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Security Update for Adobe Flash Player (3214628)Published: January 10, 2017Version: 1.0This security update resolves vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player when installed on all supported editions of Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows RT 8.1, Windows 10, and Windows Server 2016.This security update is rated Critical.

The update addresses the vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player by updating the affected Adobe Flash libraries contained within Internet Explorer 10, Internet Explorer 11, and Microsoft Edge.

For more information, see the Affected Software section.For more information about this update, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 3214628.This security update addresses the following vulnerabilities, which are described in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB17-02:CVE-2017-2925, CVE-2017-2926, CVE-2017-2927, CVE-2017-2928, CVE-2017-2930, CVE-2017-2931, CVE-2017-2932, CVE-2017-2933, CVE-2017-2934, CVE-2017-2935, CVE-2017-2936, CVE-2017-2937The following software versions or editions are affected.
Versions or editions that are not listed are either past their support life cycle or are not affected.

To determine the support life cycle for your software version or edition, see Microsoft Support Lifecycle. Operating System Component Aggregate Severity and Impact Updates Replaced*            Windows 8.1 Windows 8.1 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3214628) CriticalRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows 8.1 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3214628) CriticalRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 Windows Server 2012 Adobe Flash Player(3214628) ModerateRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows Server 2012 R2 Adobe Flash Player(3214628) ModerateRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows RT 8.1 Windows RT 8.1 Adobe Flash Player(3214628)[1] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows 10 Windows 10 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3214628)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows 10 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3214628)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows 10 Version 1511 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3214628)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows 10 Version 1511 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3214628)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows 10 Version 1607 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3214628)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows 10 Version 1607 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3214628)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 Windows Server 2016 Windows Server 2016 for 64-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3214628)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3209498 in MS16-154 [1]This update is available via Windows Update.[2]The Adobe Flash Player updates for Windows 10 updates are available via Windows Update or via the Microsoft Update Catalog.*The Updates Replaced column shows only the latest update in any chain of superseded updates.

For a comprehensive list of updates replaced, go to the Microsoft Update Catalog, search for the update KB number, and then view update details (updates replaced information is provided on the Package Details tab).How could an attacker exploit these vulnerabilities? In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer for the desktop, an attacker could host a specially crafted website that is designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker could also embed an ActiveX control marked "safe for initialization" in an application or Microsoft Office document that hosts the IE rendering engine.

The attacker could also take advantage of compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements.

These websites could contain specially crafted content that could exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email.In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer in the Windows 8-style UI, an attacker would first need to compromise a website already listed in the Compatibility View (CV) list.

An attacker could then host a website that contains specially crafted Flash content designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email.

For more information about Internet Explorer and the CV List, please see the MSDN Article, Developer Guidance for websites with content for Adobe Flash Player in Windows 8.Mitigation refers to a setting, common configuration, or general best-practice, existing in a default state, that could reduce the severity of exploitation of a vulnerability.

The following mitigating factors may be helpful in your situation:In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer for the desktop, an attacker could host a website that contains a webpage that is used to exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In addition, compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements could contain specially crafted content that could exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to visit these websites.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to visit the website, typically by getting them to click a link in an email message or Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website. Internet Explorer in the Windows 8-style UI will only play Flash content from sites listed on the Compatibility View (CV) list.

This restriction requires an attacker to first compromise a website already listed on the CV list.

An attacker could then host specially crafted Flash content designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email. By default, all supported versions of Microsoft Outlook and Windows Live Mail open HTML email messages in the Restricted sites zone.

The Restricted sites zone, which disables scripts and ActiveX controls, helps reduce the risk of an attacker being able to use any of these vulnerabilities to execute malicious code.
If a user clicks a link in an email message, the user could still be vulnerable to exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities through the web-based attack scenario. By default, Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 runs in a restricted mode that is known as Enhanced Security Configuration.

This mode can help reduce the likelihood of the exploitation of these Adobe Flash Player vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer. Workaround refers to a setting or configuration change that would help block known attack vectors before you apply the update.Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running You can disable attempts to instantiate Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer and other applications that honor the kill bit feature, such as Office 2007 and Office 2010, by setting the kill bit for the control in the registry. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. To set the kill bit for the control in the registry, perform the following steps: Paste the following into a text file and save it with the .reg file extension. Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system.You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy.

For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. Impact of workaround.

There is no impact as long as the object is not intended to be used in Internet Explorer. How to undo the workaround. Delete the registry keys that were added in implementing this workaround.  Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer through Group Policy Note The Group Policy MMC snap-in can be used to set policy for a machine, for an organizational unit, or for an entire domain.

For more information about Group Policy, visit the following Microsoft Web sites: Group Policy Overview What is Group Policy Object Editor? Core Group Policy tools and settings To disable Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer through Group Policy, perform the following steps: Note This workaround does not prevent Flash from being invoked from other applications, such as Microsoft Office 2007 or Microsoft Office 2010. Open the Group Policy Management Console and configure the console to work with the appropriate Group Policy object, such as local machine, OU, or domain GPO. Navigate to the following node:Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Internet Explorer -> Security Features -> Add-on Management Double-click Turn off Adobe Flash in Internet Explorer and prevent applications from using Internet Explorer technology to instantiate Flash objects. Change the setting to Enabled. Click Apply and then click OK to return to the Group Policy Management Console. Refresh Group Policy on all systems or wait for the next scheduled Group Policy refresh interval for the settings to take effect.  Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Office 2010 on affected systems Note This workaround does not prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. For detailed steps that you can use to prevent a control from running in Internet Explorer, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 240797.

Follow the steps in the article to create a Compatibility Flags value in the registry to prevent a COM object from being instantiated in Internet Explorer. To disable Adobe Flash Player in Office 2010 only, set the kill bit for the ActiveX control for Adobe Flash Player in the registry using the following steps: Create a text file named Disable_Flash.reg with the following contents: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\Common\COM\Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy.

For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Prevent ActiveX controls from running in Office 2007 and Office 2010 To disable all ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, including Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then select Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Impact of workaround. Office documents that use embedded ActiveX controls may not display as intended. How to undo the workaround. To re-enable ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then deselect Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Set Internet and Local intranet security zone settings to "High" to block ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting in these zones You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings for the Internet security zone to block ActiveX controls and Active Scripting. You can do this by setting your browser security to High. To raise the browsing security level in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options. In the Internet Options dialog box, click the Security tab, and then click Internet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High.

This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click Local intranet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High.

This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click OK to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note If no slider is visible, click Default Level, and then move the slider to High. Note Setting the level to High may cause some websites to work incorrectly.
If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites.

This will allow the site to work correctly even with the security setting set to High. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to blocking ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting. Many websites on the Internet or an intranet use ActiveX or Active Scripting to provide additional functionality.

For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use ActiveX Controls to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements.

Blocking ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites.
If you do not want to block ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting for such sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone".   Configure Internet Explorer to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone.

To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Internet Options on the Tools menu. Click the Security tab. Click Internet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click Local intranet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click OK to return to Internet Explorer, and then click OK again. Note Disabling Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zones may cause some websites to work incorrectly.
If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites.

This will allow the site to work correctly. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to prompting before running Active Scripting. Many websites that are on the Internet or on an intranet use Active Scripting to provide additional functionality.

For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use Active Scripting to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements. Prompting before running Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites. You will be prompted frequently when you enable this workaround.

For each prompt, if you feel you trust the site that you are visiting, click Yes to run Active Scripting.
If you do not want to be prompted for all these sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone".   Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone After you set Internet Explorer to require a prompt before it runs ActiveX controls and Active Scripting in the Internet zone and in the Local intranet zone, you can add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone.

This will allow you to continue to use trusted websites exactly as you do today, while helping to protect you from this attack on untrusted sites. We recommend that you add only sites that you trust to the Trusted sites zone. To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Tools, click Internet Options, and then click the Security tab. In the Select a web content zone to specify its current security settings box, click Trusted Sites, and then click Sites. If you want to add sites that do not require an encrypted channel, click to clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box. In the Add this website to the zone box, type the URL of a site that you trust, and then click Add. Repeat these steps for each site that you want to add to the zone. Click OK two times to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note Add any sites that you trust not to take malicious action on your system.

