6 C
London
Wednesday, November 22, 2017
Home Tags Web Browser

Tag: Web Browser

Let's Encrypt, an organization set up to encourage broader use of encryption on the Web, has distributed 1 million free digital certificates in just three months. The digital certificates cover 2.5 million domains, most of which had never implemented SSL/TLS (Secure Sockets Layer/Transport Layer Security), which encrypts content exchanged between a system and a user.

An encrypted connection is signified in most browsers by "https" and a padlock appearing in the URL bar. "Much more work remains to be done before the Internet is free from insecure protocols, but this is substantial and rapid progress," according to a blog post by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, one of Let's Encrypt's supporters. The organization is run by the ISRG (Internet Security Research Group) and is backed by Mozilla, Cisco, Akamai, Facebook and others. There's been a push in recent years to encourage websites to implement SSL/TLS, driven in part by a rise in cybercrime, data breaches and government surveillance. Google, Yahoo, and Facebook have all taken steps to secure their services. SSL/TLS certificates are sold by major players such as Verisign and Comodo, with certain types of certificates costing hundreds of dollars and needing periodic renewal.

Critics contend the cost puts off some website operators, which is in part why Let's Encrypt launched a free project. "It is clear that the cost and bureaucracy of obtaining certificates was forcing many websites to continue with the insecure HTTP protocol, long after we've known that HTTPS needs to be the default," the EFF wrote.
Updated firefox packages that fix multiple security issues are nowavailable for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, 6, and 7.Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical securityimpact.

Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base scores, which givedetailed severity ratings, are available for each vulnerability from theCVE links in the References section. Mozilla Firefox is an open source web browser. XULRunner provides the XULRuntime environment for Mozilla Firefox.Several flaws were found in the processing of malformed web content.

A webpage containing malicious content could cause Firefox to crash or,potentially, execute arbitrary code with the privileges of the user runningFirefox. (CVE-2016-1952, CVE-2016-1954, CVE-2016-1957, CVE-2016-1958,CVE-2016-1960, CVE-2016-1961, CVE-2016-1962, CVE-2016-1973, CVE-2016-1974,CVE-2016-1964, CVE-2016-1965, CVE-2016-1966)Multiple security flaws were found in the graphite2 font library shippedwith Firefox.

A web page containing malicious content could cause Firefoxto crash or, potentially, execute arbitrary code with the privileges of theuser running Firefox. (CVE-2016-1977, CVE-2016-2790, CVE-2016-2791,CVE-2016-2792, CVE-2016-2793, CVE-2016-2794, CVE-2016-2795, CVE-2016-2796,CVE-2016-2797, CVE-2016-2798, CVE-2016-2799, CVE-2016-2800, CVE-2016-2801,CVE-2016-2802)Red Hat would like to thank the Mozilla project for reporting these issues.Upstream acknowledges Bob Clary, Christoph Diehl, Christian Holler, AndrewMcCreight, Daniel Holbert, Jesse Ruderman, Randell Jesup, NicolasGolubovic, Jose Martinez, Romina Santillan, Abdulrahman Alqabandi,ca0nguyen, lokihardt, Dominique Hazaël-Massieux, Nicolas Grégoire, TsubasaIinuma, the Communications Electronics Security Group (UK) of the GCHQ,Holger Fuhrmannek, Ronald Crane, and Tyson Smith as the original reportersof these issues.All Firefox users should upgrade to these updated packages, which containFirefox version 38.7.0 ESR, which corrects these issues.

