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Details New ebay-cors-filter package is now available. The ebay-cors-filter package adds CORS support to the Red Hat EnterpriseVirtualization REST API.

This support depends on a filter developed by eBay. Solution Before applying this update, make sure all previously released erratarelevant to your system have been applied.For details on how to apply this update, refer to:https://access.redhat.com/articles/11258 Updated packages Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.6 SRPMS: ebay-cors-filter-1.0.1-1.el6.src.rpm     MD5: 6cfe92fd907879eb559c3a590e433d12SHA-256: eb32cd379075b3978a172244e9dd16603dd972d139d7e66a7b2841eb47485877   x86_64: ebay-cors-filter-1.0.1-1.el6.noarch.rpm     MD5: c5f3031a4f2a503ba4765d97e7c7f192SHA-256: 6de9702b4ce1b3a8a423bc5bfda8cc5722503b44c5cbb3909e7ea886750ad473   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) Bugs fixed (see bugzilla for more information) 1186777 - New package for the eBay CORS filter These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:https://www.redhat.com/security/team/key/#package The Red Hat security contact is secalert@redhat.com. More contact details at http://www.redhat.com/security/team/contact/
Details Updated vdsm-jsonrpc-java packages that fix several bugs and add variousenhancements are now available. The vdsm-jsonrpc-java package provides to VDSM the JSON-RPC implementation forthe Java programming language. Solution Before applying this update, make sure all previously released erratarelevant to your system have been applied.For details on how to apply this update, refer to:https://access.redhat.com/articles/11258 Updated packages Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.6 SRPMS: vdsm-jsonrpc-java-1.1.9-1.el6ev.src.rpm     MD5: cd2ffc2c464e9647357457e1df6af135SHA-256: 7a852ee4c6eed236fd347f2e57fb8d16d6961cbaddc6341ecaef60c58001aa7f   x86_64: vdsm-jsonrpc-java-1.1.9-1.el6ev.noarch.rpm     MD5: a6a713662a1d4e02879c4288abf10bc4SHA-256: e16e60938b859fd5263aecde04c71a4b9b694a68c6b81992c2568b89bc99a142   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) Bugs fixed (see bugzilla for more information) 1193901 - [vdsmfake] - Volume.create missing parameters These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:https://www.redhat.com/security/team/key/#package The Red Hat security contact is secalert@redhat.com. More contact details at http://www.redhat.com/security/team/contact/
A vulnerability in the HTTPS inspection engine of the Cisco ASA Content Security and Control Security Services Module (CSC-SSM) could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to cause exhaustion of available memory, system instabi...
Details Updated unboundid-ldapsdk packages that fix several bugs and add variousenhancements are now available. The UnboundID LDAP SDK for Java is a free Java library for communicating withLDAP directory servers and performing related tasks like reading and writingLDIF, encoding and decoding data using base64 and ASN.1 BER, and performingsecure communication. Solution Before applying this update, make sure all previously released erratarelevant to your system have been applied.For details on how to apply this update, refer to:https://access.redhat.com/articles/11258 Updated packages Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.6 SRPMS: unboundid-ldapsdk-3.0.0-1.el6ev.src.rpm     MD5: ba4a36f310b4202f6811aa7c6d16bd28SHA-256: 6a80fe7da9cc9a908e4fad8278f76e15c199b2537ad3b7611c80baf97e05e93b   x86_64: unboundid-ldapsdk-3.0.0-1.el6ev.noarch.rpm     MD5: 100364ac1e119c688e58b228f04c7f22SHA-256: 418feb0985b900eec247093d83f81a5dc02f47420ef62f35cabf084717f1fec7 unboundid-ldapsdk-javadoc-3.0.0-1.el6ev.noarch.rpm     MD5: 6c69baacf8b1eeb428c5f0ea35c4133fSHA-256: 41d274e37d728ba65ef4056d5fcd493441eeda97167737a27b01e4ffc87f4277   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) Bugs fixed (see bugzilla for more information) 1237311 - [RFE] unboundid-ldapsdk-3.0.0 version bump These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:https://www.redhat.com/security/team/key/#package The Red Hat security contact is secalert@redhat.com. More contact details at http://www.redhat.com/security/team/contact/
Details Updated ovirt-engine-extension-aaa-ldap packages that fix several bugs and addvarious enhancements are now available. The ovirt-engine-extension-aaa-ldap extension allows users to customize theirexternal directory setup easily.