Two sites in particular that you may want to add are *.windowsupdate.microsoft.com and *.update.microsoft.com.

These are the sites that will host the update, and they require an ActiveX control to install the update. For Security Update Deployment information, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article referenced here in the Executive Summary.Microsoft recognizes the efforts of those in the security community who help us protect customers through coordinated vulnerability disclosure.
See Acknowledgments for more information.The information provided in the Microsoft Knowledge Base is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind. Microsoft disclaims all warranties, either express or implied, including the warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
In no event shall Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers be liable for any damages whatsoever including direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, loss of business profits or special damages, even if Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers have been advised of the possibility of such damages.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages so the foregoing limitation may not apply.V1.0 (January, 10 2017): Bulletin published. Page generated 2017-01-03 9:18Z-08:00.
Security Update for Adobe Flash Player (3209498)Published: December 13, 2016Version: 1.0This security update resolves vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player when installed on all supported editions of Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows RT 8.1, Windows 10, and Windows Server 2016.This security update is rated Critical.

The update addresses the vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player by updating the affected Adobe Flash libraries contained within Internet Explorer 10, Internet Explorer 11, and Microsoft Edge.

For more information, see the Affected Software section.For more information about this update, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 3209498.This security update addresses the following vulnerabilities, which are described in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB16-39:CVE-2016-7867, CVE-2016-7868, CVE-2016-7869, CVE-2016-7870, CVE-2016-7871, CVE-2016-7872, CVE-2016-7873, CVE-2016-7874, CVE-2016-7875, CVE-2016-7876, CVE-2016-7877, CVE-2016-7878, CVE-2016-7879, CVE-2016-7880, CVE-2016-7881, CVE-2016-7890, CVE-2016-7892The following software versions or editions are affected.
Versions or editions that are not listed are either past their support life cycle or are not affected.

To determine the support life cycle for your software version or edition, see Microsoft Support Lifecycle. Operating System Component Aggregate Severity and Impact Updates Replaced*            Windows 8.1 Windows 8.1 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3209498) CriticalRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows 8.1 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3209498) CriticalRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 Windows Server 2012 Adobe Flash Player(3209498) ModerateRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows Server 2012 R2 Adobe Flash Player(3209498) ModerateRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows RT 8.1 Windows RT 8.1 Adobe Flash Player(3209498)[1] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows 10 Windows 10 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3209498)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows 10 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3209498)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows 10 Version 1511 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3209498)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows 10 Version 1511 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3209498)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows 10 Version 1607 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3209498)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows 10 Version 1607 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3209498)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 Windows Server 2016 Windows Server 2016 for 64-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3209498)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3202790 in MS16-141 [1]This update is available via Windows Update.[2]The Adobe Flash Player updates for Windows 10 updates are available via Windows Update or via the Microsoft Update Catalog.Note The vulnerabilities discussed in this bulletin affect Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 5.

To be protected from the vulnerabilities, Microsoft recommends that customers running this operating system apply the current update, which is available exclusively from Windows Update.*The Updates Replaced column shows only the latest update in any chain of superseded updates.

For a comprehensive list of updates replaced, go to the Microsoft Update Catalog, search for the update KB number, and then view update details (updates replaced information is provided on the Package Details tab).How could an attacker exploit these vulnerabilities? In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer for the desktop, an attacker could host a specially crafted website that is designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker could also embed an ActiveX control marked "safe for initialization" in an application or Microsoft Office document that hosts the IE rendering engine.

The attacker could also take advantage of compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements.

These websites could contain specially crafted content that could exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email.In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer in the Windows 8-style UI, an attacker would first need to compromise a website already listed in the Compatibility View (CV) list.

An attacker could then host a website that contains specially crafted Flash content designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email.

For more information about Internet Explorer and the CV List, please see the MSDN Article, Developer Guidance for websites with content for Adobe Flash Player in Windows 8.Mitigation refers to a setting, common configuration, or general best-practice, existing in a default state, that could reduce the severity of exploitation of a vulnerability.

The following mitigating factors may be helpful in your situation:In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer for the desktop, an attacker could host a website that contains a webpage that is used to exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In addition, compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements could contain specially crafted content that could exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to visit these websites.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to visit the website, typically by getting them to click a link in an email message or Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website. Internet Explorer in the Windows 8-style UI will only play Flash content from sites listed on the Compatibility View (CV) list.

This restriction requires an attacker to first compromise a website already listed on the CV list.

An attacker could then host specially crafted Flash content designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email. By default, all supported versions of Microsoft Outlook and Windows Live Mail open HTML email messages in the Restricted sites zone.

The Restricted sites zone, which disables scripts and ActiveX controls, helps reduce the risk of an attacker being able to use any of these vulnerabilities to execute malicious code.
If a user clicks a link in an email message, the user could still be vulnerable to exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities through the web-based attack scenario. By default, Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 runs in a restricted mode that is known as Enhanced Security Configuration.

This mode can help reduce the likelihood of the exploitation of these Adobe Flash Player vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer. Workaround refers to a setting or configuration change that would help block known attack vectors before you apply the update.Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running You can disable attempts to instantiate Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer and other applications that honor the kill bit feature, such as Office 2007 and Office 2010, by setting the kill bit for the control in the registry. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. To set the kill bit for the control in the registry, perform the following steps: Paste the following into a text file and save it with the .reg file extension. Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system.You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy.

For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. Impact of workaround.

There is no impact as long as the object is not intended to be used in Internet Explorer. How to undo the workaround. Delete the registry keys that were added in implementing this workaround.  Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer through Group Policy Note The Group Policy MMC snap-in can be used to set policy for a machine, for an organizational unit, or for an entire domain.

For more information about Group Policy, visit the following Microsoft Web sites: Group Policy Overview What is Group Policy Object Editor? Core Group Policy tools and settings To disable Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer through Group Policy, perform the following steps: Note This workaround does not prevent Flash from being invoked from other applications, such as Microsoft Office 2007 or Microsoft Office 2010. Open the Group Policy Management Console and configure the console to work with the appropriate Group Policy object, such as local machine, OU, or domain GPO. Navigate to the following node:Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Internet Explorer -> Security Features -> Add-on Management Double-click Turn off Adobe Flash in Internet Explorer and prevent applications from using Internet Explorer technology to instantiate Flash objects. Change the setting to Enabled. Click Apply and then click OK to return to the Group Policy Management Console. Refresh Group Policy on all systems or wait for the next scheduled Group Policy refresh interval for the settings to take effect.  Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Office 2010 on affected systems Note This workaround does not prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. For detailed steps that you can use to prevent a control from running in Internet Explorer, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 240797.

Follow the steps in the article to create a Compatibility Flags value in the registry to prevent a COM object from being instantiated in Internet Explorer. To disable Adobe Flash Player in Office 2010 only, set the kill bit for the ActiveX control for Adobe Flash Player in the registry using the following steps: Create a text file named Disable_Flash.reg with the following contents: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\Common\COM\Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy.

For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Prevent ActiveX controls from running in Office 2007 and Office 2010 To disable all ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, including Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then select Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Impact of workaround. Office documents that use embedded ActiveX controls may not display as intended. How to undo the workaround. To re-enable ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then deselect Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Set Internet and Local intranet security zone settings to "High" to block ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting in these zones You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings for the Internet security zone to block ActiveX controls and Active Scripting. You can do this by setting your browser security to High. To raise the browsing security level in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options. In the Internet Options dialog box, click the Security tab, and then click Internet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High.

This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click Local intranet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High.

This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click OK to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note If no slider is visible, click Default Level, and then move the slider to High. Note Setting the level to High may cause some websites to work incorrectly.
If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites.

This will allow the site to work correctly even with the security setting set to High. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to blocking ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting. Many websites on the Internet or an intranet use ActiveX or Active Scripting to provide additional functionality.

For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use ActiveX Controls to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements.

Blocking ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites.
If you do not want to block ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting for such sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone".   Configure Internet Explorer to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone.

To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Internet Options on the Tools menu. Click the Security tab. Click Internet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click Local intranet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click OK to return to Internet Explorer, and then click OK again. Note Disabling Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zones may cause some websites to work incorrectly.
If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites.

