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In-the-wild exploits ramp up against high-impact sites using Apache Struts

Hackers are still exploiting the bug to install malware on high-impact sites.

Details emerge about mysterious Windows WPD driver

Overnight sleuthing by German Windows guru Günter Born has shed some light on the mysterious driver I talked about yesterday. We now know that the driver that appeared on many Windows 7, 8.1, and 10 systems wreaks havoc on USB connections for some smartphones, including Android and Lumia phones. Born writes in his blog that found the patch in the Windows Update Catalog—not an easy task given the catalog’s anemic search capabilities — and dug into the update file.

The “Microsoft - WPD - 2/22/2016 12:00:00 AM - 5.2.5326.4762” patch contains drivers for MediaTek Android devices. MediaTek, based in Taiwan, provides chips for a huge variety of phones.

This “new” driver is from Shenzhen Diadem Technology Co.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

MWC 2017: Zyxel to debut new premium LTE indoor gateway LTE5366

The LTE5366 provides superior Wi-Fi experiences with 11ac Wave 2 technology combined with LTE CAT6February 15, 2017 – Hsinchu, Taiwan – Zyxel Communications, a global leader in networking solutions and technologies, today announced it will launch its LTE gateway LTE5366 – one of the first LTE indoor gateways with 802.11ac Wave 2 Wi-Fi technology – at Mobile World Congress 2017. Zyxel’s LTE5366 brings ultra-fast mobile broadband connectivity to the home or office, while enhancing the... Source: RealWire

It’s Android Wear 2.0 launch day—here’s what’s getting updated

Google announces new hardware and updates with the new smartwatch OS.

Taiwan Brokerage Firms Receive DDoS Threats Demanding Ransom

Five brokerages in the country ignore demands to pay up $9,731 in Bitcoin or risk getting DDoS'ed.

Apple to start assembling iPhones in Bangalore by April

Apple plans to start assembling the iPhone in Bangalore by end April under a contract manufacturing arrangement with Taiwan’s Wistron.The move by the company comes even as it awaits approval from the federal government for some of its proposals for lowering the import duties on components and for creating an ecosystem of local manufacturers who can supply components for the smartphones, according to sources close to the situation.[ BYOD? Start here: A draft reimbursement policy for mobile users. | Keep up on key mobile developments and insights with the Mobile Tech Report newsletter. ]The Karnataka state, of which Bangalore is the capital, has announced Apple’s intentions to make the iPhone in the city.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

The “EyePyramid” attacks

On January 10, 2017, a court order was declassified by the Italian police, in regards to a chain of cyberattacks directed at top Italian government members and institutions. The attacks leveraged a malware named “EyePyramid” to target a dozen politicians, bankers, prominent freemasons and law enforcement personalities in Italy.

These included Fabrizio Saccomanni, the former deputy governor of the Bank of Italy, Piero Fassino, the former mayor of Turin, several members of a Masonic lodge, Matteo Renzi, former prime minister of Italy and Mario Draghi, another former prime minister of Italy and now president of the European Central Bank. The malware was spread using spear-phishing emails and the level of sophistication is low. However, the malware is flexible enough to grant access to all the resources in the victim’s computer. During the investigation, involved LEAs found more than 100 active victims in the server used to host the malware, as well as indications that during the last few years the attackers had targeted around 16,000 victims.