The ovirt-engine-extension-aaa-ldap extensionsupports many different LDAP server types, and an interactive setup script isprovided to assist you with the setup for most LDAP types. Solution Before applying this update, make sure all previously released erratarelevant to your system have been applied.For details on how to apply this update, refer to:https://access.redhat.com/articles/11258 Updated packages Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.6 SRPMS: ovirt-engine-extension-aaa-ldap-1.1.2-1.el6ev.src.rpm     MD5: 68a67e7ad471dc9dcbb256365816bdd4SHA-256: 540999e9fe7c505a92c7e86d445ee26b5a878850df9d68ba6043493188682834   x86_64: ovirt-engine-extension-aaa-ldap-1.1.2-1.el6ev.noarch.rpm     MD5: 7d0aeacef5698bc1536f137d0f2aaf15SHA-256: c3d6a86dc49e5e53e1fcf3a69b5a974a0c4dd86a76c3df6922f73e2dc0de088e ovirt-engine-extension-aaa-ldap-setup-1.1.2-1.el6ev.noarch.rpm     MD5: a95088a971d36b61c7bedc6ab83d4beaSHA-256: d443353ada5a1becc918374bcf7ab66559ce1474e3eeb3324ac0d948fa63b96e   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) Bugs fixed (see bugzilla for more information) 1230108 - [RFE] ovirt-engine-extension-aaa-ldap-1.1.2 version bump These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:https://www.redhat.com/security/team/key/#package The Red Hat security contact is secalert@redhat.com. More contact details at http://www.redhat.com/security/team/contact/
An updated rhev-hypervisor package that fixes several security issues,bugs, and enhancements is now available.Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Importantsecurity impact.

A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) basescore, wh...
Advisory: RHBA-2016:0374-1 Type: Bug Fix Advisory Severity: N/A Issued on: 2016-03-09 Last updated on: 2016-03-09 Affected Products: Red Hat Certification Details An updated redhat-certification-commons package that fixes a bug is nowavailable for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. The redhat-certification-commons package provides a set of common tests for RedHat Partner Certification.

This release of the redhat-certification-commonspackage fixes a bug and provides the ability to run the certification test suitewithout internet connectivity. Solution Before applying this update, make sure all previously released erratarelevant to your system have been applied.For details on how to apply this update, refer to:https://access.redhat.com/articles/11258 Updated packages Red Hat Certification SRPMS: redhat-certification-commons-1.2-1.el6.src.rpm     MD5: 9f1e08bef1dfce87a2a4da5fc3bd00c8SHA-256: 1f9c071e9098898a0e99eb36225cc3577b640b84b2e465174eba1f2599207aa7 redhat-certification-commons-1.2-1.el7.src.rpm     MD5: b6e4713a410bdc878f23e4c86ad8863eSHA-256: 36defbdd105d2737b2c878675b00572ce6a30f787e70a600d3bb74de7ef501c5   IA-32: redhat-certification-commons-1.2-1.el6.noarch.rpm     MD5: dfc626cc95fd2bd38430f986afc58e87SHA-256: d8a906da9477322b895661f7872e581e243abf0bc9a7583b5377a0b0c4b43f7d   PPC: redhat-certification-commons-1.2-1.el6.noarch.rpm     MD5: dfc626cc95fd2bd38430f986afc58e87SHA-256: d8a906da9477322b895661f7872e581e243abf0bc9a7583b5377a0b0c4b43f7d redhat-certification-commons-1.2-1.el7.noarch.rpm     MD5: 75211ac9653db7db7d2c8c55ef704c73SHA-256: 822388a8d21196b2873bd406dbda807a11e54e2b25eaf1849d76d75fc25261fa   s390x: redhat-certification-commons-1.2-1.el6.noarch.rpm     MD5: dfc626cc95fd2bd38430f986afc58e87SHA-256: d8a906da9477322b895661f7872e581e243abf0bc9a7583b5377a0b0c4b43f7d redhat-certification-commons-1.2-1.el7.noarch.rpm     MD5: 75211ac9653db7db7d2c8c55ef704c73SHA-256: 822388a8d21196b2873bd406dbda807a11e54e2b25eaf1849d76d75fc25261fa   x86_64: redhat-certification-commons-1.2-1.el6.noarch.rpm     MD5: dfc626cc95fd2bd38430f986afc58e87SHA-256: d8a906da9477322b895661f7872e581e243abf0bc9a7583b5377a0b0c4b43f7d redhat-certification-commons-1.2-1.el7.noarch.rpm     MD5: 75211ac9653db7db7d2c8c55ef704c73SHA-256: 822388a8d21196b2873bd406dbda807a11e54e2b25eaf1849d76d75fc25261fa   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) Bugs fixed (see bugzilla for more information) 1309332 - SCAP OVAL checks fails when run without internet access Keywords OpenSCAP, redhat-certification-commons These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:https://www.redhat.com/security/team/key/#package The Red Hat security contact is secalert@redhat.com. More contact details at http://www.redhat.com/security/team/contact/
Let's Encrypt, an organization set up to encourage broader use of encryption on the Web, has distributed 1 million free digital certificates in just three months. The digital certificates cover 2.5 million domains, most of which had never implemented SSL/TLS (Secure Sockets Layer/Transport Layer Security), which encrypts content exchanged between a system and a user.