After installingthe update, Firefox must be restarted for the changes to take effect. Red Hat Enterprise Linux (v. 5 server) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.src.rpm     MD5: e206be4f36492776fc72f27287059fbeSHA-256: bab5ee48b32211b147849b4e2ad1cc77752ae67777384e7b713c5fc8d19cad5f   IA-32: firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 1023c01cd39916b44c10ba81d8bf9446SHA-256: 0156a3e3c0912ad237810784b601fdadb4ea1b9ffb7bc81f85129dec486dda5c firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 40d164e28cc830fdc600236361d9f139SHA-256: e22cc60855ed4670893f30ee48f47137aebd6cfec6bbde14f4cc09215c35f56a   PPC: firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.ppc64.rpm     MD5: e52cd94e3511d48e5fb295c9d3fdef3eSHA-256: 1f12a750d0772033fd3de036bdffa00cee02d021897a5e40fb70b3336e8663fc firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el5_11.ppc64.rpm     MD5: c0bbd726370f99925875333b4fe73514SHA-256: c2be255d533be834f3a0f70f99c843b7547a07c4f41ff6a62ff2649ba110dad5   s390x: firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.s390.rpm     MD5: 720f956fe223528b5114b68434370056SHA-256: 4a222b945213c69b6d15fd7603a5425ba3117ee7356b9cfdc96341d89a4337be firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: f33246b941246c5a21dac89bbb565e14SHA-256: e703c3b0a94ca6660ab7b9a7304713bde341440c9530d515b75d4fc7b276277e firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el5_11.s390.rpm     MD5: c0a3278018a12bf9ad2302e692777212SHA-256: 24b69914b3c5b65dbb5113ac37e58b15d9dff819081f60a23b79114da812508f firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: 1356bbb0d66a2d1877574b93109d82dfSHA-256: 9e08617808e1f8c6e32e45af8c5c95a0273238d4346fac3ea64fdfd4c71f067e   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 1023c01cd39916b44c10ba81d8bf9446SHA-256: 0156a3e3c0912ad237810784b601fdadb4ea1b9ffb7bc81f85129dec486dda5c firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 6f7442aabd99bcbe3dc4d231fcec2e8aSHA-256: c159e21009ddb3162bc676c77dfa9089d510ec6e3b06dec000b4fef110498390 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 40d164e28cc830fdc600236361d9f139SHA-256: e22cc60855ed4670893f30ee48f47137aebd6cfec6bbde14f4cc09215c35f56a firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 47ada6a4225ac79759f710f6d4aa7190SHA-256: ec9aa4e27a59320791d8a1767a37935799b3a0ef4025d237d7156aae482b6b59   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 5 client) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.src.rpm     MD5: e206be4f36492776fc72f27287059fbeSHA-256: bab5ee48b32211b147849b4e2ad1cc77752ae67777384e7b713c5fc8d19cad5f   IA-32: firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 1023c01cd39916b44c10ba81d8bf9446SHA-256: 0156a3e3c0912ad237810784b601fdadb4ea1b9ffb7bc81f85129dec486dda5c firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 40d164e28cc830fdc600236361d9f139SHA-256: e22cc60855ed4670893f30ee48f47137aebd6cfec6bbde14f4cc09215c35f56a   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 1023c01cd39916b44c10ba81d8bf9446SHA-256: 0156a3e3c0912ad237810784b601fdadb4ea1b9ffb7bc81f85129dec486dda5c firefox-38.7.0-1.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 6f7442aabd99bcbe3dc4d231fcec2e8aSHA-256: c159e21009ddb3162bc676c77dfa9089d510ec6e3b06dec000b4fef110498390 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 40d164e28cc830fdc600236361d9f139SHA-256: e22cc60855ed4670893f30ee48f47137aebd6cfec6bbde14f4cc09215c35f56a firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 47ada6a4225ac79759f710f6d4aa7190SHA-256: ec9aa4e27a59320791d8a1767a37935799b3a0ef4025d237d7156aae482b6b59   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 6) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.src.rpm     MD5: a7356446b327d0074cfa0ff9e85b4166SHA-256: bae9ce690d82de88c4e88f2069eebd939131484c95dafd416e399f37b0e17105   IA-32: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: bc7cd9ebdb711e88bd05ddef584db046SHA-256: 622a707262727bc9ba5cd239ffaa3b78e0c5bf1f63da394a32437b9403029c1f firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: 9bb3fe93aecfe5b49d578950ed188250SHA-256: 2aac751ffdd7d8ea7410509632381c5310634e8c22e6ef1dc9ac7bc4324d7d54   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: bc7cd9ebdb711e88bd05ddef584db046SHA-256: 622a707262727bc9ba5cd239ffaa3b78e0c5bf1f63da394a32437b9403029c1f firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 92ce0be5b9f7e9e111e6a90fec84d6ecSHA-256: dd596b6e5ab52ecec1e7809e06788b1409cfd7ae8af5a4d32f94a926f3d37632 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: 9bb3fe93aecfe5b49d578950ed188250SHA-256: 2aac751ffdd7d8ea7410509632381c5310634e8c22e6ef1dc9ac7bc4324d7d54 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 54992f669b432d98b2cf89baf106ae97SHA-256: 1baaf80d15ea174368114dc0e985e327921d5f00e34a02103c7eee5e3756a1fa   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 7) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.src.rpm     MD5: a6d4ec4592670845552bf923e3725102SHA-256: 7690ea4b96e6381f72d07b88dba732fc4233ade324f8c5fe69a9a0181ca6daf1   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.i686.rpm     MD5: 8dbb8f192f3edca755f58d78de1959b0SHA-256: f7805562d6db31e943357ff83da8938e89f72b4785f7ffcc2c2c7cffd03f7226 firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e2496cf69bb2cd31ab1cf5f7733180d6SHA-256: 7eeb773d86adc38b2724015302b17d2b31bf682640ea2b90bad927075e12dcd0 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.i686.rpm     MD5: ae24f584073a40a955f0c7fe1fc02113SHA-256: ece091836e4620bc650356b5014187d69cff97ecfe5616b7c5236d56270a5d29 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0227b11add6f19294dda0f6c153243caSHA-256: b5ee77dd02cc105b2c15176c32c435237be0e0947f418dda0bc7f3e113a7ef69   Red Hat Enterprise Linux HPC Node (v. 6) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.src.rpm     MD5: a7356446b327d0074cfa0ff9e85b4166SHA-256: bae9ce690d82de88c4e88f2069eebd939131484c95dafd416e399f37b0e17105   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: bc7cd9ebdb711e88bd05ddef584db046SHA-256: 622a707262727bc9ba5cd239ffaa3b78e0c5bf1f63da394a32437b9403029c1f firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 92ce0be5b9f7e9e111e6a90fec84d6ecSHA-256: dd596b6e5ab52ecec1e7809e06788b1409cfd7ae8af5a4d32f94a926f3d37632 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: 9bb3fe93aecfe5b49d578950ed188250SHA-256: 2aac751ffdd7d8ea7410509632381c5310634e8c22e6ef1dc9ac7bc4324d7d54 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 54992f669b432d98b2cf89baf106ae97SHA-256: 1baaf80d15ea174368114dc0e985e327921d5f00e34a02103c7eee5e3756a1fa   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (v. 6) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.src.rpm     MD5: a7356446b327d0074cfa0ff9e85b4166SHA-256: bae9ce690d82de88c4e88f2069eebd939131484c95dafd416e399f37b0e17105   IA-32: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: bc7cd9ebdb711e88bd05ddef584db046SHA-256: 622a707262727bc9ba5cd239ffaa3b78e0c5bf1f63da394a32437b9403029c1f firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: 9bb3fe93aecfe5b49d578950ed188250SHA-256: 2aac751ffdd7d8ea7410509632381c5310634e8c22e6ef1dc9ac7bc4324d7d54   PPC: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.ppc.rpm     MD5: 4cda6537bce467cacb1722b97a2526c7SHA-256: e9650f627d1636dd6cc614036428faddd64574974c2037a11c5ea7e625c3b70c firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.ppc64.rpm     MD5: eb1afd95cf5194199d32a0d25fa1f38fSHA-256: daa640daf5c16fcf7bc46162db849bd640fcaa23e8af52e9efbe7c5896960aa6 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.ppc.rpm     MD5: 82ab0e8476f2e672563d205a75831ac6SHA-256: db91b848344c1bbd8481e98f454143df912221babccbb3bbe07a0fbe38ca3672 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 8d504613ba2974f16f8c2aae09f9e007SHA-256: ff322f9b8f9980831e829771850995158a442d171d1abf795ed977e5ebb9a40c   s390x: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.s390.rpm     MD5: 067283937ccf423b2cd973d0b888f33cSHA-256: 105aae31cd5d0cba5d5b54f1032a3de6b705e599bdad761f385364133e2e8915 firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.s390x.rpm     MD5: 52fef089d412eb5d8597c46319169e70SHA-256: f94630bae4579ff3979893070c2d438071bb72ba0f67e0bb952edda82225edc7 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.s390.rpm     MD5: 6b5a204bfa21ca185d228ababee3657aSHA-256: bc35771264abe08f59a322ae68a42d52361ca6fa1df771f6743d610f37877bf0 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.s390x.rpm     MD5: fd4758e14e8cac393f2b4e55149095efSHA-256: 38f145e0e436a3603f7ccfe06726bb92b3fe9768a41c3a926dc70f33b4623939   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: bc7cd9ebdb711e88bd05ddef584db046SHA-256: 622a707262727bc9ba5cd239ffaa3b78e0c5bf1f63da394a32437b9403029c1f firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 92ce0be5b9f7e9e111e6a90fec84d6ecSHA-256: dd596b6e5ab52ecec1e7809e06788b1409cfd7ae8af5a4d32f94a926f3d37632 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: 9bb3fe93aecfe5b49d578950ed188250SHA-256: 2aac751ffdd7d8ea7410509632381c5310634e8c22e6ef1dc9ac7bc4324d7d54 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 54992f669b432d98b2cf89baf106ae97SHA-256: 1baaf80d15ea174368114dc0e985e327921d5f00e34a02103c7eee5e3756a1fa   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (v. 7) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.src.rpm     MD5: a6d4ec4592670845552bf923e3725102SHA-256: 7690ea4b96e6381f72d07b88dba732fc4233ade324f8c5fe69a9a0181ca6daf1   PPC: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc.rpm     MD5: c096f2d9a1c0daac8dc9556b33edc5a2SHA-256: 034a6e138a31474604492000b819f042e08b181a8b439919443e87b8687158db firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 89f8cd3937087fe920f21a3ea7231335SHA-256: 95f1b3bc4bf3de8a0b18cf0d9e229423e9f3b921c233017753144f00272e436c firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc.rpm     MD5: 6943c0a346f61fe71f6cddcc41f5c225SHA-256: ad2524a02f9768a227e30a191152e0568e18d79a8e6595fffee2a868cf80ffce firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 7587fa21c52ef2f37137e60913be5a47SHA-256: 2983e5e4e11b5e2b8122f91c6fce1c6c8a8b9a21e5a34832b6767859d79b0db9   PPC64LE: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: cbcd9c3c1101ce4d6117fc55d2a64bcaSHA-256: 0f6fc0691cab4834b683b23b0a127ae9fb02b3ce6ce9aeae2e361ab0a3f3e26f firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 