This will allow the site to work correctly. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to prompting before running Active Scripting. Many websites that are on the Internet or on an intranet use Active Scripting to provide additional functionality.

For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use Active Scripting to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements. Prompting before running Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites. You will be prompted frequently when you enable this workaround.

For each prompt, if you feel you trust the site that you are visiting, click Yes to run Active Scripting.
If you do not want to be prompted for all these sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone".   Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone After you set Internet Explorer to require a prompt before it runs ActiveX controls and Active Scripting in the Internet zone and in the Local intranet zone, you can add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone.

This will allow you to continue to use trusted websites exactly as you do today, while helping to protect you from this attack on untrusted sites. We recommend that you add only sites that you trust to the Trusted sites zone. To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Tools, click Internet Options, and then click the Security tab. In the Select a web content zone to specify its current security settings box, click Trusted Sites, and then click Sites. If you want to add sites that do not require an encrypted channel, click to clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box. In the Add this website to the zone box, type the URL of a site that you trust, and then click Add. Repeat these steps for each site that you want to add to the zone. Click OK two times to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note Add any sites that you trust not to take malicious action on your system.

Two sites in particular that you may want to add are *.windowsupdate.microsoft.com and *.update.microsoft.com.

These are the sites that will host the update, and they require an ActiveX control to install the update. For Security Update Deployment information, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article referenced here in the Executive Summary.Microsoft recognizes the efforts of those in the security community who help us protect customers through coordinated vulnerability disclosure.
See Acknowledgments for more information.The information provided in the Microsoft Knowledge Base is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind. Microsoft disclaims all warranties, either express or implied, including the warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
In no event shall Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers be liable for any damages whatsoever including direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, loss of business profits or special damages, even if Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers have been advised of the possibility of such damages.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages so the foregoing limitation may not apply.V1.0 (December 13, 2016): Bulletin published. Page generated 2016-12-13 9:58Z-08:00.

Emerging technologies to feature at New Startup Alley, Cyber Security Zone and bigger AR/VR segment

SINGAPORE, 28 November 2016 – As Asia continues down the path of digital transformation and its cities get increasingly connected, CommunicAsia and EnterpriseIT 2017 will add brand new feature zones to address the growing need for data security and the budding startup culture in the region.
In addition, the event will also see a bigger augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) segment as the show grows to occupy the whole of Marina Bay Sands for the first time.

With the Cybersecurity Market Report predicting worldwide spending on cyber security to top US$1 trillion for the five-year period from 2017 to 2021, Asia seeing a record US$23.4 billion in startup funding in the second quarter of 2016[1], and worldwide revenues for the AR and VR market expected to reach US$162 billion in 2020[2], the new zones are timely additions to the event that will be held from 23 - 25 May 2017, at the Marina Bay Sands, Singapore.

Key trending technologies and network infrastructure that are the pillars of smart cities, businesses and lifestyles, such as borderless broadband, Internet of Things, cloud and data-centric solutions, satellite communications and enterprise mobility, will continue to be featured prominently at CommunicAsia and EnterpriseIT 2017.

“As cities and their populations become smarter and more connected, the amount of data they produce also increases.

As reported by Cisco Systems' latest Visual Networking Index, the Asia Pacific region will drive 45 per cent of the world's mobile data traffic by 2020, and global IP traffic will increase nearly threefold over the next five years with the number of devices connected to IP networks exceeding three times the global population during this same period,” said Victor Wong, Project Director for Communications Events at organiser Singapore Exhibition Services. “CommunicAsia and EnterpriseIT will provide first-hand access to the latest in constantly evolving technology and new disruptive innovations needed to ensure the sustainable growth of smart city ecosystems and the security of data that flows through them.”

Innovations at CommunicAsia and EnterpriseIT 2017
Exhibiting at NXT@CommunicAsia – the event’s showcase of transformative technology, is CryptoGuard, a Swedish developer of content protection.

The company, which has experienced substantial growth in recent years, will be demonstrating its DRM platform and new OTT solution CryptoLITE™ as well as its proven advanced CAS platform.

“We are expanding our markets with a strong focus in Asia, and having recently established a sales and support office in New Delhi, India, exhibiting at CommunicAsia seemed inevitable in our progress,” said Hannu Vunnel, Marketing Director at CryptoGuard. “We are looking forward to further strengthening our position in the Asian market, and at CommunicAsia2017, CryptoGuard hopes to be recognised by major players as a leading innovator for content security.”

In today’s volatile business climate, there is a pressing need for digital transformation across vertical industries.

The event puts a big focus on technology to enable smarter businesses, and allow visitors to learn about and source solutions that are aimed at improving efficiencies and revenue.

Also returning to CommunicAsia for the third time is Aarenet AG, which provides encrypted WebRTC audio and video conferencing in HD quality for telecom service providers.

The company will be introducing its enhanced Cloud PBX solutions including a Cloud Contact Centre, and a host of other enhancements to existing products and services.

“Aarenet AG first exhibited at CommunicAsia2015, where we received great success in business development activities for our company,” said Bao Vo, Regional Director at Aarenet AG. “We strongly believe that CommunicAsia is the premier infocomm tradeshow in the Asia Pacific region due to its excellent infrastructure in Singapore, its modern facilities, and the fact that the event attracts patrons from almost all carriers and telecom service providers regionally. We are looking forward to exhibit at CommunicAsia2017 and the new prospects it will bring.”

SatComm, which boasts Asia’s largest gathering of more than 160 satellite communications companies, is another integral part of the event.

Taking place on Level 1 of the Marina Bay Sands, SatComm will showcase satellite solutions that will enable upcoming technologies such as 4K and IoT to support smart city developments.

CommunicAsia2017 Summit
With the heightened pressure and push for seamless integration of technology, analytics and connectivity, the CommunicAsia2017 Summit is set to augment and ultimately revolutionise today’s entire ecosystem.

Taking place throughout the event, the Summit will cover topics such as the Internet of Things, Security of Things, Smart Cities, Digital Talent Analytics, and Broadband.

As usual, BroadcastAsia2017 will run alongside CommunicAsia2017, but at the refurbished Suntec Singapore.

This change in location will allow both shows to grow and accommodate even more exhibitors and technology. Regular shuttle buses will be available to transport visitors to and from both shows.

[1]https://www.techinasia.com/talk/asia-sees-record-high-234b-startup-funding-q2
[2]http://www.zdnet.com/article/virtual-and-augmented-reality-systems-poised-for-growth-spurt/

-ENDS-

Shows at a glance:

CommunicAsia2017 / EnterpriseIT2017 Exhibition

Incorporating:

SatComm2017

Date:

23 May – 25 May 2017, Tuesday to Thursday

Venue:

Basement 2, Level 1, 4 & 5 Marina Bay Sands, Singapore

Opening Hours:

10:30 am - 6:00 pm

Admission:

Business and trade professionals only

Website:

http://www.communicasia.com/ | http://www.enterpriseit-asia.com/

BroadcastAsia2017 Exhibition

Incorporating:

ProfessionalAudioTechnology2017

Date:

23 – 25 May, Tuesday - Thursday

Venue:

Level 4 & 6, Suntec Singapore

Opening Hours:

10:30 am - 6:00 pm

Admission:

Business and trade professionals only

Conferences at a glance:

BroadcastAsia2017 International Conference

Date:

23 – 25 May, Tuesday - Thursday

Venue:

Level 3, Suntec Singapore

Admission:

Registered delegates only


ABOUT SINGAPORE EXHIBITION SERVICES
Singapore Exhibitions Services organises a portfolio of international tradeshows serving the Communications, Engineering, Machinery and Lifestyle industries.
Its events consistently attract a high level of overseas participation with foreign exhibitors accounting for almost 80% of the show floor.
Singapore Exhibitions Services is a member of Allworld Exhibitions Alliance, a global network with over 50 offices worldwide.

For more information, please visit www.sesallworld.com.