An encrypted connection is signified in most browsers by "https" and a padlock appearing in the URL bar. "Much more work remains to be done before the Internet is free from insecure protocols, but this is substantial and rapid progress," according to a blog post by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, one of Let's Encrypt's supporters. The organization is run by the ISRG (Internet Security Research Group) and is backed by Mozilla, Cisco, Akamai, Facebook and others. There's been a push in recent years to encourage websites to implement SSL/TLS, driven in part by a rise in cybercrime, data breaches and government surveillance. Google, Yahoo, and Facebook have all taken steps to secure their services. SSL/TLS certificates are sold by major players such as Verisign and Comodo, with certain types of certificates costing hundreds of dollars and needing periodic renewal.

Critics contend the cost puts off some website operators, which is in part why Let's Encrypt launched a free project. "It is clear that the cost and bureaucracy of obtaining certificates was forcing many websites to continue with the insecure HTTP protocol, long after we've known that HTTPS needs to be the default," the EFF wrote.
Barry Mattacott, marketing director at security specialist Wick Hill Group, looks at the security risks of linking more and more smart devices to our networks.

Are we just creating ever more vulnerable endpoints in today’s world of the Internet of Things?Back in the good old days, we nailed the front door up tight with a firewall and we knew, that with good security on our gateway, our network was safe from the nasties of the outside world.

But those pesky kids in their bedrooms, not to mention state sponsored cybercriminals, worked out that they could circumnavigate our state-of- the-art firewall by looking for a way in at the opposite end of our network - the endpoint. Barry Mattacott, marketing director Wick Hill So now we all agree that securing the endpoint is essential, but just where is it and what does it look like?Since those early days, there has been a massive proliferation of endpoints and security issues have grown alongside them. You can't go anywhere or do anything without risking an infection. A recent survey found that almost two thirds of USB sticks that were lost/found on public transport were infected with malware.
I guess this raises several issues.

Definitely, don't plug any old USB stick you find into your computer - that's how Stuxnet got its start in life after all.

The survey also begs the question, of why so many of these USB sticks are infected.

Could it be that people are deliberately infecting USBs and "losing" them? Infected USBs can today be considered a fairly traditional attack vector, along with code attached to downloaded files and drive-bys leaping out of infected websites to get you.

The security industry has made a pile of cash developing products to protect us and it's all fairly much in hand. But now we have a game changer because endpoints aren’t the same as they were.

Firstly, we had the revolution that was the mobile endpoint. Mobile phones and tablets are now huge players on our networks.

They have effectively put network endpoints in our pockets and allowed us to take them down the pub and lose them. The technology to protect them has been available for some time, but the adoption has been woefully slow. You would have thought US Federal Agencies would be right on top of it, but a 2015 survey found 61 percent of agencies do not apply their network security policies to mobile devices! So what does the future hold for the endpoint? Without doubt, the Internet of Things (IoT) means they are going to be everywhere! Network attached security systems that give you video pictures of your front door and allow callers to leave recorded messages, are essentially connecting your door bell to your main processor (home PC). Your Hive controlled heating system is connecting you to the Internet. Despite these being serious systems, many have arrived on our networks and in our homes with gaping holes in their security.