5eb266f9e7699049052b698ce3fff619SHA-256: 4f3e338c1010a90a8d0b15cbd0373f05109eaa008bf95fcd1c3de6c33260fd7c   s390x: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.s390.rpm     MD5: 47a260d162fb061712a2dfcc5d810d25SHA-256: 987cb26c6689f84d29cd0a9b6bf0c5767bbb6b5c983e0f0c84a32b42702ff1ed firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.s390x.rpm     MD5: dd7bf79bad3e049a8db6115ee25c665eSHA-256: 1d0efbe23c2969a335504e4239a3fb37dc0e5f18457866a17c0a527f33f6210a firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.s390.rpm     MD5: e28542943b28ea93acd62bd799e08b6eSHA-256: b393f1068d029aae2fa2641d8ca950eb2ffbdd91ed08ce9c1d49b26395cfb244 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.s390x.rpm     MD5: 638d88d3aa932212aaf803bd74ecd891SHA-256: 9699730189c2c48de94f26c1cd70328ab44f3f170b2b3e66d419d41156626d72   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.i686.rpm     MD5: 8dbb8f192f3edca755f58d78de1959b0SHA-256: f7805562d6db31e943357ff83da8938e89f72b4785f7ffcc2c2c7cffd03f7226 firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e2496cf69bb2cd31ab1cf5f7733180d6SHA-256: 7eeb773d86adc38b2724015302b17d2b31bf682640ea2b90bad927075e12dcd0 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.i686.rpm     MD5: ae24f584073a40a955f0c7fe1fc02113SHA-256: ece091836e4620bc650356b5014187d69cff97ecfe5616b7c5236d56270a5d29 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0227b11add6f19294dda0f6c153243caSHA-256: b5ee77dd02cc105b2c15176c32c435237be0e0947f418dda0bc7f3e113a7ef69   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server AUS (v. 7.2) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.src.rpm     MD5: a6d4ec4592670845552bf923e3725102SHA-256: 7690ea4b96e6381f72d07b88dba732fc4233ade324f8c5fe69a9a0181ca6daf1   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.i686.rpm     MD5: 8dbb8f192f3edca755f58d78de1959b0SHA-256: f7805562d6db31e943357ff83da8938e89f72b4785f7ffcc2c2c7cffd03f7226 firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e2496cf69bb2cd31ab1cf5f7733180d6SHA-256: 7eeb773d86adc38b2724015302b17d2b31bf682640ea2b90bad927075e12dcd0 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.i686.rpm     MD5: ae24f584073a40a955f0c7fe1fc02113SHA-256: ece091836e4620bc650356b5014187d69cff97ecfe5616b7c5236d56270a5d29 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0227b11add6f19294dda0f6c153243caSHA-256: b5ee77dd02cc105b2c15176c32c435237be0e0947f418dda0bc7f3e113a7ef69   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server EUS (v. 6.7.z) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.src.rpm     MD5: a7356446b327d0074cfa0ff9e85b4166SHA-256: bae9ce690d82de88c4e88f2069eebd939131484c95dafd416e399f37b0e17105   IA-32: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: bc7cd9ebdb711e88bd05ddef584db046SHA-256: 622a707262727bc9ba5cd239ffaa3b78e0c5bf1f63da394a32437b9403029c1f firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: 9bb3fe93aecfe5b49d578950ed188250SHA-256: 2aac751ffdd7d8ea7410509632381c5310634e8c22e6ef1dc9ac7bc4324d7d54   PPC: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.ppc.rpm     MD5: 4cda6537bce467cacb1722b97a2526c7SHA-256: e9650f627d1636dd6cc614036428faddd64574974c2037a11c5ea7e625c3b70c firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.ppc64.rpm     MD5: eb1afd95cf5194199d32a0d25fa1f38fSHA-256: daa640daf5c16fcf7bc46162db849bd640fcaa23e8af52e9efbe7c5896960aa6 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.ppc.rpm     MD5: 82ab0e8476f2e672563d205a75831ac6SHA-256: db91b848344c1bbd8481e98f454143df912221babccbb3bbe07a0fbe38ca3672 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 8d504613ba2974f16f8c2aae09f9e007SHA-256: ff322f9b8f9980831e829771850995158a442d171d1abf795ed977e5ebb9a40c   s390x: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.s390.rpm     MD5: 067283937ccf423b2cd973d0b888f33cSHA-256: 105aae31cd5d0cba5d5b54f1032a3de6b705e599bdad761f385364133e2e8915 firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.s390x.rpm     MD5: 52fef089d412eb5d8597c46319169e70SHA-256: f94630bae4579ff3979893070c2d438071bb72ba0f67e0bb952edda82225edc7 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.s390.rpm     MD5: 6b5a204bfa21ca185d228ababee3657aSHA-256: bc35771264abe08f59a322ae68a42d52361ca6fa1df771f6743d610f37877bf0 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.s390x.rpm     MD5: fd4758e14e8cac393f2b4e55149095efSHA-256: 38f145e0e436a3603f7ccfe06726bb92b3fe9768a41c3a926dc70f33b4623939   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: bc7cd9ebdb711e88bd05ddef584db046SHA-256: 622a707262727bc9ba5cd239ffaa3b78e0c5bf1f63da394a32437b9403029c1f firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 92ce0be5b9f7e9e111e6a90fec84d6ecSHA-256: dd596b6e5ab52ecec1e7809e06788b1409cfd7ae8af5a4d32f94a926f3d37632 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: 9bb3fe93aecfe5b49d578950ed188250SHA-256: 2aac751ffdd7d8ea7410509632381c5310634e8c22e6ef1dc9ac7bc4324d7d54 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 54992f669b432d98b2cf89baf106ae97SHA-256: 1baaf80d15ea174368114dc0e985e327921d5f00e34a02103c7eee5e3756a1fa   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server EUS (v. 7.2) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.src.rpm     MD5: a6d4ec4592670845552bf923e3725102SHA-256: 7690ea4b96e6381f72d07b88dba732fc4233ade324f8c5fe69a9a0181ca6daf1   PPC: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc.rpm     MD5: c096f2d9a1c0daac8dc9556b33edc5a2SHA-256: 034a6e138a31474604492000b819f042e08b181a8b439919443e87b8687158db firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 89f8cd3937087fe920f21a3ea7231335SHA-256: 95f1b3bc4bf3de8a0b18cf0d9e229423e9f3b921c233017753144f00272e436c firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc.rpm     MD5: 6943c0a346f61fe71f6cddcc41f5c225SHA-256: ad2524a02f9768a227e30a191152e0568e18d79a8e6595fffee2a868cf80ffce firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 7587fa21c52ef2f37137e60913be5a47SHA-256: 2983e5e4e11b5e2b8122f91c6fce1c6c8a8b9a21e5a34832b6767859d79b0db9   PPC64LE: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: cbcd9c3c1101ce4d6117fc55d2a64bcaSHA-256: 0f6fc0691cab4834b683b23b0a127ae9fb02b3ce6ce9aeae2e361ab0a3f3e26f firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.ppc64le.rpm     MD5: 5eb266f9e7699049052b698ce3fff619SHA-256: 4f3e338c1010a90a8d0b15cbd0373f05109eaa008bf95fcd1c3de6c33260fd7c   s390x: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.s390.rpm     MD5: 47a260d162fb061712a2dfcc5d810d25SHA-256: 987cb26c6689f84d29cd0a9b6bf0c5767bbb6b5c983e0f0c84a32b42702ff1ed firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.s390x.rpm     MD5: dd7bf79bad3e049a8db6115ee25c665eSHA-256: 1d0efbe23c2969a335504e4239a3fb37dc0e5f18457866a17c0a527f33f6210a firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.s390.rpm     MD5: e28542943b28ea93acd62bd799e08b6eSHA-256: b393f1068d029aae2fa2641d8ca950eb2ffbdd91ed08ce9c1d49b26395cfb244 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.s390x.rpm     MD5: 638d88d3aa932212aaf803bd74ecd891SHA-256: 9699730189c2c48de94f26c1cd70328ab44f3f170b2b3e66d419d41156626d72   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.i686.rpm     MD5: 8dbb8f192f3edca755f58d78de1959b0SHA-256: f7805562d6db31e943357ff83da8938e89f72b4785f7ffcc2c2c7cffd03f7226 firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e2496cf69bb2cd31ab1cf5f7733180d6SHA-256: 7eeb773d86adc38b2724015302b17d2b31bf682640ea2b90bad927075e12dcd0 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.i686.rpm     MD5: ae24f584073a40a955f0c7fe1fc02113SHA-256: ece091836e4620bc650356b5014187d69cff97ecfe5616b7c5236d56270a5d29 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0227b11add6f19294dda0f6c153243caSHA-256: b5ee77dd02cc105b2c15176c32c435237be0e0947f418dda0bc7f3e113a7ef69   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation (v. 6) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.src.rpm     MD5: a7356446b327d0074cfa0ff9e85b4166SHA-256: bae9ce690d82de88c4e88f2069eebd939131484c95dafd416e399f37b0e17105   IA-32: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: bc7cd9ebdb711e88bd05ddef584db046SHA-256: 622a707262727bc9ba5cd239ffaa3b78e0c5bf1f63da394a32437b9403029c1f firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: 9bb3fe93aecfe5b49d578950ed188250SHA-256: 2aac751ffdd7d8ea7410509632381c5310634e8c22e6ef1dc9ac7bc4324d7d54   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: bc7cd9ebdb711e88bd05ddef584db046SHA-256: 622a707262727bc9ba5cd239ffaa3b78e0c5bf1f63da394a32437b9403029c1f firefox-38.7.0-1.el6_7.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 92ce0be5b9f7e9e111e6a90fec84d6ecSHA-256: dd596b6e5ab52ecec1e7809e06788b1409cfd7ae8af5a4d32f94a926f3d37632 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.i686.rpm     MD5: 9bb3fe93aecfe5b49d578950ed188250SHA-256: 2aac751ffdd7d8ea7410509632381c5310634e8c22e6ef1dc9ac7bc4324d7d54 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el6_7.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 54992f669b432d98b2cf89baf106ae97SHA-256: 1baaf80d15ea174368114dc0e985e327921d5f00e34a02103c7eee5e3756a1fa   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation (v. 7) SRPMS: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.src.rpm     MD5: a6d4ec4592670845552bf923e3725102SHA-256: 7690ea4b96e6381f72d07b88dba732fc4233ade324f8c5fe69a9a0181ca6daf1   x86_64: firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.i686.rpm     MD5: 8dbb8f192f3edca755f58d78de1959b0SHA-256: f7805562d6db31e943357ff83da8938e89f72b4785f7ffcc2c2c7cffd03f7226 firefox-38.7.0-1.el7_2.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e2496cf69bb2cd31ab1cf5f7733180d6SHA-256: 7eeb773d86adc38b2724015302b17d2b31bf682640ea2b90bad927075e12dcd0 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.i686.rpm     MD5: ae24f584073a40a955f0c7fe1fc02113SHA-256: ece091836e4620bc650356b5014187d69cff97ecfe5616b7c5236d56270a5d29 firefox-debuginfo-38.7.0-1.el7_2.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 0227b11add6f19294dda0f6c153243caSHA-256: b5ee77dd02cc105b2c15176c32c435237be0e0947f418dda0bc7f3e113a7ef69   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:
Updated nss packages that fix one security issue are now available forRed Hat Enterprise Linux 5.Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical securityimpact.