All identified victims are in Italy, most of them being Law Firms, Consultancy services, Universities and even Vatican Cardinals. Evidence found on the C&C servers suggests that the campaign was active since at least March 2014 and lasted until August 2016. However, it is suspected that the malware was developed and probably used years before, possibly as far back to 2008. Two suspects were arrested on January 10th, 2017 and identified as 45-year-old nuclear engineer Giulio Occhionero and his 47-year-old sister Francesca Maria Occhionero. Investigation Although the Italian Police Report doesn’t include malware hashes, it identified a number of C&C servers and e-mails addresses used by the malware for exfiltration of stolen data. Excerpt from the Italian court order on #EyePyramid(http://www.agi.it/pictures/pdf/agi/agi/2017/01/10/132733992-5cec4d88-49a1-4a00-8a01-dde65baa5a68.pdf) Some of the e-mail addresses used for exfiltration and C&C domains outlined by the police report follow: E-mail Addresses used for exfiltration gpool@hostpenta[.]com hanger@hostpenta[.]com hostpenta@hostpenta[.]com purge626@gmail[.]com tip848@gmail[.]com dude626@gmail[.]com octo424@gmail[.]com tim11235@gmail[.]com plars575@gmail[.]com Command-and-Control Servers eyepyramid[.]com hostpenta[.]com ayexisfitness[.]com enasrl[.]com eurecoove[.]com marashen[.]com millertaylor[.]com occhionero[.]com occhionero[.]info wallserv[.]com westlands[.]com Based on these indicators we’ve quickly written a YARA rule and ran it through our systems, in order to see if it matches any samples. Here’s how our initial “blind”-written YARA rule looked like: rule crime_ZZ_EyePyramid { meta: copyright = ” Kaspersky Lab”author = ” Kaspersky Lab”maltype = “crimeware”filetype = “Win32 EXE”date = “2016-01-11”version = “1.0” strings: $a0=”eyepyramid.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a1=”hostpenta.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a2=”ayexisfitness.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a3=”enasrl.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a4=”eurecoove.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a5=”marashen.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a6=”millertaylor.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a7=”occhionero.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a8=”occhionero.info” ascii wide nocase fullword$a9=”wallserv.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a10=”westlands.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a11=”217.115.113.181″ ascii wide nocase fullword$a12=”216.176.180.188″ ascii wide nocase fullword$a13=”65.98.88.29″ ascii wide nocase fullword$a14=”199.15.251.75″ ascii wide nocase fullword$a15=”216.176.180.181″ ascii wide nocase fullword$a16=”MN600-849590C695DFD9BF69481597241E-668C” ascii wide nocase fullword$a17=”MN600-841597241E8D9BF6949590C695DF-774D” ascii wide nocase fullword$a18=”MN600-3E3A3C593AD5BAF50F55A4ED60F0-385D” ascii wide nocase fullword$a19=”MN600-AD58AF50F55A60E043E3A3C593ED-874A” ascii wide nocase fullword$a20=”gpool@hostpenta.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a21=”hanger@hostpenta.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a22=”hostpenta@hostpenta.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$a23=”ulpi715@gmx.com” ascii wide nocase fullword$b0=”purge626@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b1=”tip848@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b2=”dude626@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b3=”octo424@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b4=”antoniaf@poste.it” ascii wide fullword$b5=”mmarcucci@virgilio.it” ascii wide fullword$b6=”i.julia@blu.it” ascii wide fullword$b7=”g.simeoni@inwind.it” ascii wide fullword$b8=”g.latagliata@live.com” ascii wide fullword$b9=”rita.p@blu.it” ascii wide fullword$b10=”b.gaetani@live.com” ascii wide fullword$b11=”gpierpaolo@tin.it” ascii wide fullword$b12=”e.barbara@poste.it” ascii wide fullword$b13=”stoccod@libero.it” ascii wide fullword$b14=”g.capezzone@virgilio.it” ascii wide fullword$b15=”baldarim@blu.it” ascii wide fullword$b16=”elsajuliette@blu.it” ascii wide fullword$b17=”dipriamoj@alice.it” ascii wide fullword$b18=”izabelle.d@blu.it” ascii wide fullword$b19=”lu_1974@hotmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b20=”tim11235@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b21=”plars575@gmail.com” ascii wide fullword$b22=”guess515@fastmail.fm” ascii wide fullword condition: ((uint16(0) == 0x5A4D)) and (filesize < 10MB) and((any of ($a*)) or (any of ($b*)) )} To build the YARA rule above we’ve used every bit of existing information, such as custom e-mail addresses used for exfiltration, C&C servers, licenses for the custom mailing library used by the attackers and specific IP addresses used in the attacks. Once the YARA rule was ready, we’ve ran it on our malware collections.