MEDIA CONTACTS
REST OF THE WORLD

Kelly Mancaruso
Proactive PR
Tel: +441636 812 152
Email: Kelly.mancaruso@proactive-pr.com

ASIA
Patricia Yee
Singapore Exhibition Services
Tel: +65 6233 6637
Email: patricia.yee@sesallworld.com

Security Update for Adobe Flash Player (3202790)Published: November 8, 2016Version: 1.0This security update resolves vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player when installed on all supported editions of Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows RT 8.1, Windows 10, and Windows Server 2016.This security update is rated Critical.

The update addresses the vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player by updating the affected Adobe Flash libraries contained within Internet Explorer 10, Internet Explorer 11, and Microsoft Edge.

For more information, see the Affected Software section.For more information about this update, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 3202790.This security update addresses the following vulnerabilities, which are described in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB16-37:CVE-2016-7857, CVE-2016-7858, CVE-2016-7859, CVE-2016-7860, CVE-2016-7861, CVE-2016-7862, CVE-2016-7863, CVE-2016-7864, CVE-2016-7865The following software versions or editions are affected.
Versions or editions that are not listed are either past their support life cycle or are not affected.

To determine the support life cycle for your software version or edition, see Microsoft Support Lifecycle. Operating System Component Aggregate Severity and Impact Updates Replaced*            Windows 8.1 Windows 8.1 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3202790) CriticalRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows 8.1 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3202790) CriticalRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 Windows Server 2012 Adobe Flash Player(3202790) ModerateRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows Server 2012 R2 Adobe Flash Player(3202790) ModerateRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows RT 8.1 Windows RT 8.1 Adobe Flash Player(3202790)[1] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows 10 Windows 10 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3202790)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows 10 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3202790)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows 10 Version 1511 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3202790)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows 10 Version 1511 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3202790)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows 10 Version 1607 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3202790)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows 10 Version 1607 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3202790)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 Windows Server 2016 Windows Server 2016 for 64-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3202790)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3201860 in MS16-128 [1]This update is available via Windows Update.[2]The Adobe Flash Player updates for Windows 10 updates are available via Windows Update or via the Microsoft Update Catalog.Note The vulnerabilities discussed in this bulletin affect Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 5.

To be protected from the vulnerabilities, Microsoft recommends that customers running this operating system apply the current update, which is available exclusively from Windows Update.*The Updates Replaced column shows only the latest update in any chain of superseded updates.

For a comprehensive list of updates replaced, go to the Microsoft Update Catalog, search for the update KB number, and then view update details (updates replaced information is provided on the Package Details tab).How could an attacker exploit these vulnerabilities? In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer for the desktop, an attacker could host a specially crafted website that is designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker could also embed an ActiveX control marked "safe for initialization" in an application or Microsoft Office document that hosts the IE rendering engine.

The attacker could also take advantage of compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements.

These websites could contain specially crafted content that could exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email.In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer in the Windows 8-style UI, an attacker would first need to compromise a website already listed in the Compatibility View (CV) list.

An attacker could then host a website that contains specially crafted Flash content designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email.

For more information about Internet Explorer and the CV List, please see the MSDN Article, Developer Guidance for websites with content for Adobe Flash Player in Windows 8.Mitigation refers to a setting, common configuration, or general best-practice, existing in a default state, that could reduce the severity of exploitation of a vulnerability.

The following mitigating factors may be helpful in your situation:In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer for the desktop, an attacker could host a website that contains a webpage that is used to exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In addition, compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements could contain specially crafted content that could exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to visit these websites.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to visit the website, typically by getting them to click a link in an email message or Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website. Internet Explorer in the Windows 8-style UI will only play Flash content from sites listed on the Compatibility View (CV) list.

This restriction requires an attacker to first compromise a website already listed on the CV list.

An attacker could then host specially crafted Flash content designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email. By default, all supported versions of Microsoft Outlook and Windows Live Mail open HTML email messages in the Restricted sites zone.

The Restricted sites zone, which disables scripts and ActiveX controls, helps reduce the risk of an attacker being able to use any of these vulnerabilities to execute malicious code.
If a user clicks a link in an email message, the user could still be vulnerable to exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities through the web-based attack scenario. By default, Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 runs in a restricted mode that is known as Enhanced Security Configuration.

This mode can help reduce the likelihood of the exploitation of these Adobe Flash Player vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer. Workaround refers to a setting or configuration change that would help block known attack vectors before you apply the update.Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running You can disable attempts to instantiate Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer and other applications that honor the kill bit feature, such as Office 2007 and Office 2010, by setting the kill bit for the control in the registry. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. To set the kill bit for the control in the registry, perform the following steps: Paste the following into a text file and save it with the .reg file extension. Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system.You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy.

For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. Impact of workaround.

There is no impact as long as the object is not intended to be used in Internet Explorer. How to undo the workaround. Delete the registry keys that were added in implementing this workaround.  Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer through Group Policy Note The Group Policy MMC snap-in can be used to set policy for a machine, for an organizational unit, or for an entire domain.

For more information about Group Policy, visit the following Microsoft Web sites: Group Policy Overview What is Group Policy Object Editor? Core Group Policy tools and settings To disable Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer through Group Policy, perform the following steps: Note This workaround does not prevent Flash from being invoked from other applications, such as Microsoft Office 2007 or Microsoft Office 2010. Open the Group Policy Management Console and configure the console to work with the appropriate Group Policy object, such as local machine, OU, or domain GPO. Navigate to the following node:Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Internet Explorer -> Security Features -> Add-on Management Double-click Turn off Adobe Flash in Internet Explorer and prevent applications from using Internet Explorer technology to instantiate Flash objects. Change the setting to Enabled. Click Apply and then click OK to return to the Group Policy Management Console. Refresh Group Policy on all systems or wait for the next scheduled Group Policy refresh interval for the settings to take effect.  Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Office 2010 on affected systems Note This workaround does not prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. For detailed steps that you can use to prevent a control from running in Internet Explorer, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 240797.

Follow the steps in the article to create a Compatibility Flags value in the registry to prevent a COM object from being instantiated in Internet Explorer. To disable Adobe Flash Player in Office 2010 only, set the kill bit for the ActiveX control for Adobe Flash Player in the registry using the following steps: Create a text file named Disable_Flash.reg with the following contents: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\Common\COM\Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy.

For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Prevent ActiveX controls from running in Office 2007 and Office 2010 To disable all ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, including Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then select Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Impact of workaround. Office documents that use embedded ActiveX controls may not display as intended. How to undo the workaround. To re-enable ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then deselect Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Set Internet and Local intranet security zone settings to "High" to block ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting in these zones You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings for the Internet security zone to block ActiveX controls and Active Scripting. You can do this by setting your browser security to High. To raise the browsing security level in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options. In the Internet Options dialog box, click the Security tab, and then click Internet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High.

This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click Local intranet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High.

This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click OK to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note If no slider is visible, click Default Level, and then move the slider to High. Note Setting the level to High may cause some websites to work incorrectly.
If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites.

This will allow the site to work correctly even with the security setting set to High. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to blocking ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting. Many websites on the Internet or an intranet use ActiveX or Active Scripting to provide additional functionality.

For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use ActiveX Controls to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements.

Blocking ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites.
If you do not want to block ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting for such sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone".   Configure Internet Explorer to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone.

To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Internet Options on the Tools menu. Click the Security tab. Click Internet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click Local intranet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click OK to return to Internet Explorer, and then click OK again. Note Disabling Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zones may cause some websites to work incorrectly.
If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites.

This will allow the site to work correctly. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to prompting before running Active Scripting. Many websites that are on the Internet or on an intranet use Active Scripting to provide additional functionality.

For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use Active Scripting to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements. Prompting before running Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites. You will be prompted frequently when you enable this workaround.

For each prompt, if you feel you trust the site that you are visiting, click Yes to run Active Scripting.
If you do not want to be prompted for all these sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone".   Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone After you set Internet Explorer to require a prompt before it runs ActiveX controls and Active Scripting in the Internet zone and in the Local intranet zone, you can add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone.