A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, whichgives a detailed severity rating, is available from the CVE link in theReferences section. Network Security Services (NSS) is a set of libraries designed to supportthe cross-platform development of security-enabled client and serverapplications.A heap-based buffer overflow flaw was found in the way NSS parsed certainASN.1 structures.

An attacker could use this flaw to create a speciallycrafted certificate which, when parsed by NSS, could cause it to crash, orexecute arbitrary code, using the permissions of the user running anapplication compiled against the NSS library. (CVE-2016-1950)Red Hat would like to thank the Mozilla project for reporting this issue.Upstream acknowledges Francis Gabriel as the original reporter.All nss users are advised to upgrade to these updated packages, whichcontain a backported patch to correct this issue.

For the update to takeeffect, all applications linked to the nss library must be restarted, orthe system rebooted. Before applying this update, make sure all previously released erratarelevant to your system have been applied.For details on how to apply this update, refer to:https://access.redhat.com/articles/11258RHEL Desktop Workstation (v. 5 client) SRPMS: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.src.rpm     MD5: 544778df37f1d2d9ce9e11098bc3b210SHA-256: e2ed10921358fe438dc597b79575e0288375277682c1f794f616d118703cec72   IA-32: nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: e9ac998fc83624b5e42b8ef508c70db4SHA-256: 7d77d7819b16fc71965ed86ca7e10f6be48c5997a13512fb8d77f56d3bf13b74 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 472d167a003745770ca3d0b7c7109ed4SHA-256: 333a39e4714a367ac8f46a26c3adb6981b8e54b09b4a241c43a84c0a2a8195fd   x86_64: nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 45061cba17fae1dfe581a415d44773bfSHA-256: 72a6d9440442e9e6765d9f22877b72a83bfa00dcfe9a704b50e565f69795d1d3 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: e9ac998fc83624b5e42b8ef508c70db4SHA-256: 7d77d7819b16fc71965ed86ca7e10f6be48c5997a13512fb8d77f56d3bf13b74 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4d831042af7dfa6e80ad6bf9579cd4efSHA-256: 65ddd0935783f0ac00c61fd3e13d7fb6509f01d3afa423c7dbfdb4c3aabc4281 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 472d167a003745770ca3d0b7c7109ed4SHA-256: 333a39e4714a367ac8f46a26c3adb6981b8e54b09b4a241c43a84c0a2a8195fd nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: c1a2ac387761f45260de137e35545280SHA-256: fb02c20684a651c675e5b81fcba40487e1c8e6cfdcb90d261888347980b9bef9   Red Hat Enterprise Linux (v. 5 server) SRPMS: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.src.rpm     MD5: 544778df37f1d2d9ce9e11098bc3b210SHA-256: e2ed10921358fe438dc597b79575e0288375277682c1f794f616d118703cec72   IA-32: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 83ca14029531b9d549bb8df9f5aac525SHA-256: 450dd70148a25759d516bb7f9ee6864a8038221cd23cffa78dd4c97a6fcaf5b2 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: e9ac998fc83624b5e42b8ef508c70db4SHA-256: 7d77d7819b16fc71965ed86ca7e10f6be48c5997a13512fb8d77f56d3bf13b74 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 472d167a003745770ca3d0b7c7109ed4SHA-256: 333a39e4714a367ac8f46a26c3adb6981b8e54b09b4a241c43a84c0a2a8195fd nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 4dc8eec54f5690c46382ff359057ab2aSHA-256: 8fe0677dc573438c67b08a066581839480190c417fd42f45b426bf9a35a27693   IA-64: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 83ca14029531b9d549bb8df9f5aac525SHA-256: 450dd70148a25759d516bb7f9ee6864a8038221cd23cffa78dd4c97a6fcaf5b2 nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ia64.rpm     MD5: a35672e89acaa20191c2a1d75da4cf71SHA-256: 27ea8e9c557bd3ec8ee5c1f44c9c73a44e55887d83216f6b529c6cb78c95fdd7 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ia64.rpm     MD5: ac3a0adacec8c1952bc40e06d3435bdfSHA-256: 192132ea5cc4e1ba95fdd88208fbf20b0f9b55bbbfe86e749f060a9c30b83c3f nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ia64.rpm     MD5: b002cc06061fe42fa347d0c058ea4811SHA-256: 6a9a2d5772f1ed63cbd4c26a5614ece8fe687840ca3da17d1fb114864085852c nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ia64.rpm     MD5: 2a10e4e1437184cd437d1a43b5501d0cSHA-256: 47c9c10468f87486ecda09fde342a1a5279d2fddc83d20fb090ac8bfa73c82a6 nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ia64.rpm     MD5: 12b8332fe8ac7dc222bb58d44e3708cdSHA-256: 501dba43ca3c730875eb36dfaadebed45504d76fd1a7ca08b7f8a52127d2c097   PPC: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc.rpm     MD5: 5f7cba235a6dfda6d50ca13db34ce18dSHA-256: b25d4537c0b393d46ec963030f6fc920e062f70a38dc63ff575a7fc875dd03cf nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc64.rpm     MD5: f4e685a10dfcf8347dad8d1a2a644933SHA-256: d037cd5df70a5548f0f6fb385e0cdfaa45c1a08ba0c3377c0e39461925b08d68 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc.rpm     MD5: 63f5dcca54604214dc325f4b611ab278SHA-256: 3232b8e8c0ca0442031caf6ee5cfc59b164ddbae71ea0647877d8e000a20dc93 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 202e7f031d0f9c208146a3122d6e2254SHA-256: a935fa28c0fe4abd58ee34124089aa04c36f83032b86ca2425b03773b0e412e0 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc.rpm     MD5: baf4fc80ff841213fd3a7c3a67960cdcSHA-256: f34e24e14ba59f3d4c6cfe02155fe10bbb4ad62a8d41e356477a22ef35f84238 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 914d98205a78f05982fc15b82f5eaf73SHA-256: f25ab7119e9df59585263f5fabc8ca336d592d16ef2e742ad0cbcf9b83a4ae6f nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc.rpm     MD5: 818fad2e71a84adfc38100213c7a45dcSHA-256: 8e0c8f779047f96ed7511e28b159e4dfc4aa2fbd6e3aaf6f6529d7c30afe0b74 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc64.rpm     MD5: 5bc98dee078cc79717e2f213d0bfc727SHA-256: 55fe6615b778c780abf646158796a8e4d659205dc2f3bb55b5d58dddedf51450 nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.ppc.rpm     MD5: 18b786adc652500b133554e106a5d1eaSHA-256: 160ef3d5462c29caaaba55dafdaea301158c696a3671f9195a0683f858b76200   s390x: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390.rpm     MD5: 6952cec820827c2a220c5dd037bceb68SHA-256: 0c6e38e62e89941560c23c04f2a6bbc1015a484f8859719d323680f1de3574c1 nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: 791a8d37c6cba0c5a1dfed5b2d05f984SHA-256: 203c91421553c236aa4510142607ad9faa771e3ede0b4ea1f189e21d447feb46 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390.rpm     MD5: 5a3c7b1fb3d3cd3ca8715ecf68c57c27SHA-256: c72d63adf72c06f88911d929276e94f8e178629a66b01ca12eddfa25df7da77c nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: bb2633f65366110d759fe4a52c048ae5SHA-256: efd7c0a5246413c2b753a562948d24ca4c30746925281295ef4fbc34cf749f41 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390.rpm     MD5: 9624cff8b5026550f9d649ea5a64e56fSHA-256: e954423ebfc1da59eaf7323b08824d8eac9757e8944dd6dcbd1546eedd98392a nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: ee26742a2127da92358babfd40a579e6SHA-256: e6969d38708320399711a4d97829d92643899420cfd11608eafe12437435474e nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390.rpm     MD5: c19938f16265b38c90a1180a6a06d044SHA-256: 73506eaa4e80c3bd63fc77724d5861a7d2c8288d1042057629e5630b6f0f7612 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: de2245af4b71574cbaef743c42af6c5fSHA-256: ed427c79215cfc23771c775776ea90e4d10601f069f65e41806f6dabda2caade nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.s390x.rpm     MD5: 8f3644756fef8157ab0459a4829562b2SHA-256: 7a9873d6f863882a8456341af4ac51c03b4f88586872accb5143c2865f0b2f8a   x86_64: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 83ca14029531b9d549bb8df9f5aac525SHA-256: 450dd70148a25759d516bb7f9ee6864a8038221cd23cffa78dd4c97a6fcaf5b2 nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4976117843e939b48d8944c3d863c2b3SHA-256: 943076eece09883a2319211f72064bb9cbd3ca45ee8f0d754a58e0a91e38ea8b nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 45061cba17fae1dfe581a415d44773bfSHA-256: 72a6d9440442e9e6765d9f22877b72a83bfa00dcfe9a704b50e565f69795d1d3 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: e9ac998fc83624b5e42b8ef508c70db4SHA-256: 7d77d7819b16fc71965ed86ca7e10f6be48c5997a13512fb8d77f56d3bf13b74 nss-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4d831042af7dfa6e80ad6bf9579cd4efSHA-256: 65ddd0935783f0ac00c61fd3e13d7fb6509f01d3afa423c7dbfdb4c3aabc4281 nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 472d167a003745770ca3d0b7c7109ed4SHA-256: 333a39e4714a367ac8f46a26c3adb6981b8e54b09b4a241c43a84c0a2a8195fd nss-pkcs11-devel-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: c1a2ac387761f45260de137e35545280SHA-256: fb02c20684a651c675e5b81fcba40487e1c8e6cfdcb90d261888347980b9bef9 nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e6937b5083bac59f1f9a23eeeb650f43SHA-256: 8076efffecd7eb91da1bb1115921bfd4b250e599597c1daeb920a9e620fa7550   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 5 client) SRPMS: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.src.rpm     MD5: 544778df37f1d2d9ce9e11098bc3b210SHA-256: e2ed10921358fe438dc597b79575e0288375277682c1f794f616d118703cec72   IA-32: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 83ca14029531b9d549bb8df9f5aac525SHA-256: 450dd70148a25759d516bb7f9ee6864a8038221cd23cffa78dd4c97a6fcaf5b2 nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 4dc8eec54f5690c46382ff359057ab2aSHA-256: 8fe0677dc573438c67b08a066581839480190c417fd42f45b426bf9a35a27693   x86_64: nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: 83ca14029531b9d549bb8df9f5aac525SHA-256: 450dd70148a25759d516bb7f9ee6864a8038221cd23cffa78dd4c97a6fcaf5b2 nss-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4976117843e939b48d8944c3d863c2b3SHA-256: 943076eece09883a2319211f72064bb9cbd3ca45ee8f0d754a58e0a91e38ea8b nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.i386.rpm     MD5: d8f4b1ead7c0738185923b7485a9f4f1SHA-256: e1dca4fae0064ec73069503185f570703b50abe5d1186e83465d84fbc0ad01dd nss-debuginfo-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 45061cba17fae1dfe581a415d44773bfSHA-256: 72a6d9440442e9e6765d9f22877b72a83bfa00dcfe9a704b50e565f69795d1d3 nss-tools-3.19.1-4.el5_11.x86_64.rpm     MD5: e6937b5083bac59f1f9a23eeeb650f43SHA-256: 8076efffecd7eb91da1bb1115921bfd4b250e599597c1daeb920a9e620fa7550   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) 1310509 - CVE-2016-1950 nss: Heap buffer overflow vulnerability in ASN1 certificate parsing (MFSA 2016-35) These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:
Microsoft releases thirteen bulletins this month, patching a total of 44 vulnerabilities. More than half of the critical vulnerabilities fixed this month support the web browsers, Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge.
Vulnerabilities rated critical also exist in Opentype font parsing kernel components, Windows Media Player, and the Windows PDF library. Microsoft reports that none of these vulnerabilities have been publicly disclosed or exploited in the wild. Most everyone running a Windows system that installs these updates will have to reboot that system.

