6 C
London
Monday, November 20, 2017
Home Tags Technology strategy

Tag: technology strategy

Ministry of Defence assures us it has coherent plan to harness Brit boffinry The Ministry of Defence has unveiled latest its science and technology strategy by writing a jargon-ridden report full of incomprehensible diagrams – but it contains good news...
Security teams must get better at catching intruders where we have the advantage: on our own networks. The Russians spent a year inside the Democratic National Committee before they were discovered.
It took five months for OPM to catch the thieves that stole the records of more than four million federal employees.
Intruders broke into Yahoo’s systems in 2013, and we don’t even know how long they were inside; Yahoo only discovered the hack when stolen data turned up for sale on the dark web. We invest more and more in our security, but the breaches just get bigger. How many more times does this have to happen before we accept that what we’re doing isn’t working?Earlier this month, during a Senate Armed Service Committee hearing, Admiral Michael S. Rogers, the director of the National Security Agency, told us what we need to do to fix the problem, recognizing two different kinds of cybersecurity: Keeping intruders out of networks. Identifying, containing, and ejecting them once they get inside. We must be able to do both, Admiral Rogers argued, noting that there is an entirely “different thought process, methodology, prioritization, and risk approach to dealing with someone who is already in your network versus trying to keep them out in the first place.”The head of the best offensive agency in the world is telling us exactly what we’re missing, but we aren’t listening. Most organizations still focus heavily on keeping attackers out, rather than trying to catch the ones that get in. A common bit of security wisdom is that hackers have the advantage because they only need to be right once to get in.

This is largely true today - hackers can launch assault after assault to try to break through your defenses, probing for a weakness until you slip.

And every security team, no matter how good, slips up eventually.

But once inside, the intruders are in your network - unfriendly territory.

They have to hide inside your environment, and they only have to slip up once to get caught.Consider the White House, one of the most secure buildings on the planet. Jumping the wrought iron fence on Pennsylvania Avenue isn’t the challenge.

The challenge is dealing with the Secret Service agents that tackle you as soon as your feet hit the lawn.

Cybersecurity teams should play to our strengths, and follow the example of both Admiral Rogers and the Secret Service. We should always work to keep intruders out, but some will always get in. We should heavily invest where we have the advantage: on our own networks. Image Source: By: Orhan Cam via Shutterstock At the White House, it is the Secret Service’s visibility and control inside the grounds that shuts down intruders.

Crossing that lawn is exposed, and the Secret Service detects intruders in seconds.

Access within the compound is limited to only where you need to go for purposes of your meeting, so visitors that step out of bounds are easy to spot.

And once an intruder is detected, there is almost always an agent nearby, with a wide range of tools at their disposal to contain the intrusion.

This is the essence of the defender’s advantage: visibility linked with control means that intruders are at a huge disadvantage once they get in.Unfortunately, we have largely ceded this advantage on our networks.
Security teams often don’t know what devices are connected, or how those devices are talking to each other.

This offers an incredible opportunity for intruders, because by understanding our networks better than we do, they can operate at their strongest when they should be at their weakest.If we are going to take Admiral Rogers’ advice, this is what we must correct.

There are emerging technologies that could help us correct this imbalance. Organizations need real-time visibility into how their devices are communicating so they can identify intruders quickly. We should limit access to important systems; segment networks and important data; patch vulnerable systems; encrypt data.

Each of these steps increases visibility and control.