British Gas took a thrashing in the national press when their control system was found to be a burglar's dream, easily allowing access to the heating schedule, which could tell them if the owner was at home, or even if they were away for an extended period of time. Even cars have become endpoints. Until recently they were fairly much self-contained. Yes, they communicated with the Internet and manufacturers’ control networks and as such they were hackable. We saw hackers demonstrate that they could take control of a Jeep and run it off the road.

This triggered a recall of 1.4 million cars by Chrysler in order to patch the operating system.

But they were somebody else's problem in that they didn't communicate with your network, so were not one of your endpoints. But car manufacturers, including Ford, are developing on-board systems to allow you to carry out vital activities like turning on your smart kettle whilst on the road.

This requires them to connect via the Internet to your own network. On the one hand, that kettle might be ever so smart in that it carries significantly more processing power than the 64 Kb memory operating at 0.043 MHz in the Apollo guidance system that put man on the moon. On the other hand, it's not smart enough to be fully secured against man-in-the-middle attacks that will allow a hacker to penetrate your network.

And once they are in, will they be able to access your car sitting in the driveway and steal it? It doesn't really matter how secure Ford makes your car, if your kettle is going to leave the door open. Why? Why is it that the Internet of Things is so woefully behind the curve regarding security?To start with, your average kettle manufacturer doesn't have a great pedigree in network security.

They might make an awesomely efficient kettle but in the current climate they will find it difficult to find and employ a suitable security expert.

They are also in a rush.

They have just come up with the world saving idea of adding internet connectivity to your kettle, so obviously they are in a huge rush to get it to market before everyone else thinks of it and beats them to it.

And of course, functionality will always beat security. No one wants to go through multi-factor authentication every time they want a cup of tea. So what can you do about it? Purchase (and attach to your network) with care. When it comes to the Internet of Things, you are putting your trust in the hands of others.

There is little that you personally can do to ensure that your TV, kettle, car, fridge, etc., etc. is secure. One piece of advice is to look out for names that you feel you can trust with security. Manufacturers are starting to come up with solutions for these gaping security holes.

Gemalto, for example, is emerging as a front runner in the field of IoT security.

They have hardware modules, platforms and service solutions that allow you to connect and protect any machine-to-machine or electronic consumer device.

They are currently working with all sorts of OEMs, mobile network operators and industrial manufacturers in various markets. http://www.gemalto.com/iot Barracuda Networks felt the need to bring out a brand new range of products designed to protect the Internet of Things and Machine to Machine connectivity.

Their S Series currently includes Barracuda NextGen Firewall Secure Connector 1 (SC1) and the Barracuda NextGen Secure Access Concentrator (SAC).

These two appliances will make it a lot easier and infinitely more secure for enterprises to benefit from and roll-out largescale deployments of devices like Automated Teller Machines (ATMs), point-of-sale kiosks, wind power stations and networked industrial machines in remote locations. https://www.barracuda.com/products/nextgenfirewall-s Another well-known name in security, Kaspersky Lab, is making a move in the automotive space and is currently in talks with most of the world’s car manufacturers, particularly around the area of securing self-driving cars.

They are looking to secure not only the industrial controls of the production process but also the connected car. Kaspersky Lab is coming at this from a great place as they are already involved in protecting Ferrari.

Aside from the usual endpoint protection they also integrate with existing complex infrastructure, including industrial technologies and mobile devices.
In future, if your car is protected by Kaspersky, then you can probably be pretty sure your kettle can’t steal it! http://www.techworld.com/news/startups/kaspersky-looks-secure-self-driving-cars-factories-theyre-made-in-3615206/ You can also do some research on good old Google.

Thinking about stuffing a EZCast Streamer in your TV’s USB port? A quick check online will find a recent report from Check Point which revealed that the wi-fi network the EZCast sets up, can easily be breached, allowing the attacker access to your main network, where they can wreak havoc or steal confidential data.
So don't be in a rush to buy.

And check it out before you do. http://blog.checkpoint.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/EZCast_Report_Check_Point.pdf One important thing to check is whether the firmware on the product you are buying can be updated. Users of SimpliSafe wireless home alarm systems recently found out that the system is stupidly easy to hack with basic sniffing equipment, allowing its PIN to be grabbed from 30 metres away.