A variety of OS, kernel driver, web browser, and entertainment and productivity applications are affected. Internet Explorer Microsoft Edge Microsoft Mail Library Loading Validation Windows Adobe Type Manager Library OpenType Font Parsing (in the past, atmfd.dll) Windows Media Microsoft Office Windows OLE supporting applications like Microsoft Office (Asycfilt.dll, Ole32.dll, Oleaut32.dll, Olepro32.dll) Windows Security Authority (seclogon.dll) Multiple Drivers (KMD) .Net Framework Microsoft is patching yet another dll sideloading vulnerability, a fairly common problem. Microsoft has been addressing dll pre/side-load problems since Win2k SP4! But this one appears to be a bit of a corner case, requiring the use of Microsoft Mail, and a malicious OLE document be opened for editing on the target’s system. We are anticipating that more than a couple of these vulnerabilities will be attacked in the wild.
In the meantime, we are prioritizing other packages, like Adobe and their updates.
ByNeil J. Rubenking Vipre has been a name to conjure with in the antivirus business for quite some time.

The product has changed over the years, bouncing from company to company and, at one point, incorporating spyware protection from the well-regarded CounterSpy. Perhaps all that moving around wasn't the best for its health.

The current incarnation, ThreatTrack Vipre Antivirus 2016, isn't your best choice for comprehensive protection.
It did improve its antiphishing and malicious URL blocking scores significantly over the tests we ran on last year's edition, but it fared poorly in tests by independent antivirus labs. You have plenty of purchase options with Vipre. You can pick one, three, five, or 10 licenses and subscribe for one, two, three, or four years.

There's a discount for more licenses and longer subscriptions, of course. Protecting a single PC for one year costs $39.99, while a 10-license four-year subscription goes for $269.99, quite a bit less than what you'd pay for 40 single licenses (almost $1,600!). Installation is simple, if not precisely quick. You fire up the installer, copy and paste your license key, and click a button labeled Agree & Continue.

That's it.

The installer checks for program updates, performs the installation, downloads the latest virus definitions, and runs a scan for active malware. You don't have to do a thing, except perhaps get some coffee or a snack.
I found the full installation process took about 10 minutes. Vipre's main window retains the look introduced with the previous edition.

Buttons let you launch or schedule a scan.

A status panel reports on the latest scans and updates.

A couple of links let you manage your account or the program's settings.
It's very slick and simple. So-So Malware BlockingA full system scan with Vipre took 46 minutes, just a little longer than the current average.

Clearly the program performs some kind of optimization during that first scan, as a repeat scan completed in just five minutes.

AVG AntiVirus Free (2016) took 27 minutes for an initial scan on this system and two minutes for a repeat scan.

F-Secure Anti-Virus 2016 cut the time even more, with a 15-minute first scan and just over one minute to repeat the scan. Of course, speed means little unless it's coupled with accuracy. My hands-on malware blocking test starts when I open a folder that contains a few dozen known malware samples.
Vipre immediately leapt into the fray, eliminating 79 percent of the samples on sight. When I launched the surviving samples, it detected a few, but didn't completely prevent installation of executable files.
It managed 86 percent detection and an overall score of 8.1 points in this test. Two products share the top overall score.

Avast Pro Antivirus 2016 detected 100 percent of these same samples, and Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2016 detected 93 percent.

Because Avast didn't completely prevent installation of malware traces, it earned 9.3 points, the same as Bitdefender.
Vipre's score puts it well below the median for this test. Of necessity, my samples in that hands-on test get used for many months. However, in my malicious URL blocking test the samples (provided by MRG-Effitas) are as new as I can manage, typically no more than a day or two old.

The test is simple enough.
I take the sample URLs and launch each in a browser protected by the product under testing.
I note whether it steers the browser away from the dangerous URL, eliminates the executable payload during download, or sits idly, doing nothing to prevent the download.
I continue until I have data for 100 malware-hosting URLs. When I tested Vipre's previous edition, it blocked just 38 percent, all of them during the download process.

This time around, Vipre's Search Guard and new Edge Protection components stepped up to raise the protection level impressively.

Between the two components, Vipre blocked access to 84 percent of the malware-hosting URLs.

Edge Protection did most of the work, though Search Guard (the one place you can still see Vipre's old snake icon) lent a hand. Vipre's 84 percent protection rate is pretty darn good; only five products have done better.

At the top of the heap are McAfee AntiVirus Plus (2016) and Symantec Norton Security Premium, each of which managed 91 percent protection. See How We Test Malware Blocking Improved Phishing Detection Malware-hosting websites are definitely dangerous, but you can also get into serious trouble by voluntarily entering your login credentials on a fraudulent website.
Imagine if a phishing site snagged your Amazon password, or the credentials for your online banking! Last year Vipre tanked this test.

This year's results are much, much better. To start my antiphishing test, I visit a number of sites that track these frauds.
Specifically, I scrape URLs that have been reported as fraudulent but not yet classified and blacklisted.
I open each URL simultaneously in a browser protected by the product under test and by antiphishing veteran Norton.
I also try each URL against the native protection of Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer.