Two of the initial hits were: MD5 778d103face6ad7186596fb0ba2399f2 File size 1396224 bytes Type Win32 PE file Compilation Timestamp Fri Nov 19 12:25:00 2010 MD5 47bea4236184c21e89bd1c1af3e52c86 File size 1307648 bytes Type Win32 PE file Compilation timestamp Fri Sep 17 11:48:59 2010 These two samples allowed us to write a more specific and more effective YARA rule which identified 42 other samples in our summary collections. At the end of this blogpost we include a full list of all related samples identified. Although very thorough, the Police Report does not include any technical details about how the malware was spread other than the use of spear phishing messages with malicious attachments using spoofed email addresses. Nevertheless, once we were able to identify the samples shown above we used our telemetry to find additional ones used by the attackers for spreading the malware in spear-phishing emails.

For example: From: Di Marco GianmariaSubject: ricezione e attivazioneTime:2014/01/29 13:57:42Attachment: contatto.zip//Primarie.accdb (…) .exe From: Michelangelo GiorgianniSubject: R: Re: CONVOCAZIONE]Time: 2014/01/28 17:28:56]Attachment: Note.zip//sistemi.pdf (…) .exe Other attachment filenames observed in attacks include: Nuoveassunzioni.7z Assunzione.7z Segnalazioni.doc (…) 7z.exe Regione.7z Energy.7z Risparmio.7z Pagati.7z Final Eight 2012 Suggerimenti Uso Auricolari.exe Fwd Re olio di colza aggiornamento prezzo.exe Approfondimento.7z Allegato.zip Eventi.bmp (…) .exe Quotidiano.mdb (…) _7z.exe Notifica operazioni in sospeso.exe As can be seen the spreading relied on spearphishing e-mails with attachments, which relied on social engineering to get the victim to open and execute the attachment.

The attachments were ZIP and 7zip archives, which contained the EyePyramid malware. Also the attackers relied on executable files masking the extension of the file with multiple spaces.

This technique is significant in terms of the low sophistication level of this attack. High profile victims Potential high-profile Italian victims (found as recipients of spear-phishing emails according to the police report) include very relevant Italian politicians such as Matteo Renzi or Mario Draghi. It should be noted however there is no proof than any of them got successfully infected by EyePyramid – only that they were targeted. Of the more than 100 active victims found in the server, there’s a heavy interest in Italian law firms and lawyers.

Further standout victims, organizations, and verticals include: Professional firms, Consultants Universities Vaticano Construction firms Healthcare Based on the KSN data for the EyePyramid malware, we observed 92 cases in which the malware was blocked, of which the vast majority (80%) of them were in Italy. Other countries where EyePyramid has been detected includes France, Indonesia, Monaco, Mexico, China, Taiwan, Germany and Poland. Assuming their compilation timestamp are legit – and they do appear correct, most of the samples used in the attacks have been compiled in 2014 and 2015. Conclusions Although the “EyePyramid” malware used by the two suspects is neither sophisticated nor very hard to detect, their operation successfully compromised a large number of victims, including high-profile individuals, resulting in the theft of tens of gigabytes of data. In general, the operation had very poor OPSEC (operational security); the suspects used IP addresses associated with their company in the attacks, discussed the victims using regular phone calls and through WhatsApp and, when caught, attempted to delete all the evidence. This indicates they weren’t experts in the field but merely amateurs, who nevertheless succeeded in stealing considerably large amounts of data from their victims. As seen from other known cyberespionage operations, it’s not necessary for the attackers to use high profile malware, rootkits, or zero-days to run long-standing cyberespionage operations. Perhaps the most surprising element of this story is that Giulio Occhionero and Francesca Maria Occhionero ran this cyber espionage operation for many years before getting caught. Kaspersky Lab products successfully detect and remove EyePyramid samples with these verdicts: HEUR:Trojan.Win32.Generic Trojan.Win32.AntiAV.choz Trojan.Win32.AntiAV.ciok Trojan.Win32.AntiAV.cisb Trojan.Win32.AntiAV.ciyk not-a-virus:HEUR:PSWTool.Win32.Generic not-a-virus:PSWTool.Win32.NetPass.aku A full report #EyePyramid, including technical details of the malware, is available to customers of Kaspersky APT Intelligence Services.