This will allow you to continue to use trusted websites exactly as you do today, while helping to protect you from this attack on untrusted sites. We recommend that you add only sites that you trust to the Trusted sites zone. To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Tools, click Internet Options, and then click the Security tab. In the Select a web content zone to specify its current security settings box, click Trusted Sites, and then click Sites. If you want to add sites that do not require an encrypted channel, click to clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box. In the Add this website to the zone box, type the URL of a site that you trust, and then click Add. Repeat these steps for each site that you want to add to the zone. Click OK two times to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note Add any sites that you trust not to take malicious action on your system.

Two sites in particular that you may want to add are *.windowsupdate.microsoft.com and *.update.microsoft.com.

These are the sites that will host the update, and they require an ActiveX control to install the update. For Security Update Deployment information, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article referenced here in the Executive Summary.Microsoft recognizes the efforts of those in the security community who help us protect customers through coordinated vulnerability disclosure.
See Acknowledgments for more information.The information provided in the Microsoft Knowledge Base is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind. Microsoft disclaims all warranties, either express or implied, including the warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
In no event shall Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers be liable for any damages whatsoever including direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, loss of business profits or special damages, even if Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers have been advised of the possibility of such damages.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages so the foregoing limitation may not apply.V1.0 (November 8, 2016): Bulletin published. Page generated 2016-11-08 07:31-08:00.
Security Update for Adobe Flash Player (3201860)Published: October 27, 2016Version: 1.0This security update resolves a vulnerability in Adobe Flash Player when installed on all supported editions of Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows RT 8.1, and Windows 10.This security update is rated Critical.

The update addresses the vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player by updating the affected Adobe Flash libraries contained within Internet Explorer 10, Internet Explorer 11, and Microsoft Edge.

For more information, see the Affected Software section.For more information about this update, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 3201860.This security update addresses the following vulnerabilities, which are described in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB16-36:CVE-2016-7855The following software versions or editions are affected.
Versions or editions that are not listed are either past their support life cycle or are not affected.

To determine the support life cycle for your software version or edition, see Microsoft Support Lifecycle. Operating System Component Aggregate Severity and Impact Updates Replaced*            Windows 8.1 Windows 8.1 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3201860) CriticalRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 Windows 8.1 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3201860) CriticalRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 Windows Server 2012 Adobe Flash Player(3201860) ModerateRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 Windows Server 2012 R2 Adobe Flash Player(3201860) ModerateRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 Windows RT 8.1 Windows RT 8.1 Adobe Flash Player(3201860)[1] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 Windows 10 Windows 10 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3201860)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 Windows 10 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3201860)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 Windows 10 Version 1511 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3201860)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 Windows 10 Version 1511 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3201860)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 Windows 10 Version 1607 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3201860)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 Windows 10 Version 1607 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3201860)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3194343 in MS16-127 [1]This update is available via Windows Update.[2]The Adobe Flash Player updates for Windows 10 updates are available via Windows Update or via the Microsoft Update Catalog.Note The vulnerabilities discussed in this bulletin affect Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 5.

To be protected from the vulnerabilities, Microsoft recommends that customers running this operating system apply the current update, which is available exclusively from Windows Update.*The Updates Replaced column shows only the latest update in any chain of superseded updates.

For a comprehensive list of updates replaced, go to the Microsoft Update Catalog, search for the update KB number, and then view update details (updates replaced information is provided on the Package Details tab).How could an attacker exploit these vulnerabilities? In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer for the desktop, an attacker could host a specially crafted website that is designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker could also embed an ActiveX control marked "safe for initialization" in an application or Microsoft Office document that hosts the IE rendering engine.

The attacker could also take advantage of compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements.

These websites could contain specially crafted content that could exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email.In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer in the Windows 8-style UI, an attacker would first need to compromise a website already listed in the Compatibility View (CV) list.

An attacker could then host a website that contains specially crafted Flash content designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email.

For more information about Internet Explorer and the CV List, please see the MSDN Article, Developer Guidance for websites with content for Adobe Flash Player in Windows 8.Mitigation refers to a setting, common configuration, or general best-practice, existing in a default state, that could reduce the severity of exploitation of a vulnerability.

The following mitigating factors may be helpful in your situation:In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer for the desktop, an attacker could host a website that contains a webpage that is used to exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In addition, compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements could contain specially crafted content that could exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to visit these websites.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to visit the website, typically by getting them to click a link in an email message or Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website. Internet Explorer in the Windows 8-style UI will only play Flash content from sites listed on the Compatibility View (CV) list.

This restriction requires an attacker to first compromise a website already listed on the CV list.

An attacker could then host specially crafted Flash content designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email. By default, all supported versions of Microsoft Outlook and Windows Live Mail open HTML email messages in the Restricted sites zone.

The Restricted sites zone, which disables scripts and ActiveX controls, helps reduce the risk of an attacker being able to use any of these vulnerabilities to execute malicious code.
If a user clicks a link in an email message, the user could still be vulnerable to exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities through the web-based attack scenario. By default, Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 runs in a restricted mode that is known as Enhanced Security Configuration.

This mode can help reduce the likelihood of the exploitation of these Adobe Flash Player vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer. Workaround refers to a setting or configuration change that would help block known attack vectors before you apply the update.Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running You can disable attempts to instantiate Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer and other applications that honor the kill bit feature, such as Office 2007 and Office 2010, by setting the kill bit for the control in the registry. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. To set the kill bit for the control in the registry, perform the following steps: Paste the following into a text file and save it with the .reg file extension. Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system.You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy.

For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. Impact of workaround.

There is no impact as long as the object is not intended to be used in Internet Explorer. How to undo the workaround. Delete the registry keys that were added in implementing this workaround.  Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer through Group Policy Note The Group Policy MMC snap-in can be used to set policy for a machine, for an organizational unit, or for an entire domain.

For more information about Group Policy, visit the following Microsoft Web sites: Group Policy Overview What is Group Policy Object Editor? Core Group Policy tools and settings To disable Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer through Group Policy, perform the following steps: Note This workaround does not prevent Flash from being invoked from other applications, such as Microsoft Office 2007 or Microsoft Office 2010. Open the Group Policy Management Console and configure the console to work with the appropriate Group Policy object, such as local machine, OU, or domain GPO. Navigate to the following node:Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Internet Explorer -> Security Features -> Add-on Management Double-click Turn off Adobe Flash in Internet Explorer and prevent applications from using Internet Explorer technology to instantiate Flash objects. Change the setting to Enabled. Click Apply and then click OK to return to the Group Policy Management Console. Refresh Group Policy on all systems or wait for the next scheduled Group Policy refresh interval for the settings to take effect.  Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Office 2010 on affected systems Note This workaround does not prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. For detailed steps that you can use to prevent a control from running in Internet Explorer, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 240797.

Follow the steps in the article to create a Compatibility Flags value in the registry to prevent a COM object from being instantiated in Internet Explorer. To disable Adobe Flash Player in Office 2010 only, set the kill bit for the ActiveX control for Adobe Flash Player in the registry using the following steps: Create a text file named Disable_Flash.reg with the following contents: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\Common\COM\Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy.

For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Prevent ActiveX controls from running in Office 2007 and Office 2010 To disable all ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, including Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then select Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Impact of workaround. Office documents that use embedded ActiveX controls may not display as intended. How to undo the workaround. To re-enable ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then deselect Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Set Internet and Local intranet security zone settings to "High" to block ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting in these zones You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings for the Internet security zone to block ActiveX controls and Active Scripting. You can do this by setting your browser security to High. To raise the browsing security level in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options. In the Internet Options dialog box, click the Security tab, and then click Internet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High.

This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click Local intranet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High.

This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click OK to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note If no slider is visible, click Default Level, and then move the slider to High. Note Setting the level to High may cause some websites to work incorrectly.
If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites.

This will allow the site to work correctly even with the security setting set to High. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to blocking ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting. Many websites on the Internet or an intranet use ActiveX or Active Scripting to provide additional functionality.

For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use ActiveX Controls to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements.

Blocking ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites.
If you do not want to block ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting for such sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone".   Configure Internet Explorer to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone.

To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Internet Options on the Tools menu. Click the Security tab. Click Internet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click Local intranet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click OK to return to Internet Explorer, and then click OK again. Note Disabling Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zones may cause some websites to work incorrectly.
If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites.

