamping the H-1B visa program is probably a deal breaker.

Science off to a rough start in the Trump administration

It’s too soon to say which policies are permanent, but here’s what we know.

New York approves a 90 MW wind farm off the coast...

The Long Island coastline.Stanley Zimney reader comments 36 Share this story On Wednesday, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that the state had approved a 90 MW offshore wind farm to be installed off the coast of Long Island.

That would make what will be called the South Fork Wind Farm the biggest offshore wind farm in the US.

The announcement comes just a month after Block Island, a facility off the coast of Rhode Island, became the first ever commercial offshore wind farm in the US to transmit electricity in late 2016. Deepwater Wind, the company that installed the turbines off Block Island, will also be supplying the turbines for South Fork.
In a press release, the New York governor’s office wrote that the turbines will be placed 30 miles southeast of Montauk and “out of sight from Long Island’s beaches.” The press release added that South Fork will provide electricity for 50,000 Long Island homes. Two weeks ago, Governor Cuomo announced that New York would commit to installing 2.4 GW of offshore wind by 2030.

That comes just as the state announced that Indian Point, a 2 GW nuclear energy facility just north of New York City, would close by 2021.

The state of New York celebrated the closure of Indian Point, claiming that the plant was unsafe and too close to a major metropolitan area.

But critics of the move said it would be difficult for New York to replace all of that greenhouse-gas-free energy with renewable energy. In his statement today, Governor Cuomo reiterated that New York was pushing to have 50 percent of its energy come from renewable sources by 2030. Elizabeth Bibi, Deputy Director of Media Relations for the governor's office, cited Superstorm Sandy, a violent storm that rocked New York in 2012 with devastating flooding and power outages, as a reason to expedite updating New York’s grid with renewable power.
South Fork would "provide greater reliability and resiliency for a part of the country very familiar with extreme weather events and outages," Bibi said. According to the New York Times, the wind farm will be situated on a 256-square-mile parcel that’s leased from the federal government.
It will initially have 15 turbines but could support up to 200 turbines. The Times also noted that the project is expected to cost $740 million, down from an earlier projection of $1 billion, which Deepwater Wind will finance with loans and equity investments.

The Long Island Power Authority said it would purchase all of South Fork Wind’s output for 20 years—the renewable electricity is expected to cost rate payers an extra $1.19 a month on average.

More, cheaper, bigger, faster: The defense and cyber strategy of Donald...