But to really rub salt into the wounds, the hardware apparently cannot be patched or updated to overcome the vulnerability, which leaves owners with no choice but to junk their system. http://thehackernews.com/2016/02/hack-home-security-alarm.html So what’s the best tactic if you don’t want to fall victim to security weaknesses in your clever consumer devices, intelligent cars and machine-to-machine equipment which makeup the Internet of Things? The best advice would be to try and resist the frivolous items like kettles and door bells and stick to things made by reputable manufacturers, preferably ones that have some sort of pedigree in networking. ENDS About the authorBarry Mattacott is marketing director of Wick Hill Group, which is based in Woking, Surrey and Hamburg Germany. Wick Hill Group is part of Rigby Private Equity (RPE), a subsidiary of Rigby Group Investments, an independent company within Rigby Group plc.
Specialist distributor Zycko is also part of RPE, and in co-operation with Zycko, Wick Hill can offer a pan-European service which provides a common proposition and consistent delivery for vendor and reseller partners covering 13 countries. Users of products sourced through Wick Hill include most of the Times Top 1000 companies, in addition to many non-commercial organisations, government departments and SMEs across all business sectors.

Through its channel partners, the company has delivered IT solutions to more than a million users world-wide. Wick Hill currently has offices in Woking, Surrey, with sister offices in Hamburg. ENDS For further press information, please contact Annabelle Brown on 01326 318212, email pr@wickhill.com, Wick Hill https://www.wickhill.com or www.twitter.com/wickhill.

For pic of Barry Mattacott please go to https://www.wickhill.com/company/press/pictures or contact Annabelle Brown.
Updated nss packages that fix one security issue are now available forRed Hat Enterprise Linux 5.Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical securityimpact.

A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, whichgives a detailed severity rating, is available from the CVE link in theReferences section. Network Security Services (NSS) is a set of libraries designed to supportthe cross-platform development of security-enabled client and serverapplications.A heap-based buffer overflow flaw was found in the way NSS parsed certainASN.1 structures.

An attacker could use this flaw to create a speciallycrafted certificate which, when parsed by NSS, could cause it to crash, orexecute arbitrary code, using the permissions of the user running anapplication compiled against the NSS library. (CVE-2016-1950)Red Hat would like to thank the Mozilla project for reporting this issue.Upstream acknowledges Francis Gabriel as the original reporter.All nss users are advised to upgrade to these updated packages, whichcontain a backported patch to correct this issue.