This will allow the site to work correctly. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to prompting before running Active Scripting. Many websites that are on the Internet or on an intranet use Active Scripting to provide additional functionality.

For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use Active Scripting to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements. Prompting before running Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites. You will be prompted frequently when you enable this workaround.

For each prompt, if you feel you trust the site that you are visiting, click Yes to run Active Scripting.
If you do not want to be prompted for all these sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone".   Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone After you set Internet Explorer to require a prompt before it runs ActiveX controls and Active Scripting in the Internet zone and in the Local intranet zone, you can add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone.

This will allow you to continue to use trusted websites exactly as you do today, while helping to protect you from this attack on untrusted sites. We recommend that you add only sites that you trust to the Trusted sites zone. To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Tools, click Internet Options, and then click the Security tab. In the Select a web content zone to specify its current security settings box, click Trusted Sites, and then click Sites. If you want to add sites that do not require an encrypted channel, click to clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box. In the Add this website to the zone box, type the URL of a site that you trust, and then click Add. Repeat these steps for each site that you want to add to the zone. Click OK two times to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note Add any sites that you trust not to take malicious action on your system.

Two sites in particular that you may want to add are *.windowsupdate.microsoft.com and *.update.microsoft.com.

These are the sites that will host the update, and they require an ActiveX control to install the update. For Security Update Deployment information, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article referenced here in the Executive Summary.Microsoft recognizes the efforts of those in the security community who help us protect customers through coordinated vulnerability disclosure.
See Acknowledgments for more information.The information provided in the Microsoft Knowledge Base is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind. Microsoft disclaims all warranties, either express or implied, including the warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
In no event shall Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers be liable for any damages whatsoever including direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, loss of business profits or special damages, even if Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers have been advised of the possibility of such damages.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages so the foregoing limitation may not apply.V1.0 (October 26, 2016): Bulletin published. Page generated 2016-10-27 9:19Z-07:00.
Security Update for Adobe Flash Player (3194343)Published: October 11, 2016Version: 1.0This security update resolves vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player when installed on all supported editions of Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows RT 8.1, and Windows 10.This security update is rated Critical.

The update addresses the vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player by updating the affected Adobe Flash libraries contained within Internet Explorer 10, Internet Explorer 11, and Microsoft Edge.

For more information, see the Affected Software section.For more information about this update, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 3194343.This security update addresses the following vulnerabilities, which are described in Adobe Security Bulletin APSB16-32:CVE-2016-4273, CVE-2016-4286, CVE-2016-6981, CVE-2016-6982, CVE-2016-6983, CVE-2016-6984, CVE-2016-6985, CVE-2016-6986, CVE-2016-6987, CVE-2016-6989, CVE-2016-6990, CVE-2016-6991, CVE-2016-6992The following software versions or editions are affected.
Versions or editions that are not listed are either past their support life cycle or are not affected.

To determine the support life cycle for your software version or edition, see Microsoft Support Lifecycle. Operating System Component Aggregate Severity and Impact Updates Replaced*            Windows 8.1 Windows 8.1 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3194343) CriticalRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 Windows 8.1 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3194343) CriticalRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 Windows Server 2012 Adobe Flash Player(3194343) ModerateRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 Windows Server 2012 R2 Adobe Flash Player(3194343) ModerateRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 Windows RT 8.1 Windows RT 8.1 Adobe Flash Player(3194343)[1] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 Windows 10 Windows 10 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3194343)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 Windows 10 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3194343)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 Windows 10 Version 1511 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3194343)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 Windows 10 Version 1511 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3194343)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 Windows 10 Version 1607 for 32-bit Systems Adobe Flash Player(3194343)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 Windows 10 Version 1607 for x64-based Systems Adobe Flash Player(3194343)[2] CriticalRemote Code Execution 3188128 in MS16-117 [1]This update is available via Windows Update.[2]The Adobe Flash Player updates for Windows 10 updates are available via Windows Update or via the Microsoft Update Catalog.Note The vulnerabilities discussed in this bulletin affect Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 5.

To be protected from the vulnerabilities, Microsoft recommends that customers running this operating system apply the current update, which is available exclusively from Windows Update.*The Updates Replaced column shows only the latest update in any chain of superseded updates.

For a comprehensive list of updates replaced, go to the Microsoft Update Catalog, search for the update KB number, and then view update details (updates replaced information is provided on the Package Details tab).How could an attacker exploit these vulnerabilities? In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer for the desktop, an attacker could host a specially crafted website that is designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker could also embed an ActiveX control marked "safe for initialization" in an application or Microsoft Office document that hosts the IE rendering engine.

The attacker could also take advantage of compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements.

These websites could contain specially crafted content that could exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email.In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer in the Windows 8-style UI, an attacker would first need to compromise a website already listed in the Compatibility View (CV) list.

An attacker could then host a website that contains specially crafted Flash content designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email.

For more information about Internet Explorer and the CV List, please see the MSDN Article, Developer Guidance for websites with content for Adobe Flash Player in Windows 8.Mitigation refers to a setting, common configuration, or general best-practice, existing in a default state, that could reduce the severity of exploitation of a vulnerability.

The following mitigating factors may be helpful in your situation:In a web-based attack scenario where the user is using Internet Explorer for the desktop, an attacker could host a website that contains a webpage that is used to exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In addition, compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements could contain specially crafted content that could exploit any of these vulnerabilities.
In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to visit these websites.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to visit the website, typically by getting them to click a link in an email message or Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website. Internet Explorer in the Windows 8-style UI will only play Flash content from sites listed on the Compatibility View (CV) list.

This restriction requires an attacker to first compromise a website already listed on the CV list.

An attacker could then host specially crafted Flash content designed to exploit any of these vulnerabilities through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

An attacker would have no way to force users to view the attacker-controlled content.
Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to take action, typically by clicking a link in an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker's website, or by opening an attachment sent through email. By default, all supported versions of Microsoft Outlook and Windows Live Mail open HTML email messages in the Restricted sites zone.

The Restricted sites zone, which disables scripts and ActiveX controls, helps reduce the risk of an attacker being able to use any of these vulnerabilities to execute malicious code.
If a user clicks a link in an email message, the user could still be vulnerable to exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities through the web-based attack scenario. By default, Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 runs in a restricted mode that is known as Enhanced Security Configuration.

This mode can help reduce the likelihood of the exploitation of these Adobe Flash Player vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer. Workaround refers to a setting or configuration change that would help block known attack vectors before you apply the update.Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running You can disable attempts to instantiate Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer and other applications that honor the kill bit feature, such as Office 2007 and Office 2010, by setting the kill bit for the control in the registry. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. To set the kill bit for the control in the registry, perform the following steps: Paste the following into a text file and save it with the .reg file extension. Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system.You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy.

For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. Impact of workaround.

There is no impact as long as the object is not intended to be used in Internet Explorer. How to undo the workaround. Delete the registry keys that were added in implementing this workaround.  Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer through Group Policy Note The Group Policy MMC snap-in can be used to set policy for a machine, for an organizational unit, or for an entire domain.

For more information about Group Policy, visit the following Microsoft Web sites: Group Policy Overview What is Group Policy Object Editor? Core Group Policy tools and settings To disable Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer through Group Policy, perform the following steps: Note This workaround does not prevent Flash from being invoked from other applications, such as Microsoft Office 2007 or Microsoft Office 2010. Open the Group Policy Management Console and configure the console to work with the appropriate Group Policy object, such as local machine, OU, or domain GPO. Navigate to the following node:Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Internet Explorer -> Security Features -> Add-on Management Double-click Turn off Adobe Flash in Internet Explorer and prevent applications from using Internet Explorer technology to instantiate Flash objects. Change the setting to Enabled. Click Apply and then click OK to return to the Group Policy Management Console. Refresh Group Policy on all systems or wait for the next scheduled Group Policy refresh interval for the settings to take effect.  Prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Office 2010 on affected systems Note This workaround does not prevent Adobe Flash Player from running in Internet Explorer. Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. For detailed steps that you can use to prevent a control from running in Internet Explorer, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 240797.

