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Who needs to protect carriers or send Royal Marines shore anyway? UK Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon has denied that vital British warships may be quietly sold to South American nations as part of the ongoing defence review, according to reports.…
Today you'll see the price drop an extra 42% on Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands.

Experience total freedom of choice in Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands, the ultimate military shooter set in a massive open world setting.  The Santa Blanca drug cartel has transformed the beautiful South American country of Bolivia into a perilous narco-state, leading to lawlessness, fear, and rampant violence. With their corrosive influence growing, the cartel plagues the citizens of Bolivia but all hope is not lost.

The Ghosts, an elite US Special Forces team, are tasked to combat the cartel and save the country from collapse.  See the discounted Ghost Recon Wildlands on Amazon.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Today you'll see the price drop an extra 42% on Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands.

Experience total freedom of choice in Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands, the ultimate military shooter set in a massive open world setting.  The Santa Blanca drug cartel has transformed the beautiful South American country of Bolivia into a perilous narco-state, leading to lawlessness, fear, and rampant violence. With their corrosive influence growing, the cartel plagues the citizens of Bolivia but all hope is not lost.

The Ghosts, an elite US Special Forces team, are tasked to combat the cartel and save the country from collapse.  See the discounted Ghost Recon Wildlands on Amazon.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
”Prysmian Chile will allow the group to reinforce its position in the South American market,” declared M.

Del Brenna, CEO Prysmian Group South AmericaMilan, 26 January 2017– Prysmian Group, world leader in the energy and telecom cable systems industry, announces the establishment of its new Chilean affiliate, which is now fully operational.The South American market is experiencing growth in both the Energy and Telecom sectors, and Chile is one of the most promising markets in... Source: RealWire
Virtually, that is. Zeus trojan ported to bash Brazil banks Criminals are ramping up their online presence in Rio de Janeiro, where the Olympic Games will open on Friday, August 5 – with IBM and Fortinet reporting new banking trojans and cyber crime activity in Brazil. Big Blue has reported a variant of the Zeus trojan has emerged on crime forums targeting local banks and exploiting financial habits of users in the country in what is evidence the trojan is not a mere copy-and-paste effort. The Panda Banker trojan began in Europe and the US hitting banks in the region earlier this year before being ported to smash the home of the looming 2016 Olympics. The Brazilian variant targets 10 unnamed national banks and localised payment services and is being flogged by the original developers under a subscription payment model. Panda can also raid Bitcoin exchange credentials, airline loyalty programmes, prepaid cards and gambling sites, IBM X-Force researchers say. Its customisation continues: the trojan has been written to target a local security firm, a supermarket chain, and even law enforcement. Researchers suggest the possibly Russian-speaking designers are worked in concert with Brazil locals to develop the latest variant. "Panda grabs login credentials on the fly, is capable of injecting malicious code into ongoing web sessions to trick users with social engineering, and its operators are versed in the use of automated transaction panels," researchers say. "Panda’s operators’ favoured fraud methodology is account takeover, in which victim credentials are robbed and then used by the attacker to initiate a transaction from another device." Most infection comes via Word documents and poisoned macros with pop-up windows used to capture one-time banking passwords. Meanwhile Fortinet is warning of a huge 83 per cent spike in malicious domains and phishing URLs in Brazil across June compared to the global average of 16 per cent. Researchers with the company write in its latest threat report [PDF] that some 3,800 malicious government (gov.br) sites have spun up that target bureaucrats and Olympics officials. "As the 2016 Rio Olympics unfold, the history of increased attacks will undoubtedly continue and FortiGuard Labs is already seeing indicators of repeat techniques such as domain lookalikes for payment fraud and malicious websites or URLs targeting event and government officials," security strategist Ladi Adefala says. The findings are similar to those affecting previous major sporting events like the soccer World Cup and previous Olympic Games. In January Trend Micro found as part of its series of analysis on regional cybercrime markets that Brazil's underground was booming. Researchers at the firm said the South American nation had an "influx" of new criminals to its online communities who shirk anonymity when draining user bank accounts with malware and openly boast of their success. ® Sponsored: 2016 Cyberthreat defense report
Android mobe maker and Geeksphone fall out over debts It seems that the Blackphone, the handset created by Silent Circle and Spanish firm Geeksphone, isn't as popular as its makers would like. Geeksphone has sued [PDF] its erstwhile partner for $5m in a New York court, claiming that disappointing hardware sales have crippled the partnership and left the Switzerland-based Silent Circle owing it $5m plus interest.

According to letters entered as evidence at the end of last month, sales have been dismal and Silent Circle is now mired in debt and seeking funding. "The hardware business has proved to be a significant financial drain for Silent Circle," general counsel Matt Neiderman wrote [PDF] in a letter written in March. "Because of the large purchase orders that proved to be bogus, Silent Circle borrowed money to purchase inventory and parts ahead so that it would be able to deliver devices to meet the demand it believed it had, and focused most of its resources on preparing for the launch, marketing and sale of the Blackphone 2." The problem lay with partners, he said.
In 2015, the firm had signed up three partners – Dubai-based Big On Group, Korean firm Sumion and América Móvil in the South American continent.

Between them, the three had signed on to buy 250,000 Blackphones, but none had fulfilled their promises. Big On failed to secure a line of credit to buy the promised 25,000 handsets and dropped out of the deal, while Sumion appeared to be a vaporware company, with no assets or ability to trade.

América Móvil, meanwhile, appears to have severely overestimated demand and only purchased 6,000 phones, as opposed to the 100,000 it had projected it would buy that year. The problems were compounded by the fact that Silent Circle had – on the strength of the original contracts – invested heavily in staff for the regions, and in building up its hardware production facilities. Geeksphone is owed $5m because after it and Silent Circle formed a joint partnership, the Swiss firm offered to buy out its partner.

A sum of $30,750,000 was agreed, with Silent Circle paying an initial fee of $750,000, followed by a payment of $5m by April 30 2016, and an additional $25m when the shares were assigned to the firm. But no payment was made, and Silent Circle began to dispute Geeksphone's right to more funds.
In another letter [PDF], dated ten days after the April deadline, Neiderman accused Geeksphone of not putting sufficient work into the partnership and offloading its staffing costs onto the partnership unfairly. He also accused them of making fundamental errors in the design of the original Blackphone, stating that it used an inappropriate processor that had to be replaced in the second-generation phone. He also accused the head of Geeksphone of wildly overestimating the sales of Blackphone – predicting $750m in sales in 2015 when the actual figure was $10m. All this has left the Blackphone consortium mired in debt.

The court documents, surfaced on Wednesday by security journalist Tom Fox-Brewster, claim that a venture capitalist was due to invest $20m in the firm, but dropped out when it couldn't guarantee that it would be profitable in the next year and have no more debt. All-in-all it has been a very hard year for Silent Circle.
It has lost some key players, including CTO Jon Callas – who has rejoined Apple for the third time – and staff headcount is down around 15 per cent.

But the firm told The Register that this was pretty normal. "Some people have left for better opportunities as they have leveraged their experience at Silent Circle for jobs of greater responsibility. Love it," Vic Hyder, chief strategy officer, told El Reg. "Some positions were no longer required and terminated.
Some positions were consolidated from multiple people and salaries into one with the requisite experience. When you look at just those who left, it sounds like triage. When you look at the full picture, it's general maintenance of a business." ® Sponsored: 2016 Cyberthreat defense report