For the update to takeeffect, all applications linked to the nss library must be restarted, orthe system rebooted. Before applying this update, make sure all previously released erratarelevant to your system have been applied.For details on how to apply this update, refer to:https://access.redhat.com/articles/11258RHEL Desktop Workstation (v. 5 client) SRPMS: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.src.rpm     MD5: 544778df37f1d2d9ce9e11098bc3b210SHA-256: e2ed10921358fe438dc597b79575e0288375277682c1f794f616d118703cec72   IA-32: nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: e9ac998fc83624b5e42b8ef508c70db4SHA-256: 7d77d7819b16fc71965ed86ca7e10f6be48c5997a13512fb8d77f56d3bf13b74 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 472d167a003745770ca3d0b7c7109ed4SHA-256: 333a39e4714a367ac8f46a26c3adb6981b8e54b09b4a241c43a84c0a2a8195fd   x86_64: nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 45061cba17fae1dfe581a415d44773bfSHA-256: 72a6d9440442e9e6765d9f22877b72a83bfa00dcfe9a704b50e565f69795d1d3 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: e9ac998fc83624b5e42b8ef508c70db4SHA-256: 7d77d7819b16fc71965ed86ca7e10f6be48c5997a13512fb8d77f56d3bf13b74 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4d831042af7dfa6e80ad6bf9579cd4efSHA-256: 65ddd0935783f0ac00c61fd3e13d7fb6509f01d3afa423c7dbfdb4c3aabc4281 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 472d167a003745770ca3d0b7c7109ed4SHA-256: 333a39e4714a367ac8f46a26c3adb6981b8e54b09b4a241c43a84c0a2a8195fd nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: c1a2ac387761f45260de137e35545280SHA-256: fb02c20684a651c675e5b81fcba40487e1c8e6cfdcb90d261888347980b9bef9   Red Hat Enterprise Linux (v. 5 server) SRPMS: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.src.rpm     MD5: 544778df37f1d2d9ce9e11098bc3b210SHA-256: e2ed10921358fe438dc597b79575e0288375277682c1f794f616d118703cec72   IA-32: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 83ca14029531b9d549bb8df9f5aac525SHA-256: 450dd70148a25759d516bb7f9ee6864a8038221cd23cffa78dd4c97a6fcaf5b2 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: e9ac998fc83624b5e42b8ef508c70db4SHA-256: 7d77d7819b16fc71965ed86ca7e10f6be48c5997a13512fb8d77f56d3bf13b74 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 472d167a003745770ca3d0b7c7109ed4SHA-256: 333a39e4714a367ac8f46a26c3adb6981b8e54b09b4a241c43a84c0a2a8195fd nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 4dc8eec54f5690c46382ff359057ab2aSHA-256: 8fe0677dc573438c67b08a066581839480190c417fd42f45b426bf9a35a27693   IA-64: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 83ca14029531b9d549bb8df9f5aac525SHA-256: 450dd70148a25759d516bb7f9ee6864a8038221cd23cffa78dd4c97a6fcaf5b2 nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ia64.rpm     MD5: a35672e89acaa20191c2a1d75da4cf71SHA-256: 27ea8e9c557bd3ec8ee5c1f44c9c73a44e55887d83216f6b529c6cb78c95fdd7 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ia64.rpm     MD5: ac3a0adacec8c1952bc40e06d3435bdfSHA-256: 192132ea5cc4e1ba95fdd88208fbf20b0f9b55bbbfe86e749f060a9c30b83c3f nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ia64.rpm     MD5: b002cc06061fe42fa347d0c058ea4811SHA-256: 6a9a2d5772f1ed63cbd4c26a5614ece8fe687840ca3da17d1fb114864085852c nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ia64.rpm     MD5: 2a10e4e1437184cd437d1a43b5501d0cSHA-256: 47c9c10468f87486ecda09fde342a1a5279d2fddc83d20fb090ac8bfa73c82a6 nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ia64.rpm     MD5: 12b8332fe8ac7dc222bb58d44e3708cdSHA-256: 501dba43ca3c730875eb36dfaadebed45504d76fd1a7ca08b7f8a52127d2c097   PPC: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc.rpm     MD5: 5f7cba235a6dfda6d50ca13db34ce18dSHA-256: b25d4537c0b393d46ec963030f6fc920e062f70a38dc63ff575a7fc875dd03cf nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc64.rpm     MD5: f4e685a10dfcf8347dad8d1a2a644933SHA-256: d037cd5df70a5548f0f6fb385e0cdfaa45c1a08ba0c3377c0e39461925b08d68 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc.rpm     MD5: 63f5dcca54604214dc325f4b611ab278SHA-256: 3232b8e8c0ca0442031caf6ee5cfc59b164ddbae71ea0647877d8e000a20dc93 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 202e7f031d0f9c208146a3122d6e2254SHA-256: a935fa28c0fe4abd58ee34124089aa04c36f83032b86ca2425b03773b0e412e0 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc.rpm     MD5: baf4fc80ff841213fd3a7c3a67960cdcSHA-256: f34e24e14ba59f3d4c6cfe02155fe10bbb4ad62a8d41e356477a22ef35f84238 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 914d98205a78f05982fc15b82f5eaf73SHA-256: f25ab7119e9df59585263f5fabc8ca336d592d16ef2e742ad0cbcf9b83a4ae6f nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc.rpm     MD5: 818fad2e71a84adfc38100213c7a45dcSHA-256: 8e0c8f779047f96ed7511e28b159e4dfc4aa2fbd6e3aaf6f6529d7c30afe0b74 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 5bc98dee078cc79717e2f213d0bfc727SHA-256: 55fe6615b778c780abf646158796a8e4d659205dc2f3bb55b5d58dddedf51450 nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc.rpm     MD5: 18b786adc652500b133554e106a5d1eaSHA-256: 160ef3d5462c29caaaba55dafdaea301158c696a3671f9195a0683f858b76200   s390x: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390.rpm     MD5: 6952cec820827c2a220c5dd037bceb68SHA-256: 0c6e38e62e89941560c23c04f2a6bbc1015a484f8859719d323680f1de3574c1 nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: 791a8d37c6cba0c5a1dfed5b2d05f984SHA-256: 203c91421553c236aa4510142607ad9faa771e3ede0b4ea1f189e21d447feb46 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390.rpm     MD5: 5a3c7b1fb3d3cd3ca8715ecf68c57c27SHA-256: c72d63adf72c06f88911d929276e94f8e178629a66b01ca12eddfa25df7da77c nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: bb2633f65366110d759fe4a52c048ae5SHA-256: efd7c0a5246413c2b753a562948d24ca4c30746925281295ef4fbc34cf749f41 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390.rpm     MD5: 9624cff8b5026550f9d649ea5a64e56fSHA-256: e954423ebfc1da59eaf7323b08824d8eac9757e8944dd6dcbd1546eedd98392a nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: ee26742a2127da92358babfd40a579e6SHA-256: e6969d38708320399711a4d97829d92643899420cfd11608eafe12437435474e nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390.rpm     MD5: c19938f16265b38c90a1180a6a06d044SHA-256: 73506eaa4e80c3bd63fc77724d5861a7d2c8288d1042057629e5630b6f0f7612 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: de2245af4b71574cbaef743c42af6c5fSHA-256: ed427c79215cfc23771c775776ea90e4d10601f069f65e41806f6dabda2caade nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: 8f3644756fef8157ab0459a4829562b2SHA-256: 7a9873d6f863882a8456341af4ac51c03b4f88586872accb5143c2865f0b2f8a   x86_64: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 83ca14029531b9d549bb8df9f5aac525SHA-256: 450dd70148a25759d516bb7f9ee6864a8038221cd23cffa78dd4c97a6fcaf5b2 nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4976117843e939b48d8944c3d863c2b3SHA-256: 943076eece09883a2319211f72064bb9cbd3ca45ee8f0d754a58e0a91e38ea8b nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 45061cba17fae1dfe581a415d44773bfSHA-256: 72a6d9440442e9e6765d9f22877b72a83bfa00dcfe9a704b50e565f69795d1d3 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: e9ac998fc83624b5e42b8ef508c70db4SHA-256: 7d77d7819b16fc71965ed86ca7e10f6be48c5997a13512fb8d77f56d3bf13b74 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4d831042af7dfa6e80ad6bf9579cd4efSHA-256: 65ddd0935783f0ac00c61fd3e13d7fb6509f01d3afa423c7dbfdb4c3aabc4281 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 472d167a003745770ca3d0b7c7109ed4SHA-256: 333a39e4714a367ac8f46a26c3adb6981b8e54b09b4a241c43a84c0a2a8195fd nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: c1a2ac387761f45260de137e35545280SHA-256: fb02c20684a651c675e5b81fcba40487e1c8e6cfdcb90d261888347980b9bef9 nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e6937b5083bac59f1f9a23eeeb650f43SHA-256: 8076efffecd7eb91da1bb1115921bfd4b250e599597c1daeb920a9e620fa7550   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 5 client) SRPMS: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.src.rpm     MD5: 544778df37f1d2d9ce9e11098bc3b210SHA-256: e2ed10921358fe438dc597b79575e0288375277682c1f794f616d118703cec72   IA-32: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 83ca14029531b9d549bb8df9f5aac525SHA-256: 450dd70148a25759d516bb7f9ee6864a8038221cd23cffa78dd4c97a6fcaf5b2 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 4dc8eec54f5690c46382ff359057ab2aSHA-256: 8fe0677dc573438c67b08a066581839480190c417fd42f45b426bf9a35a27693   x86_64: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 83ca14029531b9d549bb8df9f5aac525SHA-256: 450dd70148a25759d516bb7f9ee6864a8038221cd23cffa78dd4c97a6fcaf5b2 nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4976117843e939b48d8944c3d863c2b3SHA-256: 943076eece09883a2319211f72064bb9cbd3ca45ee8f0d754a58e0a91e38ea8b nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 45061cba17fae1dfe581a415d44773bfSHA-256: 72a6d9440442e9e6765d9f22877b72a83bfa00dcfe9a704b50e565f69795d1d3 nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e6937b5083bac59f1f9a23eeeb650f43SHA-256: 8076efffecd7eb91da1bb1115921bfd4b250e599597c1daeb920a9e620fa7550   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) 1310509 - CVE-2016-1950 nss: Heap buffer overflow vulnerability in ASN1 certificate parsing (MFSA 2016-35) These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:
Updated rabbitmq-server packages that fix two security issues and one bugare now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 5.0(Icehouse) for RHEL 7.Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate securityimpact.

Commo...
Updated rabbitmq-server packages that fix two security issues are nowavailable for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 5.0 (Icehouse)for RHEL 6.Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate securityimpact.

Common Vulnerabil...