Follow the steps in the article to create a Compatibility Flags value in the registry to prevent a COM object from being instantiated in Internet Explorer. To disable Adobe Flash Player in Office 2010 only, set the kill bit for the ActiveX control for Adobe Flash Player in the registry using the following steps: Create a text file named Disable_Flash.reg with the following contents: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\Common\COM\Compatibility\{D27CDB6E-AE6D-11CF-96B8-444553540000}] "Compatibility Flags"=dword:00000400 Double-click the .reg file to apply it to an individual system. Note You must restart Internet Explorer for your changes to take effect. You can also apply this workaround across domains by using Group Policy.

For more information about Group Policy, see the TechNet article, Group Policy collection. Prevent ActiveX controls from running in Office 2007 and Office 2010 To disable all ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, including Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then select Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Impact of workaround. Office documents that use embedded ActiveX controls may not display as intended. How to undo the workaround. To re-enable ActiveX controls in Microsoft Office 2007 and Microsoft Office 2010, perform the following steps: Click File, click Options, click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings. Click ActiveX Settings in the left-hand pane, and then deselect Disable all controls without notifications. Click OK to save your settings. Set Internet and Local intranet security zone settings to "High" to block ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting in these zones You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings for the Internet security zone to block ActiveX controls and Active Scripting. You can do this by setting your browser security to High. To raise the browsing security level in Internet Explorer, perform the following steps: On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options. In the Internet Options dialog box, click the Security tab, and then click Internet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High.

This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click Local intranet. Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High.

This sets the security level for all websites you visit to High. Click OK to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note If no slider is visible, click Default Level, and then move the slider to High. Note Setting the level to High may cause some websites to work incorrectly.
If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites.

This will allow the site to work correctly even with the security setting set to High. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to blocking ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting. Many websites on the Internet or an intranet use ActiveX or Active Scripting to provide additional functionality.

For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use ActiveX Controls to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements.

Blocking ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites.
If you do not want to block ActiveX Controls or Active Scripting for such sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone".   Configure Internet Explorer to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone You can help protect against exploitation of these vulnerabilities by changing your settings to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone.

To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Internet Options on the Tools menu. Click the Security tab. Click Internet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click Local intranet, and then click Custom Level. Under Settings, in the Scripting section, under Active Scripting, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK. Click OK to return to Internet Explorer, and then click OK again. Note Disabling Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zones may cause some websites to work incorrectly.
If you have difficulty using a website after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites.

This will allow the site to work correctly. Impact of workaround. There are side effects to prompting before running Active Scripting. Many websites that are on the Internet or on an intranet use Active Scripting to provide additional functionality.

For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use Active Scripting to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements. Prompting before running Active Scripting is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites. You will be prompted frequently when you enable this workaround.

For each prompt, if you feel you trust the site that you are visiting, click Yes to run Active Scripting.
If you do not want to be prompted for all these sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone".   Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone After you set Internet Explorer to require a prompt before it runs ActiveX controls and Active Scripting in the Internet zone and in the Local intranet zone, you can add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone.

This will allow you to continue to use trusted websites exactly as you do today, while helping to protect you from this attack on untrusted sites. We recommend that you add only sites that you trust to the Trusted sites zone. To do this, perform the following steps: In Internet Explorer, click Tools, click Internet Options, and then click the Security tab. In the Select a web content zone to specify its current security settings box, click Trusted Sites, and then click Sites. If you want to add sites that do not require an encrypted channel, click to clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box. In the Add this website to the zone box, type the URL of a site that you trust, and then click Add. Repeat these steps for each site that you want to add to the zone. Click OK two times to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer. Note Add any sites that you trust not to take malicious action on your system.

Two sites in particular that you may want to add are *.windowsupdate.microsoft.com and *.update.microsoft.com.

These are the sites that will host the update, and they require an ActiveX control to install the update. For Security Update Deployment information, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article referenced here in the Executive Summary.Microsoft recognizes the efforts of those in the security community who help us protect customers through coordinated vulnerability disclosure.
See Acknowledgments for more information.The information provided in the Microsoft Knowledge Base is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind. Microsoft disclaims all warranties, either express or implied, including the warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
In no event shall Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers be liable for any damages whatsoever including direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, loss of business profits or special damages, even if Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers have been advised of the possibility of such damages.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages so the foregoing limitation may not apply.V1.0 (October 11, 2016): Bulletin published. Page generated 2016-10-06 13:38-07:00.
London – July 26, 2016 – Skyscape Cloud Services Limited, the easy to adopt, easy to use and easy to leave assured cloud services company, has today announced the launch of its new cloud platform, based on Oracle’s Virtual Machine (OVM) technology.
Skyscape’s Oracle platform will ensure that its public sector customers can host their workloads on Skyscape’s secure platform, while meeting the stringent licencing and hardware requirements specified by Oracle’s software solutions.A wide variety of citizen-facing applications and UK public sector back office systems are based on Oracle’s database technology.

Traditionally these systems require dedicated hardware which not only involves initial capital investment but also poses a challenge in terms of flexibility and capacity management – if more capacity is required, so is more hardware which takes time and resource to put in place.

The very specific hardware and licencing requirements associated with Oracle solutions also make it difficult for public sector organisations to change hosting suppliers or deploy a diverse solution hosted across two platforms.
Skyscape’s new Oracle platform provides a solution to these problems.
Its customers can host their Oracle-based services with Skyscape and therefore realise the benefits of true cloud hosting – increased agility and consumption-based pricing as well as significantly reduced costs as the need for investment in hardware is removed.

All whilst complying with Oracle’s licencing requirements. “Our new Oracle Platform, which is built on OVM technology has been specifically designed with our commitment to the public sector in mind,” said Simon Hansford, CEO of Skyscape Cloud Services. “Our platform is used to deliver many critical services to citizens so it’s imperative that we continue to adapt to the evolving requirements of our public sector customers.

This new platform will respond to these demands from customers using Oracle technologies, helping us to continue to support the public sector in the digital transformation of public services, ultimately benefiting UK citizens and tax payers.” Matt Howell, Head of Public Sector at Capgemini said “We applaud the launch of Skyscape’s Oracle platform. While we have Oracle loads on the Skyscape platform, we observe a lag in cloud adoption amongst our public sector customers due to the lack of an assured platform designed specifically to meet the needs of Oracle applications.

As Skyscape’s new platform complies with Oracle licencing it will enable those customers to migrate services to the cloud quicker and with less risk.” The new Skyscape Oracle platform offers the same unique assurance, sovereignty and connectivity capabilities offered by Skyscape’s other platforms, all within an environment that is specifically optimised for Oracle workloads. Use of the Skyscape Oracle platform can enable organisations to prolong the lifecycle of existing applications by removing the reliance on legacy hardware. More importantly it can support further innovation across the public sector as it can be used to support projects that require high levels of security and assurance, combined with flexibility and scalability. Projects that can be up and running far quicker as test and development as well as production environments can be quickly established without the need to procure hardware. “We’re really excited about the development of Skyscape’s Oracle based platform” said Vikram Setia, Partner and Chief Commercial Officer at Infomentum. “As an Oracle platinum partner, we understand the complexities of successfully delivering Oracle solutions in the cloud – especially for customers who have specific requirements around data management and location.
Skyscape’s new Oracle based platform, and its sole focus on the requirements of the UK public sector, is great news for those looking to utilise a proven UK based cloud service provider to host their Oracle workloads.” Additional benefits of Skyscape’s Oracle platform include: Compatibility with a wide variety of Oracle technologies such as, but not exclusive to: Oracle Database, WebLogic, Fusion Applications, E-Business Suite and more Service Level Agreements that are sensitive to the requirements of Oracle applications Advanced Cross Domain Security Zone — a secure managed or self-managed area that enables citizen access over the internet to data which is securely hosted on the elevated domain Broad networking – connect via the internet (with DDoS protection provided as standard); via Government community networks (PSN Assured service, PSN Protected service, N3, Janet, RLI; or legacy networks including PNN) or via HybridConnect - ends – About Skyscape Cloud ServicesSkyscape’s assured cloud solutions have been specifically designed to meet the needs of the UK public sector, delivering UK sovereign services that are easy to adopt, easy to use and easy to leave, with genuine pay-by-the-hour consumption models.

