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Faster machine learning is coming to the Linux kernel

It's been a long time in the works, but a memory management featurenbsp;intended to give machine learning or other GPU-powered applications anbsp;major performance boostnbsp;is close to making it into one of the next revisions of the kernel.Heterogenous memory management (HMM) allows a devicersquo;s drivernbsp;to mirror the address space for a process under its own memory management. As Red Hat developer Jeacute;rocirc;me Glissenbsp;explains, this makes it easier for hardware devices like GPUs to directly access the memory of a process without the extra overhead of copying anything.
It also doesn't violate the memory protection features afforded by modern OSes.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Java modularity specification opposed by Red Hat, IBM is voted down

A Java modularity specification failed to pass in a vote by Java executive committee members, leaving the future of the technology in question. The issue could hold up the planned July 27 release of Java 9, which is slated to include modularity.Balloting on Java Specification Request 376 was completed on Monday.

The modular plan for Java, intended to make it easier to scale the platform, has been opposed by companies including Red Hat and IBM. Red Hat, in particular, questioned many parts of the plan, including raising issues about potential application compatibility problems.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Oracle hits back at modular Java critics

With voting on a module system for Java set to close within the Java community, a high-ranking official at Oracle is again defending the plan amid criticism from Red Hat.Modularity is the main feature in Java 9, which is due to arrive July 27—if the disagreement over modularization does not hold up the release. Oracle's Mark Reinhold, chief architect in the company's Java platform group, sent out an email on an openjdk mailing list Monday, arguing the issues being brought up have already been covered.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Java modular battle heats up as Oracle criticizes Red Hat, IBM

Amidst a budding controversy surrounding the module system planned for Java, Oracle’s chief Java architect, Mark Reinhold, lashed out today at Red Hat and IBM’s opposition, saying the companies are just guarding their own self interests.In an open letter to the Java Community Process (JCP) Executive Commitee published Friday morning, Reinhold was highly critical of the two rival vendors.

The current disagreement centers on Java Specification Request 376, which focuses on the module system featured as part of Project Jigsaw. Red Hat Mid­dle­ware ini­tially agreed to the goals and re­quire­ments of the JSR, but then worked con­sis­tently to un­der­mine them, Reinhold said.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Oracle rethinks modular Java plan after Red Hat’s objections

Oracle's chief Java architect has proposed tweaks to Java's modular plan.

The revisions were said to be not in response to recent objections by Red Hat and IBM, but they do appear to address one of the concerns.In a post to an openjdk mailing list o...

Java module system may stall platform’s next release

Java 9, the next edition of the platform, might actually be delayed by objections raised recently by Red Hat and IBM over the workings of its module system.Java Development Kit 9, the next edition of standard Java, had been proceeding toward its planned July 27 release after earlier bumps in the road over modularity.

But now Red Hat and IBM have opposed the module plan. “JDK 9 might be held up by this,” Oracle’s Georges Saab, vice president of development for the Java platform, said late Wednesday afternoon. “As is the case for all major Java SE releases, feedback from the JCP [Java Community Process] may affect the timeline.  Based on more than two years of feedback from weekly preview builds, we’re confident it meets the goals of the JSR [Java Specification Request] and the needs of developers.”To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Red Hat, IBM opposition could hold up Java 9 release

Java 9, the next edition of the platform, might be delayed by objections raised recently by Red Hat and IBM over the workings of its module system.Java Development Kit 9, the next edition of standard Java, had been proceeding toward its planned July 27 release after earlier bumps in the road over modularity.

But now Red Hat and IBM have opposed the module plan. “JDK 9 might be held up by this,” Oracle’s Georges Saab, vice president of development for the Java platform, said late Wednesday afternoon. “As is the case for all major Java SE releases, feedback from the JCP [Java Community Process] may affect the timeline.