Contact: intelreports (at) kaspersky [dot] com
. To learn how to write YARA rules like a GReAT Ninja, consider taking a master class at Security Analyst Summit. – https://sas.kaspersky.com/#trainings References and Third-Party Articles Indicators of Compromise Hashes: 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 Related hashes identified by @GaborSzappanos: 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 Backdoor Filenames: pnbwz.exepxcfx.exeqislg.exerqklt.exerunwt.exeruzvs.exervhct.exevidhdw.exewinlng.exewxrun.exexddrv.exexdwdrv.exe Malicious attachments filenames (weak indicators): contatto.zip//Primarie.accdb (…) .exeNote.zip//sistemi.pdf (…) .exeNuoveassunzioni.7zAssunzione.7zSegnalazioni.doc (…) 7z.exeRegione.7zEnergy.7zRisparmio.7zPagati.7zFinal Eight 2012 Suggerimenti Uso Auricolari.exeFwd Re olio di colza aggiornamento prezzo.exeApprofondimento.7zAllegato.zipEventi.bmp (…) .exeQuotidiano.mdb (…) _7z.exe

Cybersecurity Expert Links Taiwan And Europe ATM Hacks

Group-IB says both attacks were likely carried out by Cobalt group using malware "ATM spitter." Cybersecurity firm Group-IB has linked the July Taiwan ATM cyber heist to the ATM hacking spree in Europe last year, claiming the two were carried out by the same hacking group, dubbed Cobalt. Reuters reports that Group-IB’s conclusion is based on the fact that the hack technique used in both incidents match. A group of 22 foreign nationals are alleged to be behind the First Commercial Bank ATM hack in Taiwan, of which three Eastern Europeans are in custody. Most of the stolen money was recovered and Taiwan authorities believe the bank network was breached at a London branch. According to a Group-IB report, the hackers used malware “ATM spitter” in the Taiwan attack as well as in similar hacks carried out in Britain, Russia, Poland, Spain, Bulgaria, and many other European countries, Reuters adds. Click here for the full story. Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events.

For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article.
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Unsecure routers, webcams prompt feds to sue D-Link

Tolbxelareader comments 38 Share this story The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday sued Taiwan-based D-link in federal court.

The FTC alleges that D-link routers and webcams left "thousands of consumers at risk" to hacking attacks. "Defendants have failed to take reasonable steps to protect their routers and IP cameras from widely known and reasonably foreseeable risks of unauthorized access, including by failing to protect against flaws which the Open Web Application Security Project has ranked among the most critical and widespread web application vulnerabilities since at least 2007," the FTC said in a complaint (PDF) filed in San Francisco federal court. The commission's move comes 11 months after the agency settled with Asus over its insecure routers that allowed attackers to remotely log in to them and, depending on user configurations, change security settings or access files stored on connected devices. The government lodged similar allegations against D-Link: Defendants repeatedly have failed to take reasonable software testing and remediation measures to protect their routers and IP cameras against well-known and easily preventable software security flaws, such as “hard-coded” user credentials and other backdoors, and command injection flaws, which would allow remote attackers to gain control of consumers’ devices; Defendant D-Link has failed to take reasonable steps to maintain the confidentiality of the private key that Defendant D-Link used to sign Defendants’ software, including by failing to adequately restrict, monitor, and oversee handling of the key, resulting in the exposure of the private key on a public website for approximately six months; and Defendants have failed to use free software, available since at least 2008, to secure users’ mobile app login credentials, and instead have stored those credentials in clear, readable text on a user’s mobile device. Reports abound about D-Link and other products being compromised with botnets and other attacks. Now the company stands accused of unfair business practices and misrepresenting its security features.

The government wants a federal judge to order D-Link to correct those alleged business practices.