There's a lot of variation in the types of phishing URLs, and in their cleverness, so I report the difference between the detection rate of the various products, rather than hard numbers. Vipre's detection rate was just 6 percentage points behind Norton's, the same score managed by BullGuard Antivirus (2016).
Vipre also handily beat all three browsers. Roughly two-thirds of current products failed to beat at least one of the browsers, and half of those performed worse than all three browsers. See How We Test Antiphishing Sad Lab Results Vipre's scores in my own tests ranged from so-so malware blocking to excellent phishing protection.
It didn't fare as well with the independent testing labs.
ICSA Labs does certify Vipre for malware detection and cleaning, and West Coast Labs certifies it for detection.
It managed VB100 certification in eight of the last 10 tests by Virus Bulletin.

But the scores go downhill from there. In the latest three-part test by AV-Test Institute, Vipre earned 3 points for protection, 3 for performance, and 6 points for usability.

This last figure means that Vipre avoided screwing up by identifying valid apps and URLs as malicious.

But with 6 points possible in the important protection category, a score of 3 points is pretty bad.

Avira Antivirus 2015, Bitdefender, and Kaspersky Anti-Virus (2016) all managed a perfect 18 points in this same test. Vipre's one success with AV-Test involved avoiding false positives, but in tests by AV-Comparatives false positives proved problematic.

This lab tags products with Standard certification as long as they meet all essential capabilities.

Better products can earn Advanced or Advanced+ certification, while those that don't make the grade just rank as Tested.

And whatever the basic rating, enough false positives can drag it down. I follow five tests out of the many performed by this lab.
In latest instances of those tests, Vipre earned Advanced once and Standard twice, but failed the other two tests, both times due to false positives.

That looks especially bad compared with Bitdefender and Kaspersky, which took Advanced+ ratings in all five. See How We Interpret Antivirus Lab Tests Bonus FeaturesThe Email and Privacy settings pages demonstrate that Vipre offers a number of features above and beyond the basics of antivirus.
It checks your incoming and outgoing email for malware, quarantining any problems it finds.

And it quarantines phishing messages—but not spam; antispam is reserved for the Vipre suite.

The email protection works with desktop clients only, not Web-based email, and if your email client uses non-default ports you'll need some technical skills to make it work. Vipre's Social Watch component scans your Facebook page for malicious links. Naturally you have to log in to Facebook in order for it to work. You can stay logged in and set it to scan every so often, or log out for privacy.  When you enable the secure file eraser feature, it adds an item to the right-click menu for files and folders.

After you confirm that you want a particular file or folder gone forever, it overwrites the file's data before deletion, to prevent forensic recovery of sensitive data.
I'm just as happy that it doesn't let you configure this feature, since most users aren't remotely qualified to select between the available algorithms. As you browse the Web and use your computer, you leave behind a trail of clues that a nosy person could use to reconstruct your activities.
If that bothers you, the history cleaner component can help.
It will wipe out browsing traces for many popular browsers, recent file lists for popular applications, and a number of Windows-based traces.

There's a checkbox to show only programs that you actually have installed, but in my testing it did not seem to work.
I definitely don't have Safari, Opera, or ICQ in the test system, yet they remained visible even when I checked the box. Some Ups, Some Downs ThreatTrack Vipre Antivirus 2016 performed significantly better than the 2015 edition in some areas.
It scored quite a bit better in my antiphishing and malicious URL blocking tests, probably thanks to the new Edge Protection.
Its score in my hands-on malware-blocking test was so-so, much the same as last year, but if I see top scores from the labs, I give them more weight than my own test. Unfortunately, Vipre's labs scores aren't good at all. Antivirus is a big field, and I've identified a number of Editors' Choice products.

Bitdefender Antivirus Plus and Kaspersky Anti-Virus routinely take top honors from all of the independent labs. McAfee AntiVirus Plus does well in lab tests and my own tests, and one subscription protects all of your Windows, Mac OS, and mobile devices.

And Webroot SecureAnywhere Antivirus remains the tiniest antivirus around, with an especial focus on ransomware.

Any one of these will be a better choice for your system's antivirus protection.
So update your software – now! Patch Tuesday Microsoft has published the March edition of its monthly security updates, addressing security flaws in Internet Explorer, Edge and Windows, while Adobe has issued updates for Digital Editions, Acrobat and Reader. Microsoft posted 13 bulletins this month: MS16-023 A cumulative update for Internet Explorer addressing 13 CVE-listed vulnerabilities, including remote code execution flaws.
Visiting a booby-trapped webpage using IE can trigger the execution of malicious code and malware on the system. MS16-024 A cumulative update for Microsoft Edge that addresses 10 CVE-listed memory corruption vulnerabilities and one information disclosure flaw. MS16-025 An update for a single remote code execution vulnerability in Windows.

This flaw only affects Windows Vista, Server 2008 and Server Core. "A remote code execution vulnerability exists when Microsoft Windows fails to properly validate input before loading certain libraries," says Redmond. "An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could take complete control of an affected system.

An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than users who operate with administrative user rights." MS16-026 Two CVE-listed vulnerabilities in Windows, one causing denial of service and another allowing remote code execution.
If an attacker convinces "a user to open a specially crafted document, or to visit a webpage that contains specially crafted embedded OpenType fonts," then malicious code will execute on their system. MS16-027 Two CVE-listed vulnerabilities in Windows Media Parsing, both potentially allowing remote code execution.
Visiting a webpage with a booby-trapped video embedded in it can exploit the bug to hijack the PC. MS16-028 Two flaws in the Windows PDF Library that allow for remote code execution if you open a maliciously crafted document. MS16-029 An update for Office addressing two memory corruption flaws and one security feature bypass vulnerability. Opening a document laced with bad code will trigger the bugs. MS16-030 An update for two remote code execution vulnerabilities in Windows OLE. "An attacker must convince a user to open either a specially crafted file or a program from either a webpage or an email message," noted Microsoft.

After that, code execution is possible. MS16-031 An elevation of privilege vulnerability in Windows: applications can abuse handles in memory to gain administrator-level access. MS16-032 An elevation of privilege vulnerability in the Windows Secondary Logon Service: again, applications can abuse handles in memory to gain administrator-level access. MS16-033 An update to address a flaw in the Windows USB Mass Storage Class Driver that could allow attackers to gain elevation of privilege with a specially-crafted USB drive. MS16-034 A collection of four elevation of privilege flaws in the Windows Kernel-Mode Drivers: applications can exploit these to execute malicious code at the kernel level. MS16-035 A fix for one security feature bypass flaw in the .NET framework. Adobe, meanwhile, has issued two updates for its products: Digital Editions for Windows, OS X, iOS and Android has been updated to patch a remote code execution vulnerability. Acrobat and Reader for Windows and OS X have been updated to address three CVE-listed remote code execution flaws. Users should also expect an update for unspecified vulnerabilities in Flash Player "in the coming days." ® Sponsored: 2016 global cybersecurity assurance report card
Updated chromium-browser packages that fix multiple security issues are nowavailable for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Supplementary.Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important securityimpact.

Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base scores, which givedetailed severity ratings, are available for each vulnerability from theCVE links in the References section. Chromium is an open-source web browser, powered by WebKit (Blink).Several flaws were found in the processing of malformed web content.