Enlarge / Where's the defense and cyber-weapon procurement budget going, Mr. President-elect?Getty Images | Joe Raedle reader comments 75 Share this story Since Election Day, President-elect Donald Trump has taken an inordinate interest in some of the minutia of defense policy. His tweets (particularly about the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and the Air Force One presidential aircraft replacement program) have sent shockwaves through the defense industry. The same is true of the cyber realm—particularly in his treatment of the intelligence community that currently dominates the US' cyber-defense capabilities. The one thing that is certain is that Trump wants more muscle in both departments, urging an increase in the number of troops, ships, planes, and weapons deployed by the Department of Defense; the end of defense budget sequestration; and an expansion of the US nuclear and ballistic missile defense arsenal. And he has also pledged a new focus on offensive "cyber" capabilities, as outlined by his campaign, "to deter attacks by both state and non-state actors and, if necessary, to respond appropriately." That sort of aggressive posture is not a surprise. But the policies that will drive the use of those physical and digital forces are still a bit murky. Considering the position Trump has taken regarding the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and his attitudes toward Russia, Trump's statements may hint at a desire for a Fortress America—armed to the teeth and going it alone in every domain of conflict. Saddle up While not quite on a Reagan-esque scale, the Trump surge would (based on his statements) bring forces back above their active size during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq (though less than during the 2007 "surge" period of the Iraq War). Trump declared that he'll add about 60,000 more active duty soldiers to the Army, increase the Navy's fleet to 350 ships, increase the Marine Corps' strength by over a dozen battalions (roughly 12,000 Marines), and "provide the Air Force with the 12,000 fighters they need." On the strategic front, Trump has tweeted that he wants to expand and improve the US military's nuclear capabilities, modernizing and increasing weapons to improve their deterrent value. The modernization effort had already been queued up by President Barack Obama's administration, including the new Long Range Strike Bomber program awarded to Northrop Grumman. But those investments have been at the expense of other military (particularly Air Force) programs. Trump has also proposed investment in a "serious missile defense system" based on updating the Navy's Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruisers' Aegis systems and building more Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyers. The ballistic missile defense version of Aegis and the Standard Missile 3 (RIM-161) missile it controls are currently only capable of intercepting short- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles, not intercontinental ballistic missiles; to have a chance at taking down a US-targeted threat from North Korea, for example, they would have to be very close to the launch site and hit it early in its launch (the boost phase). How will Trump pay for all this hardware? By "conducting a full audit of the Pentagon, eliminating incorrect payments, reducing duplicative bureaucracy, collecting unpaid taxes, and ending unwanted and unauthorized federal programs," whatever those might be. There's certainly some room in the budget to be gained through increased administrative efficiency, as a Defense Business Board report found that the DOD could save as much in $125 billion in overhead (though that number may have been slightly inflated, as it was based on corporate, and not military, business models). Cyber up On the cyber side, it appears Trump wants to put the military on point for cyber defense. The campaign platform pushed for the DOD to place a new emphasis on offensive capabilities, including making enhancements to the US Cyber Command—currently led by NSA Director Admiral Mike Rogers—to increase its offensive punch and turn it into an effective cyber-deterrence force. “As a deterrent against attacks on our critical resources, the United States must possess the unquestioned capacity to launch crippling cyber counter-attacks,” Trump said in a speech in October. Just exactly how that would work isn't clear. Given the difficulty of attribution—a point Trump made repeatedly in his castigation of intelligence findings of Russian interference in the election—the kind of very attributable cyber force that US Cyber Command would wield as part of the Strategic Command would likely not act as much of a deterrent to low-level intrusions, espionage, and information operations. Yet those make up the majority of what has recently been dumped into the "cyberwarfare" shopping cart. Trump's policy outline also calls for the Joint Chiefs of Staff to participate in Trump's vaunted "Cyber Review Team," contributing experts to evaluate "all US cyber defenses"—including critical infrastructure in the private sector—alongside law enforcement and experts from private industry. The Cyber Review Team, which may or may not have anything to do with the group being headed by former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, has a big mandate: The Cyber Review Team will provide specific recommendations for safeguarding different entities with the best defense technologies tailored to the likely threats and will follow up regularly at various federal agencies and departments. The Cyber Review Team will establish detailed protocols and mandatory cyber awareness training for all government employees while remaining current on evolving methods of cyber-attack. On the domestic end, the Trump administration would seek to take the same model that has been applied to terrorism to the cyber side, creating joint task forces that put Department of Justice, FBI, and Department of Homeland Security personnel alongside state and local law enforcement to respond to "cyber threats." Nothing Trump or his proxies have said indicates any policy around shaping what "norms" in the world connecting the digital to the physical should be. If anything, Trump's position seems to be that a cyber-armed world is a polite world—or at least one that will be polite to the United States, the only confirmed state cyberwar actor to hit another nation's infrastructure (aside from squirrels). The eyes have it It will take some time to see how Trump's indifference toward the US' obligations toward allies will affect overall defense and cyber-security policy. But if reports are true regarding US intelligence officials warning allies of Trump's Russia ties and if Trump goes forward with weakening the US involvement in NATO, his views could significantly affect both—especially in the realm of digital intelligence collection. A weakened relationship with the other members of the "Five Eyes" group—the UK, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada—on a military level could impact the National Security Agency's (and the CIA's) ability to collect intelligence from infrastructure that has up until now been widely shared. Only one thing is for certain: the defense industry should be expecting an aircraft carrier full of dollars headed in their direction.