China gives America its underwater drone back – with a warning

Should have thrown in a dictionary, too, for Trump The Chinese government has handed back to America the US Navy underwater drones it stole last week. The Seaglider submersible was scooped out of the ocean by a Chinese military vessel shadowing the USNS Bowditch in the South China Sea. The drone, one of hundreds of autonomous vehicles the US Navy uses to track currents and water salinity, was causing a hazard to shipping – according to the Chinese. The ensuing diplomatic incident led president-elect Donald Trump to issue a 4.30am tweet decrying the action.

Trump was so annoyed he forgot how to spell – or created a new word to add to his bigly vocabulary. A message from the soon-to-be leader of the free world The Donald later tweeted again, telling China to keep the drone. After a round or three of negotiations, the Chinese have now given the unmanned underwater vehicle back to sailors on the USS Mustin at a meeting approximately 50 nautical miles northwest of Subic Bay, Philippines. "This incident was inconsistent with both international law and standards of professionalism for conduct between navies at sea," said Pentagon press secretary Peter Cook. "The US has addressed those facts with the Chinese through the appropriate diplomatic and military channels, and have called on Chinese authorities to comply with their obligations under international law and to refrain from further efforts to impede lawful US activities." The Navy will now investigate the drone to see if it has been tampered with and will be issuing a further report on the state of the equipment.

Cook said the US would continue operating in the South China Sea as it always had. The incident was seen by many as a response to Trump's acceptance of a phone call from the Taiwanese premier.

This was seen as an insult by the Middle Kingdom because it broke the "One China" policy, whereby countries deal with either China or Taiwan – but not both. Chinese Defense Ministry spokesperson Yang Yujun said that his government has examined the initially "unidentified device," and decided to return it. He said the US's "unilateral move to dramatize the issue in the process is inappropriate" and hadn't helped. "We regret that," Yang said, state media reports. He added that the US Navy had frequently invaded Chinese waters to carry out reconnaissance and military surveys, despite Chinese protests. "China resolutely opposes these activities, and demands that the U.S. side should stop such activities," he said. "China will continue to be vigilant against the relevant activities on the U.S. side, and will take necessary measures in response." ® Sponsored: Next gen cybersecurity.
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Notes from HITCON Pacific 2016

Hacks in Taiwan Conference (HITCON) Pacific 2016 was held in Taipei city, Taiwan from the 27th of November to the 3rd of December this year.

The concept of this event is about “The Fifth Domain: Cyber | Homeland Security”.

This HITCON Pacific 2016 is more formal event than HITCON Community 2016 which we attended last summer.. More than 500 participants from around the world attended the event, which included technical trainings, security conference and capture the flag (CTF) competition. We met many high-skilled malware analysts, incident responders, security researchers and professionals at this event to discuss some of the most recent topics in the field of cybersecurity: Ransomware, ATM hacking, IoT security, machine leaning and targeted attacks.

Based on our experience, this event is one of the brightest international security conferences in Asia-Pacific region. One of the organizers, Mr.
Sung-ting Tsai, opened the conference with the following words: “HITCON is not only running community and technical topics, in HITCON Pacific we are also concerned about the strategic and operational issues. HITCON Pacific is providing an international platform to connect and collaborate with enterprises, governments, vendors and security experts, especially in Asia Pacific region.” The conference has been recognized by the local government. One of the most honorable keynote speakers of this event was the president of Taiwan, Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文).

To our knowledge it’s the first time ever, a president of a country or region comes to do the opening speech at information security conference.
Such special attention of the president reflects Taiwanese government concerns about improving cybersecurity in Taiwan and the whole Asia Pacific region.
She said during her keynote speech: “The spirit of hacking culture is in stepping out of tradition and fighting against the present situation.

Governmental organizations need such spirit to cultivate innovation”. Two speakers from Global Research and Analysis Team (GReAT) of Kaspersky Lab also presented on the same stage: Vitaly Kamluk and Suguru Ishimaru (that’s me). Vitaly talked about Yara techniques with some of the most remarkable stories, including finding 0-day exploits in Microsoft Silverlight.
Surprisingly for the organizers and the audience Vitaly presented with 0 slides during his 40 minutes talk.