A webpage containing malicious content could cause Chromium to crash, executearbitrary code, or disclose sensitive information when visited by thevictim. (CVE-2016-1630, CVE-2016-1631, CVE-2016-1632, CVE-2016-1633,CVE-2016-1634, CVE-2016-1635, CVE-2016-1636, CVE-2016-1637, CVE-2016-1638,CVE-2016-1639, CVE-2016-1640, CVE-2016-1641, CVE-2016-1642)All Chromium users should upgrade to these updated packages, whichcontain Chromium version 49.0.2623.75, which corrects these issues.After installing the update, Chromium must be restarted for the changesto take effect. Before applying this update, make sure all previously released erratarelevant to your system have been applied.For details on how to apply this update, refer to:https://access.redhat.com/articles/11258Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop Supplementary (v. 6) IA-32: chromium-browser-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.i686.rpm     MD5: 267cab2b6d22958d0f50d49821f5ab88SHA-256: 5a3c2f5d25f061a4a5408de4c701c71309d5b57217d6d90b422cae66af92762c chromium-browser-debuginfo-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.i686.rpm     MD5: 3d98755969663fdf3420527081ffebacSHA-256: aae4bf3c6daa3da992449d2896de78102cd21c2c1db78b69ef5344bea8fa4b34   x86_64: chromium-browser-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.x86_64.rpm     MD5: b81d1aac5a429c38970e20e8286bfb23SHA-256: ae3d3c1deeac4a0fdad14c9c4d88a58b2ccd3809c2f0d44259ae244705caa232 chromium-browser-debuginfo-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4020df0e4764c1931e29e6c2e08ebe3cSHA-256: 8b49ffa212b4af02f2b2bd55d36b7b010d7d122167286e584914ed7979fd55b0   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server Supplementary (v. 6) IA-32: chromium-browser-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.i686.rpm     MD5: 267cab2b6d22958d0f50d49821f5ab88SHA-256: 5a3c2f5d25f061a4a5408de4c701c71309d5b57217d6d90b422cae66af92762c chromium-browser-debuginfo-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.i686.rpm     MD5: 3d98755969663fdf3420527081ffebacSHA-256: aae4bf3c6daa3da992449d2896de78102cd21c2c1db78b69ef5344bea8fa4b34   x86_64: chromium-browser-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.x86_64.rpm     MD5: b81d1aac5a429c38970e20e8286bfb23SHA-256: ae3d3c1deeac4a0fdad14c9c4d88a58b2ccd3809c2f0d44259ae244705caa232 chromium-browser-debuginfo-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4020df0e4764c1931e29e6c2e08ebe3cSHA-256: 8b49ffa212b4af02f2b2bd55d36b7b010d7d122167286e584914ed7979fd55b0   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server Supplementary EUS (v. 6.7.z) IA-32: chromium-browser-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.i686.rpm     MD5: 267cab2b6d22958d0f50d49821f5ab88SHA-256: 5a3c2f5d25f061a4a5408de4c701c71309d5b57217d6d90b422cae66af92762c chromium-browser-debuginfo-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.i686.rpm     MD5: 3d98755969663fdf3420527081ffebacSHA-256: aae4bf3c6daa3da992449d2896de78102cd21c2c1db78b69ef5344bea8fa4b34   x86_64: chromium-browser-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.x86_64.rpm     MD5: b81d1aac5a429c38970e20e8286bfb23SHA-256: ae3d3c1deeac4a0fdad14c9c4d88a58b2ccd3809c2f0d44259ae244705caa232 chromium-browser-debuginfo-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4020df0e4764c1931e29e6c2e08ebe3cSHA-256: 8b49ffa212b4af02f2b2bd55d36b7b010d7d122167286e584914ed7979fd55b0   Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation Supplementary (v. 6) IA-32: chromium-browser-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.i686.rpm     MD5: 267cab2b6d22958d0f50d49821f5ab88SHA-256: 5a3c2f5d25f061a4a5408de4c701c71309d5b57217d6d90b422cae66af92762c chromium-browser-debuginfo-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.i686.rpm     MD5: 3d98755969663fdf3420527081ffebacSHA-256: aae4bf3c6daa3da992449d2896de78102cd21c2c1db78b69ef5344bea8fa4b34   x86_64: chromium-browser-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.x86_64.rpm     MD5: b81d1aac5a429c38970e20e8286bfb23SHA-256: ae3d3c1deeac4a0fdad14c9c4d88a58b2ccd3809c2f0d44259ae244705caa232 chromium-browser-debuginfo-49.0.2623.75-1.el6.x86_64.rpm     MD5: 4020df0e4764c1931e29e6c2e08ebe3cSHA-256: 8b49ffa212b4af02f2b2bd55d36b7b010d7d122167286e584914ed7979fd55b0   (The unlinked packages above are only available from the Red Hat Network) 1314214 - CVE-2016-1630 chromium-browser: same-origin bypass in Blink1314215 - CVE-2016-1631 chromium-browser: same-origin bypass in Pepper Plugin1314216 - CVE-2016-1632 chromium-browser: bad cast in Extensions1314217 - CVE-2016-1633 chromium-browser: use-after-free in Blink1314218 - CVE-2016-1634 chromium-browser: use-after-free in Blink1314219 - CVE-2016-1635 chromium-browser: use-after-free in Blink1314220 - CVE-2016-1636 chromium-browser: SRI Validation Bypass1314221 - CVE-2016-1637 chromium-browser: information leak in Skia1314222 - CVE-2016-1638 chromium-browser: WebAPI Bypass1314224 - CVE-2016-1639 chromium-browser: use-after-free in WebRTC1314225 - CVE-2016-1640 chromium-browser: origin confusion in Extensions UI1314226 - CVE-2016-1641 chromium-browser: use-after-free in Favicon1314227 - CVE-2016-1642 chromium-browser: various fixes from internal audits These packages are GPG signed by Red Hat for security. Our key and details on how to verify the signature are available from:
In the late 1990s, Microsoft Office macros were a favorite vehicle for surreptitiously installing malware on the computers of unsuspecting targets. Microsoft eventually disabled the automated scripts by default, a setting that forced attackers to look for new infection methods. Remotely exploiting security bugs in Internet Explorer, Adobe Flash, and other widely used software soon came into favor.Over the past two years, Office Macros have made a dramatic comeback that has reached almost a fevered pitch in the past few months.

Booby-trapped Excel macros, for instance, were one of the means by which Ukrainian power authorities were infected in the weeks or months leading up to December's hacker-caused outage that affected 225,000 people. "Locky," a particularly aggressive strain of crypto ransomware that appeared out of nowhere two weeks ago, also relies on Word macros.

The return of the macro-delivered malware seemed to begin in late 2014 with the advent of a then-new banking trojan called Dridex. The return of the macro may have been a reaction to security improvements that Adobe, Microsoft, and Oracle have made to their software. Not only were the companies patching dangerous bugs more quickly, but in many cases, they fortified their code with defenses that caused exploits to simply crash the application rather than force it to execute malicious code.
Streamlined update mechanisms and greater end user awareness about the importance of installing security patches right away may also have made code-execution exploits to fall out of favor. The renewed embrace of the macro is also consistent with the modus operandi attackers have exhibited for years. What's the point of burning a highly valuable zero-day vulnerability when a run-of-the-mill social engineering ploy and an easy-to-write visual basic script accomplishes the same thing? Enlarge Phishme.com New dogs learn old tricks The new era of macro-delivered infections poses challenges that didn't exist in the late 1990s.

Back then, getting targets to open a poisoned Office document was usually enough to compromise their computer. Now that macros are disabled by default, the attacker has to create a ruse that convinces the mark to enable macros.

A favorite ploy is to present a document with blurred, obscured, or misformed text, along with the promise that allowing a macro to run will cause that document to be displayed correctly. Judging from the success of Dridex and Locky, it appears the ruse works well. The resurgence underscores some sad truisms in the world of security.

First, old tricks work wonders and often provide attackers with a useful fallback when countermeasures and security improvements threaten the spread of malicious applications.
Second, human gullibility and error are a constant.
Sadly, that's true not only for inebriated people surfing porn in the wee hours, but also end users who clearly should know better—such as those inside the Ukrainian power authority, who were infected with malware known as BlackEnergy. (In fairness, accountants and other types of professionals often rely on macros to do their jobs.) Readers who receive documents in e-mail should think twice about opening them at all.

They should think doubly hard before ever enabling a macro. (In the 10 or so years since Microsoft disabled macros by default, I've never once enabled one, and there has never been a bad outcome.) Unfortunately, there are no readily available patches for the kind of ineptitude that make these types of attacks possible. Or as Ron White put it, you can't fix stupid.

Expect them to remain a core part of the malware scene for the foreseeable future.
Eight high-severity flaws found Google has released Chrome version 49, closing 26 bugs and shelling out US$51,000 to support bug hunters. Now in Chrome's stable channel, the new version sports eight high and five medium severity fixes. Chrome test engineer Krishna Govind says Google paid US$36,500 (£33,334, A$49,671) for the bug bounty reports in the now stable version of Chrome, and an additional US$14,000 (£9879, A$19,050) for fixes in other Chrome channels. "We would like to thank all security researchers that worked with us during the development cycle to prevent security bugs from ever reaching the stable channel," Govind says. "Many of our security bugs are detected using AddressSanitizer, MemorySanitizer, Control Flow Integrity or LibFuzzer." Two same-origin bypasses were closed in Blink and the Pepper Plugin, three use-after-free holes shuttered in Blink and one each in WebRTC and Favicon. The remaining holes included a SRI validation bypass, an out-of-bounds access in libpng, origin confusion, and an information leak. Google launched its lucrative bug bounty five years ago and has since paid out US$6 million(£5.5 million, A$8.2 million) in bounties to researchers with an average of US$1.2 million (£1.1 million, A$1.6 million) paid out a year. The largest payment was US$37,500 (£34,260, A$26,469) made to an Android security researcher last year. ® Sponsored: DevOps for Dummies 2nd edition
Jerome Segura, a senior security researcher with Malwarebytes, was recently stumped by a cyber attack he was studying.
It seemed to keep vanishing. Segura often studies malvertising, which involves seeding ad networks with harmful online advertisements that then appear on websites, potentially delivering malware to a person's computer. It's a particularly insidious type of attack, since a person merely has to view an advertisement to become infected if their computer has a software vulnerability.  "We knew there was something different that malvertisers were doing," said Segura in a phone interview Thursday. The problem was they couldn't replicate the attack by viewing the malicious ad.
It's almost as if the attackers knew they were being watched. Cyber attackers often profile machines -- known as fingerprinting -- in order to attack ones that are being used by security researchers. Machines on certain IP addresses or VPN networks or those running virtual machines won't be attacked. Segura couldn't get another look at the attack until he went home and used his home computer rather than the ones in Malwarebytes' lab. The suspicious advertisement contained a one-by-one pixel GIF image.