They enable organizations to quickly identify intruders, act to constrain their movements, and eject them from the network. None of these tools are rocket science, but they require that we focus not just on keeping intruders out, but on catching them when they get in.This reality makes Admiral Rogers’ comments during the Senate hearing all the more poignant.
If there are two types of cybersecurity, why have we invested so heavily in the one where we are at a disadvantage, and given up the advantage we hold for the other? Related Content: As head of cybersecurity strategy, Nathaniel is responsible for thought leadership, public engagement, and overseeing Illumio's security technology strategy. Nathaniel is a regular speaker at leading industry events, and his writing has appeared in industry publications, the ...
View Full Bio More Insights
Security teams must get better at catching intruders where we have the advantage: on our own networks. The Russians spent a year inside the Democratic National Committee before they were discovered. It took five months for OPM to catch the thieves that stole the records of more than four million federal employees. Intruders broke into Yahoo’s systems in 2013, and we don’t even know how long they were inside; Yahoo only discovered the hack when stolen data turned up for sale on the dark web. We invest more and more in our security, but the breaches just get bigger. How many more times does this have to happen before we accept that what we’re doing isn’t working?Earlier this month, during a Senate Armed Service Committee hearing, Admiral Michael S. Rogers, the director of the National Security Agency, told us what we need to do to fix the problem, recognizing two different kinds of cybersecurity: Keeping intruders out of networks. Identifying, containing, and ejecting them once they get inside. We must be able to do both, Admiral Rogers argued, noting that there is an entirely “different thought process, methodology, prioritization, and risk approach to dealing with someone who is already in your network versus trying to keep them out in the first place.”The head of the best offensive agency in the world is telling us exactly what we’re missing, but we aren’t listening. Most organizations still focus heavily on keeping attackers out, rather than trying to catch the ones that get in. A common bit of security wisdom is that hackers have the advantage because they only need to be right once to get in. This is largely true today - hackers can launch assault after assault to try to break through your defenses, probing for a weakness until you slip. And every security team, no matter how good, slips up eventually. But once inside, the intruders are in your network - unfriendly territory. They have to hide inside your environment, and they only have to slip up once to get caught.Consider the White House, one of the most secure buildings on the planet. Jumping the wrought iron fence on Pennsylvania Avenue isn’t the challenge. The challenge is dealing with the Secret Service agents that tackle you as soon as your feet hit the lawn. Cybersecurity teams should play to our strengths, and follow the example of both Admiral Rogers and the Secret Service. We should always work to keep intruders out, but some will always get in. We should heavily invest where we have the advantage: on our own networks. Image Source: By: Orhan Cam via Shutterstock At the White House, it is the Secret Service’s visibility and control inside the grounds that shuts down intruders. Crossing that lawn is exposed, and the Secret Service detects intruders in seconds. Access within the compound is limited to only where you need to go for purposes of your meeting, so visitors that step out of bounds are easy to spot. And once an intruder is detected, there is almost always an agent nearby, with a wide range of tools at their disposal to contain the intrusion. This is the essence of the defender’s advantage: visibility linked with control means that intruders are at a huge disadvantage once they get in.Unfortunately, we have largely ceded this advantage on our networks. Security teams often don’t know what devices are connected, or how those devices are talking to each other. This offers an incredible opportunity for intruders, because by understanding our networks better than we do, they can operate at their strongest when they should be at their weakest.If we are going to take Admiral Rogers’ advice, this is what we must correct. There are emerging technologies that could help us correct this imbalance. Organizations need real-time visibility into how their devices are communicating so they can identify intruders quickly. We should limit access to important systems; segment networks and important data; patch vulnerable systems; encrypt data. Each of these steps increases visibility and control. They enable organizations to quickly identify intruders, act to constrain their movements, and eject them from the network. None of these tools are rocket science, but they require that we focus not just on keeping intruders out, but on catching them when they get in.This reality makes Admiral Rogers’ comments during the Senate hearing all the more poignant. If there are two types of cybersecurity, why have we invested so heavily in the one where we are at a disadvantage, and given up the advantage we hold for the other? Related Content: As head of cybersecurity strategy, Nathaniel is responsible for thought leadership, public engagement, and overseeing Illumio's security technology strategy. Nathaniel is a regular speaker at leading industry events, and his writing has appeared in industry publications, the ... View Full Bio More Insights
Expanded Alliance Combines PwC’s Expertise in Financial Regulatory Requirements with the Best-of-Breed Collibra Data Governance Solution to Help Companies ThriveNew York and London, October 11, 2016 – Collibra, a leader in data governance software solutions for business users, and PwC today announced the two companies have expanded the scope of their existing global partner relationship. With this expanded alliance, Collibra and PwC UK will provide integrated solutions to help financial services organisations understand the impact of global regulatory obligations on the firm's requirements around the implementation and operationalisation of data management and governance to improve operations, improve data quality to mitigate risk, drive growth, and create new sources of value. Global financial services organisations are grappling with how to understand, quickly act on, and remain compliant with a growing host of international financial services regulations, including the Basel Committee of Banking Supervision (BCBS) 239, Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR), the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID) II and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The risks of non-compliance can be severe, with both hard and soft costs in the form of significant financial penalties along with reputation damage for those firms that lag behind. PwC will leverage its Global Centre of Excellence network, focused on regulations and change, to assess and remediate an organisation’s compliance with the regulatory requirements.

