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Computer system threats come in many different forms. Some of the most common threats today are software attacks, theft of intellectual property, identity theft, theft of equipment or information, sabotage, and information extortion. Most people have experienced software attacks of some sort. Viruses, worms, phishing attacks, and Trojan horses are a few common examples of software attacks. The theft of intellectual property has also been an extensive issue for many businesses in the IT field. Intellectual property is the ownership of property usually consisting of some form of protection. Theft of software is probably the most common in IT businesses today. Identity theft is the attempt to act as someone else usually to obtain that person’s personal information or to take advantage of their access to vital information. Theft of equipment or information is becoming more prevalent today due to the fact that most devices today are mobile. Cell phones are prone to theft and have also become far more desirable as the amount of data capacity increases. Sabotage usually consists of the destruction of an organization′s website in an attempt to cause loss of confidence to its customers. Information extortion consists of theft of a company′s property or information as an attempt to receive a payment in exchange for returning the information or property back to its owner. There are many ways to help protect yourself from some of these attacks but one of the most functional precautions is user carefulness.

Use of DNS Tunneling for C&C Communications

Often, virus writers don't even bother to run encryption or mask their communications. However, you do get the occasional off-the-wall approaches that don't fall into either of the categories.

Take, for instance, the case of a Trojan that Kaspersky Lab researchers discovered in mid-March and which establishes a DNS tunnel for communication with the C&C server.

Verizon DBIR Shows Attack Patterns Vary Widely By Industry

It's not always the newest or the most sophisticated threat you need to worry about, Verizon's breach and security incident data for 2016 shows.

Mysterious cat-and-mouse-themed Trojan RAT is potentially dangerous, but its creators and...

The highly skilled nature of the threat actors behind Felismus, and their ability to cover their tracks, means that no-one knows their identity or their target.

APT Threat Evolution in Q1 2017

Kaspersky Lab is currently tracking more than a hundred threat actors and sophisticated malicious operations in over 80 countries.

During the first quarter of 2017, there were 33 private reports released to subscribers of our Intelligence Services, with IOC data and YARA rules to assist in forensics and malware-hunting.

Threat Intelligence Is (Still) Broken: A Cautionary Tale from the Past

There is much to be learned from the striking parallels between counter-terrorism threat analysis before 9-11 and how we handle cyber threat intelligence today.

Locky Returns with a New (Borrowed) Distribution Method

A layered defense is a strong security posture for dealing with a threat like Locky, that can come in different disguises.

RiskIQ Researchers Identify New Threat Actor NoTrove Delivering Millions of Scam...

London, UK – 26 April, 2017 – Earlier this year, RiskIQ, the leader in digital threat management, reported an eight-fold increase in internet scam incidents that deny the $83 billion digital advertising industry millions of dollars. Now, researchers at RiskIQ have identified NoTrove, a newly discovered and major threat actor that is delivering millions of scam ads that threaten consumers and further undermine the digital advertising industry.A new research report released today, “NoTrove: The Threat... Source: RealWire

NTT Security finds 86 percent of Australia’s attacks come from within

NTT Security's latest Global Threat Intelligence Report has found the majority of all attacks experienced in Australia during a 12-month period originated in Australia.

4 Industries Account for Majority of Global Ransomware Attacks

When it comes to 77% of global ransomware attacks, these four industries take the greatest hit, according to a global threat trends report released today.

Bash Bunny: Big hacks come in tiny packages

Today’s increasingly miniaturized world is giving rise to all sorts of hardware devices that can hack almost any computer, device, or network. Plug in an item the size of a USB stick and all your hard-won protections could be defeated.
If you haven’t been paying attention to this field of attack, what you learn might shock you.Anyone can create or buy a computer with an operating system that fits in a space smaller than a postage stamp. Most of these have physical USB interfaces, but many are wireless or have interchangeable interfaces.

These devices include the following:Computers on a stick Keyboard man-in-the-middle intercept devices Wireless computers Plug-in hacking devices [ Also from InfoWorld: The 10 Windows group policy settings you need to get right. | Survive and thrive with the new OS: The ultimate Windows 10 survivor kit. | Stay up on key Microsoft technologies with the Windows newsletter. ]In the interest of defending against this new threat, let's take a close look at one of the most versatile and popular hardware hacking devices: Bash Bunny by Hak5.
I'm offering considerable detail here to show how easy it is to launch malicious attacks that bypass network defenses—and to help white hats who may wish to use the device for simulated red team attacks.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Researchers claim China trying to hack South Korea missile defense efforts

Deployment of THAAD upsets China, seen as espionage tool.

Chrome, Firefox, and Opera users beware: This isn’t the apple.com you...

Unicode sleight of hand makes it hard for even savvy users to detect impostor sites.