Based on more than two years of feedback from weekly preview builds, we’re confident it meets the goals of the JSR [Java Specification Request] and the needs of developers.”To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

3 takeaways from Red Hat’s AWS deal for OpenShift

Red Hat and Amazon have long been framed as rivals, but only in the sense that anyone who provides on-prem Linux and PaaS products competes to some degree with a cloud provider. Really, they’re more like peanut butter and jelly.Yesterday, Red Hat unveiled details about a new partnership with Amazon to support integrating some widely used AWS options into Red Hat’s OpenShift PaaS. The list of services covers basic infrastructure (AWS Route 53, AWS Cloudfront), data (AWS Redshift/Aurora/Athena), and cutting-edge technologies (AWS Lambda).[ To the cloud! Real-world container migrations. | Dig into the the red-hot open source framework in InfoWorld’s beginner’s guide to Docker. ]Here are three reasons why offering those services with OpenShift is big for Red Hat and its customers—and how it could potentially be big for other cloud vendors too.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Red Hat OpenShift adds containers and microservices features for developers

With OpenShift, Red Hat wants to make its PaaS as friendly to developers as to the rest of an enterprise team.Hence, Red Hat is adding a pair of developer-focused features to OpenShift: a new cloud-native, browser-based development environment for building automatically containerized code and a set of runtimes for building microservices in OpenShift in a mix of common languages.[ Get started: A developer’s guide to serverless computing. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld's App Dev Report newsletter. ]The revolution will be developerized For starters, the new OpenShift.io dev environment lets teams work together on code that's containerized automatically and deployed continuously.
It's built with open source components, chiefly the Eclipse Che cloud-based IDE and in-browser code editor.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Red Hat and IBM raise objections to Java 9 modularization

Modularization is slated to be the key feature in Java SE (Standard Edition) 9, due in late July.

But Java participants Red Hat and IBM have raised concerns that the base module plan could lead to incompatibilities with applications and enterprise Java.In a recent bulletin, Scott Stark, vice president of architecture for Red Hat’s JBoss group, outlined a litany of issues Red Hat and other Java Executive Committee members have with JSR (Java Specification Request) 376, pertaining to the Java Platform Modular System, a central component of the Project Jigsaw module Java effort.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Docker’s Moby cast in same mold as Fedora’s Red Hat

When Docker announced the Moby Project earlier this week, it wasn’t entirely clear why it mattered—or even what it was.
It sounded like Docker was trying to share its internal processes for building Docker from components donated to the community.But Docker’s GitHub site has since been reworked as the Moby Project, and the point is much clearer. Moby is to Docker what Fedora Project is to Red Hat: an entirely separate brand, explicitly designated as a community project, that serves as a collection point and proving ground for the open source pieces that go into the commercial edition of the product.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Ansible’s rise is fueling Red Hat’s reinvention

Ask a Red Hat salesperson what is her favorite product to sell, and she’ll probably tell you OpenShift.

Close on its heels, however, is Ansible, the open source automation platform Red Hat acquired in late 2015.

Ansible has been on a tear of late, quickly rising to become the hottest devops tool in the market.The question is why.

A bigger question, however, is what it means for Red Hat.

For a company that thrives deep in the bowels of enterprise infrastructure, Ansible (and OpenShift) represent a march toward a simpler way to deliver IT.[ The cloud storage security gap—and how to close it. | The InfoWorld Deep Dive: How to make document sharing really work in Office 365. ]Popular with the geeks The reason Ansible is so popular within Red Hat’s field is that it’s wildly popular with enterprise IT. How popular? Well, Ansible already finds its way into a third of all Red Hat deals, as Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst indicated on the company’s most recent earnings call.

That is staggering when you consider that Red Hat didn’t acquire Ansible until late 2015, and Ansible didn’t even exist as a project until 2012 or as a company until 2013.

For Ansible to be contributing in a significant way to Red Hat’s $2 billion-plus in annual revenue is a major accomplishment.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here