That's not usual, as pixels are used for tracking purposes, but this one actually contained JavaScript. The JavaScript exploits an information leakage vulnerability (CVE-2013-7331) in older unpatched versions of Internet Explorer, Segura said.

The vulnerability can be used to parse a computer's file system and figure out if it's running certain AV programs. If a computer checked out, its user was redirected by the advertisement to a server running the Angler exploit kit, Segura said. It is not unusual for cyber attackers to do some quick reconnaissance on potential victims.

But Segura said this time around, the attackers are also taking other steps that make it very difficult for ad networks and security researchers to detect bad behavior. The malicious ad, including the one-by-one pixel, was also delivered over SSL/TLS, which makes it harder to detect potentially malicious behavior, Segura said. The malicious ad was carried by Google's DoubleClick and dozens of other ad networks.
It appears the attackers had set up fake domains and even LinkedIn profiles months before to appear they were legitimate before supplying their malicious advertisement to the online advertising companies. "It shows you how deceptive they can be and how many fake advertisers are out there," he said. Segura said he has been in touch with DoubleClick and other online advertising companies, but the malvertising ad is still running in some places. The automated nature of online advertising and the labyrinth of relationships between companies has made filtering malicious ads difficult, he said. "What criminals have figured out is it's easier to infiltrate a third partner that works with Google but doesn't necessarily have the same security screening and tight guidelines," Segura said. Malwarebytes posted a writeup of its research on its blog.
The Internet is becoming harder to browse for users of Tor, the anonymity network that provides greater privacy, according to a new study. The blame can be placed largely on those who use Tor, short for The Onion Router, for spamming or cyber attacks.

But the fallout means that those who want to benefit from the system's privacy protections are sometimes locked out. Researchers scanned the entire IPv4 address space and found that 1.3 million websites will not allow a connection coming from a known Tor exit node.

Also, some 3.67 percent of Alexa's top 1000 websites will block Tor users at the application level. It results in Tor users "effectively being relegated to the role of second-class citizens on the Internet," they wrote. "Anonymous communication on the Internet is a critical resource for people whose access to the Internet is restricted by governments," the paper reads. "However, the utility of anonymity networks is threatened by services on the Internet that block or degrade requests from anonymous users." Tor is a network of distributed nodes that provide greater privacy by encrypting a person’s browsing traffic and routing that traffic through random proxy servers.

The project was started by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory although it is now maintained by the nonprofit Tor Project. Using Tor requires downloading a specialized version of the Firefox browser. When a person visits a website, the website only sees the IP address of the so-called Tor "exit node" server, which could be anywhere in the world. The problem is that while Tor is used by people looking to safeguard their privacy, it's also used by cyber attackers to mask their activities. Because of that, some companies that provide specialized and attack-resistant content delivery systems have either blocked or made it difficult for those using Tor to access services, the researchers wrote. CloudFlare, a large content delivery service, does not explicitly block Tor users, but it does assign a reputation score to Tor exit nodes.
If an IP address has a poor reputation, visitors that have come through via that flagged exit node might see a CAPTCHA, the jumbled text that users have to solve before proceeding. The Tor Project has a list of commonly seen blocking messages, including one from Akamai, another large content delivery service.

Craigslist and Yelp also appear to have their own custom detection algorithms to limit Tor users. Google and Yahoo do not block Tor for search, but the researchers noticed that some pages and functions within those sites were blocked. "While many websites block Tor to reduce abuse, doing so inadvertently impacts users from censored countries who do not have other ways to access censored Internet content," they wrote. The paper was authored by Sheharbano Khattak, David Fifield, Sadia Afroz, Mobin Javed, Srikanth Sundaresan, Vern Paxson, Steven J. Murdoch and Damon McCoy.

Net Nanny (for Android)

ByJordan Minor, Neil J. Rubenking The kids are alright, and if you're a parent who wants to keep them that way, it's a good idea to monitor the content they consume online.
It also pays to know which devices they are using to view that content, and anyone with eyes can tell most kids today do the majority of their Web browsing on a mobile phone.

Fortunately, ContentWatch offers a version of its Net Nanny parental control tool specifically for Android devices.
It feels a bit more like a tentacle of the impressive main service than a full Android app in its own right, but Net Nanny for Android delivers powerful parental protection to your child's Android phone or tablet.

There's currently no iOS version.  Baby StepsFor $59.99 per year you can purchase a Net Nanny subscription that will cover up to five devices, from desktops to mobile phones.
If that's not enough, $79.99 gets you ten licenses plus a year of Net Nanny Social, the company's social-media monitoring service. However, the Android version is also available as a standalone product for $12.99 per year, an offer most rivals can't claim.

There's also a generous, two-week free trial.  We loaded up the Android edition on a Moto X for a look at how it works.
If you're already familiar with the full Net Nanny 7, getting started is simple; just install and launch the app and then log in to Net Nanny's online dashboard.
Installation requires a few steps, as the app requires deep-level permissions. Once you identify which user owns the device, Net Nanny loads the appropriate settings and goes to work. If this is your first time with the service, however, expect to do a little more setup.

Create a profile for your child and Net Nanny automatically configures censorship settings based on their age range.

The service monitors and reports on users' activity regardless of which device they use.
If you create an Internet schedule to designate when your child can be online, the schedule you've defined applies to Android devices, too.

And if you've imposed an Internet time allowance, time spent on any device chips away at that allowance. Your child can't just switch to the PC after running out of time on Android. All browsing must go through the Net Nanny browser—that's how it manages to control and monitor access.
In order to retain this control, Net Nanny blocks the use of all other apps that make browser-related calls to the Android OS.
It definitely gets the major browsers, and it should catch the oddballs, too.

The Net Nanny browser fortunately doesn't feel underpowered or unsecure compared to Chrome.
It even maintains the desktop edition's ability to mask profanity, as opposed to blocking the entire page. Most importantly, however, parents of Android owners can take advantage of Net Nanny's Web-filtering options, which are the most powerful and granular we've seen. Most apps are satisfied with just blocking obvious harmful material like pornography or violence; only Net Nanny has an option for specifically keeping our children safe from the single greatest plague of our age: anime. What's New On Android? Net Nanny on Android leverages most of the features that make the full service so fantastic, but it also has some unique mobile functionality. Once you've installed it on one Android device, you see a new tab for each user in the online console, with the title Applications.

This tab lists the applications found on the Android device and lets you block specific apps. You can also block access to the Google Play store, or subsets of the store, and prevent your children from changing the settings, too.

Cautious parents can turn on the option to block all new applications pending parental approval. it would be nice if Net Nanny actively blocked apps based on their content ratings, too. While app management is very useful, we expected a few more Android-specific features from Net Nanny.

Android parental control Editors' Choice Norton Family Parental Control and Android app Qustodio Parental Control 2015 both allow parents to block and monitor calls and text messages, as well as tracking a child's location.

Communicating with strangers is a huge source of potential danger, especially on mobile phones.

The separate Net Nanny Social service can track social media accounts, but calls and texts are still left vulnerable, even with that service.   Another aspect that weakens Net Nanny's Android app as a standalone product is its reliance on the Web version.

The app is really just the safe browser to keep kids away from banned websites.
If you try to use parental online dashboard from a mobile phone, you're redirected to Net Nanny's Web interface.

The interface is robust and filled with all sorts of reports and monitoring tools, but navigating it on a phone isn't ideal. Qustodio and Mobicip have the same problem, although Mobicip does have a limited parental control app optimized for mobile devices.

Based on our current testing, only Norton's parental control app provides all the power you want tailored exclusively for your phone.

But while there are some deficits for those using Net Nanny as a standalone Android app, it's powerful when combined with the main service on a desktop Web browser, and that's how many parents are probably going to use it. A Spoonful of Net Nanny Helps the Internet Go DownFor more details on Net Nanny's bevy of features check out our full review of Net Nanny 7. Many of those same features are still impressive on Android, as are the new ones, such as app management and single-device subscriptions.

But when judging these apps solely on their ability to keep children secure on Android, Norton Family Parental Control is our Editors' Choice.