A key aspect of this will be through applying PwC’s ARIA framework, which supports assessment of global regulations for a specific subject area within an institution.

ARIA maps the firm's policies and controls to assess compliance against the individual regulatory obligations and helps plan appropriate remediation activities.

This allows companies to plan for the future, and identify actions they need to take and by when, including implementing strategic data governance initiatives enabled by Collibra. Together, Collibra and PwC will empower clients with an aligned business and technology strategy that delivers an end-to-end solution – from regulatory requirements to control framework to effective implementation of the industry-leading Collibra Data Governance and Management solution. “To meet regulatory requirements efficiently and effectively, financial services companies need to first understand the aggregated impact of the regulatory requirements to design the appropriate controls, including data governance,” said Tayyaba Arif, Director Financial Services Data Management, PwC UK. “The association between PwC and Collibra will help organisations drive profitable outcomes and reinvent their businesses.” “Collibra brings deep expertise in supporting the data governance needs of financial services organisations, including supporting five of the 10 largest U.S. banks and more than 25% of the top global banks,” said Felix Van de Maele, Collibra co-founder and CEO. “We’re delighted that PwC recognises the Collibra data governance solution as the most complete and robust solution for enterprises around the world.

Together, our two companies will create an effective path forward for financial services companies that understand that data represents more than a regulatory check-box, but an asset that drives true competitive advantage.” About PwCAt PwC, our purpose is to build trust in society and solve important problems. We’re a network of firms in 157 countries with more than 208,000 people who are committed to delivering quality in assurance, advisory and tax services.

Find out more and tell us what matters to you by visiting us at www.pwc.com. PwC refers to the PwC network and/or one or more of its member firms, each of which is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.© 2016 PwC.

All rights reserved About CollibraAs the leader in data governance, Collibra helps organizations around the world gain competitive advantage by maximizing the value of their data across the enterprise.

Collibra is the only solution purpose-built to address the gamut of data stewardship, governance, and management needs of the most complex, data-intensive industries. Our flexible and configurable cloud-based or on-premises solution puts people and processes first – automating data governance and management to quickly and securely deliver trusted data to the business users who need it. Learn more at www.collibra.com. Media Contact:Francesco TiusUK PR for CollibraFrancesco.tius@axicom.com+44(0)2083924061
Moneyball-style data crunching applied to the beautiful game Manchester City FC has detailed plans to become the first football club to host a data hackathon. The English Premier League Team hopes the event will lead to exclusive insights into the performance of football stars such as Joe Hart, Yaya Touré and Sergio Agüero. Participants in the weekend hack event will be offered access to performance analysis systems, as well as detailed player and match data, to help them uncover new insights on player performance. Tech experts and students are both invited to Manchester City’s #HackMCFC event, which is due to take place at City’s training and youth development facility, close to the club’s east Manchester stadium, between the 29-31 July.

The weekend hacking exercise will end with teams presenting their prototypes. The Premier League, OptaPro and ChyronHego are all supporting the event, which will see participants crunching data from ten Premier League fixtures played last season. Expert teams will compete for an as-yet unspecified cash prize, plus the potential to develop any technologies they come up with alongside MCFC.
Students could win internships at the football club or prizes.

Applications are subject to a selection process. All of this goes to show that when it comes to Big Data, at least, Man City are a massive club with a forward-looking technology strategy to boot. In a statement, Ed Sulley, head of research and innovation for City Football Services, commented: “This Hackathon enables us to engage fans of both sport and technology in this process, and the support of the Premier League means we can provide them with a unique opportunity to access exclusive data they can use to develop creative ideas. We look forward to working with the participants and seeing what ground-breaking technologies they can bring to the table.” Ben Mackriell, head of OptaPro, added: “The application of advanced analytics within professional football has progressed significantly over the past 18 months and is an area where OptaPro has strived to help teams begin to understand its value.” More information on the event – along with sign-up forms – can be found on the hackmcfc.co.uk site here. ®
- Reducing operating costs through accurate sizing at point of sale -eCommerce experts and service provider Tryzens has entered into an exclusive partnership with personalised size guide provider What’sMySize.

