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Wikitribune is Jimmy Wales’ attempt to wage war on fake news

Wikipedia cofounder says pages won't go live until trusted volunteers verify stories.

Proclaim Practice Management system offers a platform for expansion at Higgins...

Based in Stockport, Higgins Miller Solicitors specialises in divorce, matrimonial, family issues and children disputes. Offering legal services across the whole of England and Wales, the firm provides friendly but robust and practical client service. R...

Coppers ‘persistently’ breach data protection laws with police tech

Staff association warns that systems 'increasingly' being used for personal reasons Coppers in England and Wales are "persistently" committing data breaches, according to the Police Federation's head of misconduct.…

Thousands of NHS staff details lost in breach of IT contractor’s...

Radiation dose-measuring firm took months to let Welsh trust know The personal information of thousands of medical staff in Wales were stolen following a breach of an IT contractor's server.…

Artificial Intelligence Platform Cloud.IQ Secures GBP£4M Funding To Build On 100%...

London, 9th March 2017 – Cloud.IQ, the conversion rate optimisation platform for e-commerce, announces a GBP£4M Series A funding round, led by London based pan European fund Nauta Capital and advised by Armada Ventures.

Finance Wales also participated in the round, alongside existing investors Juno Capital.This latest investment round enables cloud.IQ to continue its rapid growth, international expansion and fuel new product development of the cloud.IQ platform, through which a 0.2% conversion uplift can increase... Source: RealWire

Brit cops can keep millions of mugshots of innocent folks on...

You can ask to be removed, but it's up to officers to listen, Home Office cheerfully concludes After unlawfully hoarding millions of mugshots of one-time suspects, police chiefs in England and Wales were this week told to delete the snaps – but only if people in the photos complain.

And even then, requests can be easily waved away.…

Majority of Android VPNs can’t be trusted to make users more...

Study of nearly 300 apps finds shocking omissions, including a failure to encrypt.

UK courts experiencing surge in cyber-crime case load

Value of fraud surpasses £1bn for first time in five years The total cost of fraudulent activity in the UK surpassed a billion pounds for the first time in five years, reaching £1.137bn in 2016 compared to £732m the year before. Fraud against businesses was up sevenfold last year, with inside jobs committed by employees and management the most common method, as measured by alleged fraud cases reaching court. "The figures include over £900m derived from just seven super cases," according to management consultants KPMG. "The surge in super cases, from £250m last year, may be a reflection of fraud becoming a more lucrative and practical proposition for those with the right skills and technology, or those in senior commercial roles." A major cause for the overall increase was a surge in cyber-fraud losses of £124m, according the latest edition of KPMG's Fraud Barometer, out Tuesday. One case alone cost an eye-watering £113m via a boiler-room scam that involved crooks cold-calling prospective marks while posing as the security department of banks and tricking victims into handing over banking details. Crime figures for England and Wales, put together by the UK Office for National Statistics and released earlier this month, featured the inclusion of fraud and computer misuse offences for the first time.

A total of 3.6 million cases of fraud and 2 million computer misuse offences were logged.

That's a record of crime reports, many of which won't lead to prosecutions, by contrast to the massive cases covering multimillion-pound frauds that are the focus of KPMG's Fraud Barometer. Criminal structures supporting cyber-fraud exist in many forms and sizes from organisations comparable to Gus Fring's business in Breaking Bad to street-corner operations that security experts fear are drawing youngsters and the technically unskilled into its web. Ilia Kolochenko, chief exec of web security firm High-Tech Bridge, commented: "What is particularly alarming is the rise of small online fraud committed by teenagers and people with almost no technical skills." ® Sponsored: Flash enters the mainstream.
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Shocking crime surge – THE TRUTH: England, Wales stats now include...

'More realistic picture' we're told Crime stats for England and Wales have shown a huge year-on-year increase.

Don't panic, though: it's due to the inclusion of fraud and computer misuse offences for the first time. In a report published this week, the UK Office for National Statistics (ONS) reckoned there were 6.2 million reported incidents of crime in the 12 months to September 2016 in England and Wales, and that this figure is virtually unchanged from the previous year. Crucially, the beancounters have now thrown fraud and hacking crimes into the mix. When the criteria for what's included in the stats were drawn up decades ago, "fraud was not considered a significant threat and the internet had yet to be invented," said the ONS's John Flatley. Obviously, that's no longer the case. When you include 3.6 million cases of fraud and 2 million computer misuse offences, that 6.2 million figure jumps to 11.8 million.