As a UK SME, Skyscape has won a number of high-profile contracts via the G-Cloud Framework and through its large number of channel partners that embed Skyscape’s cloud platform in their solutions. Skyscape’s full range of services are Pan Government Accredited (PGA) up to IL3, hence suitable for all data at OFFICIAL (including OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE) and connected to government networks including the Public Services Network (PSN), the N3 health network and others.
Its services are delivered with leading technologies from the Skyscape Cloud Alliance Partners: QinetiQ, VMware, Cisco, EMC and Ark Data Centres. Skyscape has been named a “Cool Vendor” by analyst firm, Gartner.

To learn more about Skyscape, visit www.skyscapecloud.com or follow on twitter @skyscapecloud and LinkedIn: company/skyscape-cloud-services Media contactsStacey Nardozzi/Charlotte MartinFinn Partners020 3217 7060SkyscapeTeam@finnpartners.com
MV Tokitae.Bob JensenA man who pointed a high-powered blue laser at a Washington State Ferry last year has been ordered to pay a $100,000 civil penalty by the US Coast Guard in Seattle. The civil penalty was issued to Mark Raden of Freeland, Washington, who was determined by Coast Guard investigators to have shot a high-powered blue laser at the ferry Tokitae while it was on a run from Mukilteo to Clinton in October. Raden pointed the laser from the deck of another ship, the Kitsap, which was passing by the Tokitae. The laser hit the ferry master and first mate of the Tokitae, and the incident resulted in eye injuries to both men.

The chief mate's vision still hadn't recovered fully a week after the laser strike, according to statements by Washington State Ferry officials at the time. Raden is accused of "violating a safety and security zone" as well as interference with the safe operation of the Tokitae. The fine will be reviewed and finalized by a hearing officer in Arlington, Virginia. "Firing a laser at a vessel is extremely dangerous and directly interferes with the safe movement of commercial vessels and the Coast Guard’s ability to conduct search and rescue operations," said Joe Raymond, captain of the Port, Sector Puget Sound. "I encourage individuals who witness laser attacks on commercial vessels and Coast Guard small boats and aircraft to call 911." The October incident was the first laser strike to affect a Washington State Ferry. News reports said the suspect was caught because a deck hand on the Kitsap saw two men using the laser and identified them to the Washington State Patrol after the ferry docked. A $100,000 fine is nothing to sneeze at, but Raden may want to count himself lucky to only be facing a civil allegation.
In recent years, laser strikes against aircraft have increasingly led to criminal prosecutions and prison sentences.
A critical security flaw in Microsoft's Internet Explorer 8 has gone unfixed since October 2013, according to a new report by HP's Zero-Day Initiative. Although IE8 is five years old, it still holds a 20% share of the desktop browser market, according...
Microsoft Internet Explorer 8 contains a use-after-free vulnerability that can allow a remote,unauthenticated attacker to execute arbitrary code on a vulnerable system.
NEWS ANALYSIS: Even when a fix is developed for the latest IE threat, Windows XP users won't get it. That's a good reason for them to upgrade their OSes. A new vulnerability reported by Microsoft that allows an attacker to install malware and then execute it while bypassing the user's security is the best reason yet to move away from Windows XP if you're still among the millions of users who haven't moved to something newer. But the remote code execution vulnerability affects every version of Windows, and every version of Internet Explorer from version 6 through version 11. This vulnerability, which can be triggered by visiting an infected Website or opening an HTML email, is so serious that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's US-CERT (Computer Emergency Readiness Team) is recommending that you stop using IE entirely until Microsoft is able to fix the problem. This means that not only should you not browse the Internet using IE, but you should change your default settings so that clicking on a link doesn't open it and change your email settings so that HTML messages use a different browser. According to security researchers at FireEye, who found the vulnerability originally, it uses a previously known flash exploitation technique to allow code execution in portions of memory normally reserved for data. While the technique was known, the particular exploit method was not known until it was being employed to install malware. Fortunately, Microsoft has a workaround that is available for enterprise users—the Enhanced Mitigation Experience Tookkit, which is available for download. While the EMET will work with Windows XP, it does not provide a complete solution. With XP, the only real solution is to avoid running Internet Explorer. You should also set your security zone settings to "high." This will block ActiveX and Active Scripting, which in turn means that some Websites won't work properly. There are a number of other measures to help limit damage from this vulnerability. These are listed in the Microsoft security advisory in the first link at the top of this column. What Microsoft isn't saying is that you should avoid IE until a fix is released. For XP users, that fix will never come. While most of Microsoft's recommendations for workarounds will work, the fact is that they work at the price of reduced functionality. Some of the things you like to do on the Web won't work if you follow Microsoft's instructions, and you won't be able to get those things back. As support for XP erodes, so are the things you can use it for. Fortunately, you can do without IE. Other browsers still work with XP, and they're still being supported. That means that you should try Firefox or Chrome as alternatives when you need access to Web pages, especially if you're an XP user. For everyone else, you should still stop using IE for now. Fortunately, there is help. Symantec has released a batch file that unregisters a DLL file named VGX.DLL, which is needed to take advantage of the vulnerability. The batch file works on all modern versions of Windows and it will also help prevent other programs from reregistering VGX. The downside to using this fix from Symantec is that the programs that need it won't be able to use it and, as a result, also won't work.
Microsoft has issued a security warning about a zero-day vulnerability in its Internet Explorer browser, which attackers could exploit to gain the same user rights as the current user. This means that if the current user is logged on with administrative user rights, an attacker could take complete control of a targeted system. The attacker could then install programs and view, change or delete data as well as create new accounts with full user rights. Microsoft reported at the weekend that it is aware of limited, targeted attacks that attempt to exploit the vulnerability found in Internet Explorer (IE) versions 6 to 11. According to NetMarket Share, these versions of IE account for more than half of global browser market, affecting millions of businesses and consumers. But security firm FireEye said at the weekend that only IE versions 9, 10 and 11 were being actively targeted, which accounts for a quarter of the browser market. Independent security advisor Graham Cluley notes that Microsoft makes no mention of Windows XP in its security warning. “That’s not because it’s immune to attack. It’s because, Microsoft released its last ever security patches for Windows XP on 8 April 2014,” he wrote in a blog post. “As such, this is worth saying out loud: If you are still running Windows XP you will never receive a patch for this zero-day vulnerability,” he said. Microsoft warned that the vulnerability may corrupt memory in a way that could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code within IE. The company also said an attacker could host a specially crafted website that is designed to exploit this vulnerability through IE and then convince a user to view the website. This is typically done through sending messages through email or instant messenger that are designed to trick recipients into clicking a link to the malicious website. “On completion of this investigation, Microsoft will take the appropriate action to protect our customers, which may include providing a solution through our monthly security update release process, or an out-of-cycle security update,” Microsoft said. The company said it is working with partners in the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP) to provide information that they can use to provide broader protections to customers. Microsoft reports that more than 20 partners had released protections within 48 hours after the security advisory was published. Business users will enjoy some protection because, by default, IE on Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, and Windows Server 2012 R2 runs in a restricted mode that is known as Enhanced Security Configuration. This mode mitigates this vulnerability, Microsoft said. The company also said that by default, all supported versions of Microsoft Outlook, Microsoft Outlook Express, and Windows Mail open HTML email messages in the Restricted sites zone. The Restricted sites zone, which disables script and ActiveX controls, helps reduce the risk of an attacker being able to use this vulnerability to execute malicious code, the company said. However, if a user clicks a link in an email message, they could still be vulnerable to exploitation of this vulnerability through the web-based attack scenario. Because an attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the current user, users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than users who operate with administrative user rights. Microsoft suggests several steps to limit exposure the vulnerability until a fix is release. These include: Deploying the free Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) version 4.1 Setting Internet and Local intranet security zone settings to "High" to block ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting in these zones Configuring Internet Explorer to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone Modifying the Access Control List on VGX.DLL to be more restrictive Enabling Enhanced Protected Mode For Internet Explorer 11 and Enable 64-bit Processes for Enhanced Protected Mode Email Alerts Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox. By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy Read More Related content from ComputerWeekly.com RELATED CONTENT FROM THE TECHTARGET NETWORK