The move means Tryzens will be responsible for managing and supporting the product and systems behind What’sMySize’s innovative solution.

Tryzens will offer the sizing guide solution to the market at large and more specifically for their eCommerce customers, as a built-in extra to their Acceleration Service for Demandware, Hybris and Magento platforms. Shoppers use the What’sMySize function located on the product pages of a retailer’s website, to input their measurements.

Thereafter, they are provided with the right clothing and/or shoe sizes for that retailer. With a variance of 1-2 inches between clothing brands, consumers are often surprised by discrepancies in sizing. Whilst they may be a size 10 with one retailer, they could be an 8 or a 12 with another, theoretically similar brand. What’sMySize helps online consumers significantly reduce their need to order multiple sizes and return products by ensuring the right size is purchased every time.

This in turn, has beneficial implications for retailers looking to reduce their operational costs. “With a return rate for online retail fashion and apparel purchases ranging between 20% to 50%, retailers are losing money when they don’t need to” says Kavita Kapoor, CEO, What’sMySize. “There’s unnecessary expense in the end to end experience from direct delivery costs through to stock management and wastage. Just by checking your measurements on Whatsmysize.com a consumer can see that their recommended clothing size can vary significantly between brands.
In partnering with Tryzens we are able to enhance the online experience; building consumer confidence that they’re buying the right size, which in turn increases loyalty and trust in a Brand.” Tryzens is supporting the What’sMySize product roadmap for new and existing clients, by including the sizing function as an additional extra to their popular Acceleration Service.

This will allow Tryzens to provide their clients with the tools to reduce their returns from the outset. What’sMySize’s easy to use integration function allows each retailer to install the What’sMySize service directly onto their website. “What’sMySize is a really innovative platform for the eCommerce retail fashion/apparel market and we are proud to be in an exclusive partnership with this great team,” says Andy Burton, CEO, Tryzens. “We passionately believe in delivering business outcomes for our clients and not just being a traditional SI.

As such, it is important that everything we do either helps our clients reduce operating costs or increase their sales, and ideally both! With the financial, operational and customer experience ‘costs’ associated with a high rate of return, there is plenty of opportunity to help our clients set the benchmark for Generation Consumer’s customer experience, and this partnership will directly address a key industry and consumer issue. We can now integrate this service into our existing eCommerce portfolio and assist our customers in achieving a direct improvement in their operating costs and margins.” What’sMySize has already been proven to decrease retailer return rates.

During a recent study of a UK high street retailer, returns were reduced by 25% over a period of 70 days, when the What’sMySize technology was implemented. NOTES TO EDITORS About TryzensSince 2004, Tryzens has been trusted by retail’s biggest names as an independent expert to plan, implement and maintain eCommerce systems and to optimise retail performance through systems & services. Tryzens enables its clients to leverage efficient, effective and reliable retail solutions that carry the promise of a positive and unified experience that in turn delights their customers, builds loyalty and drives growth. From concept to outcome, Tryzens offer a range of services to support our clients throughout their multi-channel development, whether starting in-store or online.www.tryzens.com About What’sMySizeWhat’sMySize is a fitting room in your sitting room.

Translating your measurements into the correct clothing size for all your favourite brands. No more confusing multi brand size charts, just a single What’sMySize profile that works across multiple retailers. We pride ourselves on being the easiest sizing solution for retailers to implement and with our proven success at reducing size related return rates we delight retailers and consumers alike. What’sMySize was created by ex Figleaves.com technologists as a side project.

The clever tech they crafted won the prestigious Innovate UK Award (previously known as the Digital Britain Technology Strategy Board). What’sMySize has been actively resizing Britain since 2013 when it was officially incorporated. Led by co-founders Kavita Kapoor and Tammy Learn the technology continues to work with fashion labels from around the world to take the mystery out of online sizing. Editorial contactsNick Ringrow / Paul MooreSpreckley PartnersT: 020 7388 9988E: ringrow@spreckley.co.uk