That's a 90 per cent surge in illegal activity. Of course, adding a positive integer to another positive integer results in a bigger positive integer (barring an arithmetic overflow). No surprise there. However, the fact that computer crime and fraud are now being included may make people and organisations more aware of the threat, according to Huntsman Security. Piers Wilson, head of product management at Huntsman, told us: “Including cybercrime in regular crime figures might lead to a dramatic increase this year, but over time it can only be a good thing. We will get a much more realistic picture of the extent of such crimes, leading to a greater understanding of how to identify, prioritise and address them.” ONS crime reports have been produced every year for the past 35 years.

The stats covers England and Wales – and not Scotland and Northern Ireland because the latter two maintain separate judicial and policing regimes. ® Sponsored: Next gen cybersecurity.
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Shocking crime surge – THE TRUTH: England, Wales stats now include...

'More realistic picture' we're told Crime stats for England and Wales have shown a huge year-on-year increase.

Don't panic, though: it's due to the inclusion of fraud and computer misuse offences for the first time.…

San Francisco sues local drone maker, drone maker then shuts down

EnlargeLily Robotics reader comments 52 Share this story A San Francisco-based drone startup that raised $34 million in pre-orders folded on Thursday, the same day the company, Lily Robotics, was sued by the local district attorney in county court.

The city accuses Lily Robotics of engaging in false advertising and unlawful business practices. The company's story is reminiscent of the now-defunct Torquing Group, a Wales-based firm that raised $3.4 million (the largest European Kickstarter project to date) to build a drone called the Zano that ended up not going anywhere, either. In 2015, Lily Robotics released a slick YouTube promo video demonstrating its drone, calling it the world’s first “throw-and-shoot camera.” It received widespread, breathless coverage from various other media outlets, ranging from Wired to TechCrunch. Lily Robotics' founders were named on the “Forbes 30 under 30” list in 2015.

And in addition to its pre-orders, the startup took in $15 million in venture capital, according to CrunchBase.
As District Attorney George Gascón alleged in the civil complaint: Despite taking all of these prepaid orders, Lily Robotics has continued to delay shipment of the Lilys. When defendant began accepting preorders in May 2015, it told customers that the Lily Camera would ship in February 2016 or May 2016, depending on when the preorder was made.

Then, in December 2015, Lily Robotics delayed all shipments to “Summer 2016.” It delayed shipments again in August 2016; according to its notice, US customers would get their Lily Cameras in “December 2016 to January 2017,” while its non-US customers would get them sometime “later in 2017.” As of the writing of this Complaint, not a single unit has been shipped. In a Thursday statement, the company did not address what went wrong, only saying that it was “sad to see this adventure come to an end.” The startup did not respond to Ars’ request for comment. In addition to the lawsuit, a local judge in San Francisco granted the city’s request to impose restrictions on the company’s bank accounts, requiring that they only be used to pay employees and issue refunds. The two sides are set to appear before Superior Court Judge Harold Kahn on January 18.

Hack reveals data company Cellebrite works with everyone from US cops...

Enlarge / Leeor Ben-Peretz is the executive vice president of the Israeli firm Cellebrite.JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images reader comments 38 Share this story On Thursday, Vice Motherboard reported that an unnamed source provided the site with 900GB of data hacked from Cellebrite, the well-known mobile phone data extraction company. Among other products, Cellebrite's UFED system offers "in-depth physical, file system, password, and logical extractions of evidentiary data," and is often the go-to product for law enforcement to pull data from seized phones and other devices. In a statement, Cellebrite called this hack "illegal" and noted that "the company is not aware of any specific increased risk to customers as a result of this incident; however, my.Cellebrite account holders are advised to change their passwords as a precaution." In addition, the trove of materials contains “customer support tickets” showing that the Israeli company sells its services to countries with questionable human rights records, including Turkey, Russia, and the United Arab Emirates. Cellebrite’s own website shows that the company works with numerous local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies, ranging from the Hartford, Connecticut police to the North Wales police in the United Kingdom. (The company reportedly aided the FBI to unlock the seized San Bernardino iPhone that became the center of a protracted legal battle.) However, little is known about the company’s business in many parts of the world. This would not be the first time that a digital surveillance company sold to unsavory regimes.
In 2015, data dumps from Hacking Team showed that it sold exploits to Egypt, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and the United Arab Emirates. Similarly, in 2014, documents leaked online showing that software created by the controversial UK-based Gamma Group International was used to spy on computers that appeared to be located in the US, the UK, Germany, Russia, Iran, and Bahrain.