All the contents he showed was Yara tool output in a terminal session, which looked like live demo but with nice ASCII art and dynamic transition effects. His presentation style was very innovative and widely discussed after his speech. I attended Hitcon Community conference earlier this year and liked the conference so much that I decided to come again as a speaker. Needless to say it was challenging for me, because I have never presented on such large stage outside of Japan before.

Also, I had to present in English, which is not my native language and isn’t my strongest skill. I talked about malware discovered in targeted attacks which focused on Taiwan and Japan. My talk was titled “Why corrupted samples in recent APTs?”.

The talk covered some of the new techniques that were used to prevent automated malware analysis, resulting in erroneous marking of the samples as corrupted.
I showed a live demo of such samples, which would cause system exception on any system except the system of the victim. We had a chance to attend many other rgreat talks by security researchers.
Some of the talks we liked included: Ryan Olson from Palo Alto Networks, who talked about “Target Identification through Decoy File Analysis”, Takahiro Haruyama from Symantec who made a presentation about “Winnti Polymorphism”, Kyoung-Ju Kwak from Financial Security Institute, with his talk “Fly me to the BLACKMOON”, and Philippe Lin and Ricky Chou from Trendmicro, who talked about “Experience of Microsoft Malware Classification Challenge”. You can download the slides and agenda from official website of HITCON Pacific 2016. In conclusion, HITCON Pacific 2016 was fantastic event and I definitely recommend it to all the people who would like to explore cybersecurity arena in Asia Pacific.

The organizers kindly offered free simultaneous translation from/to Chinese which built a unique bridge between rather closed Chinese speaking security community and the rest of the world.

For me personally this time was a very meditative thing: my first challenge of presenting at international conference in English, an honor of meeting the president and delivering a talk on the same stage.

Don’t panic, friends, but the Chinese navy just nicked one of...

Uncle Sam would like it back, please, pronto A diplomatic incident is brewing after US defense officials accused a Chinese warship of filching one of America's robotic submersibles. We're told the Seaglider underwater drone was being picked up by the USNS Bowditch in the South China Sea after it surfaced for collection.

As the US naval oceanographic vessel went to retrieve it, a Chinese ship that had been shadowing the Americans lowered a boat and grabbed it themselves. In a statement to The Register on Friday, Pentagon press secretary Peter Cook said: Using appropriate government-to-government channels, the Department of Defense has called upon China to immediately return an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) that China unlawfully seized on December 15 in the South China Sea while it was being recovered by a US Navy oceanographic survey ship. The USNS Bowditch (T-AGS 62) and the UUV – an unclassified "ocean glider" system used around the world to gather military oceanographic data such as salinity, water temperature, and sound speed – were conducting routine operations in accordance with international law about 50 nautical miles northwest of Subic Bay, Philippines, when a Chinese Navy PRC DALANG III-Class ship (ASR-510) launched a small boat and retrieved the UUV. Bowditch made contact with the PRC Navy ship via bridge-to-bridge radio to request the return of the UUV.

The radio contact was acknowledged by the PRC Navy ship, but the request was ignored.

The UUV is a sovereign immune vessel of the United States. We call upon China to return our UUV immediately, and to comply with all of its obligations under international law. Seaglider drones are used to monitor ocean currents, water salinity, and other readings by oceanographers around the world.

They are capable of long-duration missions thanks for a novel propulsion system that uses wings on the side of the craft and small changes in buoyancy to provide forward impetus. There's unlikely to be any classified technology on the submersible – the basic design is well known and the Bowditch is largely staffed by civilians. We've asked the US Department of Defense for further comment on this.
In any case, the theft on Thursday by the Chinese will worsen a deteriorating diplomatic situation between the US and the Middle Kingdom. “This looks like signaling from the Chinese in response to Trump’s Taiwan call,” said Bonnie Glaser, the director of the China Power Project at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies. “It is hard to believe this is the action of an independent commander.

The Chinese now have much better control over the military, particularly the navy.
It is in China’s interest to send signals before Trump is inaugurated, so that he gets the message and be more restrained once he is office.” Don't hold your breath on that score. ® Sponsored: Want to know more about PAM? Visit The Register's hub